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  1. #1
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    Default Shannon Peters pulling her horses shoes

    Anyone else read the article in the February, 2013 issue of Dressage Today about Shannon Peters decision to pull her horses shoes? She got such good results that Steffan was persuaded to pull Ravel's. Interesting article.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp



  2. #2
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    Yep. Waiting for the farriers to weigh in, but that's what I always felt. I was competing my mare GP barefoot 8 years ago and all of mine are barefoot. I kinda got blasted in here when I said that because they might be "better" with shoes. Now, if they wold turn them all out in pasture and let them be horses in between riding, that would be great!


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  3. #3
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    Default

    Ravel is retired, though, so...???

    Not saying it's a bad thing. Heck, my horse is barefoot and looks great despite living on a property that has tons of coral rock sticking out all over the place. Just wondering why Ravel was mentioned, as I didn't think Steffan was even riding him anymore (and IIRC, wasn't Ravel in Eponas?).


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  4. #4
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    Beentheredonethat, the horses at their farm are treated like royalty, the place is immaculate, beautiful and the horses ARE turned out. Here in SoCal pasture is exceptionally rare, and what little there is, is usually of very low quality.



  5. #5
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    Default

    A blanket policy for all horses is hardly a paradigm for thoughtful horsemanship, be it shoes, no shoes, feed, or anything else.
    Click here before you buy.


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  6. #6
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Default

    Can someone tell those of us who have not seen the article what it is says?

    I agree with Delta, there is no one policy for every horse. Some do great barefoot, some do great with shoes. Treat them all as individuals.


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  7. #7
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    When it comes to horse management, whether it be farriery, meds, feed, etc., what the BNT's and BNR's do in no way influences my decisions.


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  8. #8
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    Default

    The article did say that Ravel had a quarter crack and that is what prompted them to pull shoes, and that he had had them before.

    I had one horse who required careful balancing with shoes. When he did start a small crack, my farrier saw it-apologized--!!!, and was supercareful trimming and shoeing. Not so surprisingly it went away.

    This was a horse that despite a nice solid looking foot did not do well barefoot unless in an arena full time. Not an option for the sanity of either of us.

    And I've shown some barefoot almost all their lives.

    Just hate it when someone well known loudly hops on a bandwagon.!!
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  9. #9
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    IMO, true quarter cracks are caused by incompetent farriers or severe neglect.

    I wonder why it took this person so long to figure out that some horses can go barefoot without any issues.


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  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    IMO, true quarter cracks are caused by incompetent farriers or severe neglect.
    Don't forget poor limb conformation and treading injuries.


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  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    IMO, true quarter cracks are caused by incompetent farriers or severe neglect.

    I wonder why it took this person so long to figure out that some horses can go barefoot without any issues.
    I really agree with the last part. It sort of astounds me that this is big news.

    I doubt whether Ravel had incompetent farriers in Holland. It is well known that he had these hoof issues when Akiko bought him for "only" 3 million. He had a metal plate on his hoof to hold it together. He's had them all along. The article is not clear, but she decided to try him barefoot after he was retired. I imagine they didn't before because they just didn't want to take any chances with an Olympic horse.

    It does say they also use a lot of boots to transition horses, and I know the ground is a lot harder and rockier there than other places.

    runnjump--I know they are "turned out" there. What I meant was living in a herd 24/7 so they can move all of the time like real horses. I do know the Peter's horses have it a lot better than many others in CA--my friend had her horse there. "Royalty" to you might mean being in a clean stall and getting turn out. Royalty to a horse might be closer to being head to tail with another horse, playing bit me, and rolling in the mud all day long. I know my horses are sounder for it.


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  12. #12
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    The article states that Ravel's shoes were pulled prior to the Olympics, that he wore aluminum plates just for the Olympic competition, then returned to barefoot after.

    A blanket policy for all horses is hardly a paradigm for thoughtful horsemanship, be it shoes, no shoes, feed, or anything else.
    I seriously doubt that the Peters adopt any blanket policies to be applied to all horses without individual consideration. The article does, however, detail the benefits to the structure of the hoof and the horse's movement. Some of their horses did and do require some protection. Those horses wear boots even in the warm-up ring, removing them before they enter the competition arena. I also read the article to say that they have not found one of their horses who were not able to go without shoes or for whom the benefits were not realized.

    I didn't post this as a condemnation of all shoes; just a call to be a bit more open minded as we consider what is best for the health and welfare of each of our horses; to stop doing things just because that is the way we've always done them.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp


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  13. #13
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    Default

    I can completely understand why people don't want their six-figure horses living in a herd 24/7, but that's just me.


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    I doubt whether Ravel had incompetent farriers in Holland.
    That being the case, it begs the question of why he had an ongoing issue with quarter cracks.............
    It is well known that he had these hoof issues when Akiko bought him for "only" 3 million. He had a metal plate on his hoof to hold it together. He's had them all along.
    Still begs the question of 'why?' and why were they not remediated? During my long and [less than] storied career, I have had many occasions to deal with quarter cracks as well as cracks in other locations around the perimeter of the hoof. Most all of those horses worked as hard, if not harder, as Ravel, and usually on less perfect surfaces. I have yet to have a horse with a quarter crack, other than one that is the result of permanent injury/scarring at the coronary level, not heal completely and without further recurrence. Even some of those with squarter cracks due to scarring, healed such that while there remained evidence in the wall of the scarring, the 'line' was closed and the wall, unified. And when we take into consideration that Ravel, at one point, had an eight month layoff due to a leg injury, it is even more baffling why his hoof care provider(s) couldn't get the crack(s) resolved. (Disclaimer: I do not know the history of his hoof care and could not find any links to it that I could investigate.)

    The article is not clear, but she decided to try him barefoot after he was retired.
    Why not? After all, he is retired....... And if it doesn't work, there are viable alternatives. 'Course, I doubt I would recommend the barefoot option for a horse with active, unresolved, working, quarter cracks. ymmv.

    I imagine they didn't before because they just didn't want to take any chances with an Olympic horse.
    Who could blame them? Especially considering how much trouble they had with his feet..........

    It is wise to remember that while all horses can be barefoot, not all horses should be barefoot. As is ever the case, "It Depends".


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  15. #15
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    Default

    LOL. Rick, why do you think it is so? Owners who can afford the best for a horse at the top of its discipline...and yet the quarter cracks.



  16. #16
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    With or without shoes, I am sure her horses have the VERY BEST of everything possible! Lucky horses.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  17. #17
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by runNjump86 View Post
    I can completely understand why people don't want their six-figure horses living in a herd 24/7, but that's just me.
    LOL I too understand... I put my two loves of my life retirees in pasture with other horses and crap my one horse look like death - - - Huge hematomas everywhere, gashes, bumps, lumps - other horse was high in the pecking order and had a few gashes... you kind of put them out and close your eyes...

    But saying that, I have had stalled horses rack themselves up pretty good too getting cast on the barn walls...
    Train like you have never won and show like you have never lost!!!


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  18. #18
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    Default

    I understand BUT I have also had the worst injuries ever sustained to my horses in stalls. Top of the list is a probable broken pelvis when cast and a leg through a bucket handle that ended in a torn hind suspensory. Career ending pasture accidents? Nada. Knocking on wood.

    With enough space and the right friends, horses can live out and look good, too. No cuts and gashes here except for under rare and odd circumstances. Thats a sign there is a problem
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    I understand BUT I have also had the worst injuries ever sustained to my horses in stalls. Top of the list is a probable broken pelvis when cast and a leg through a bucket handle that ended in a torn hind suspensory. Career ending pasture accidents? Nada. Knocking on wood.
    I know off topic but I think pasture is a great thing but the thing that seems very critical is which horses are together in the herd. I have now two together and "knock on wood" do very well.

    The horses over the corrals that are not together seem to cause more cuts to each other than the two together.

    Sorry to hear about the stall injury. I understand that as well. Had a horse injure his sacroiliac cast on barn wall.

    I think there is one thing most of us can agree on and that is horses do things we don't want them doing.
    Train like you have never won and show like you have never lost!!!


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  20. #20
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    My husband calls them big hairy toddlers trying to kill themselves.

    I think shared fence lines are the devil LOL
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


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