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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2003
    Location
    Franklin, MA
    Posts
    1,016

    Default Saddle repair question - flap wearing thin

    I ride in an old (ancient!) Hermes Steinkraus which I love and don't want to give up. However, the flap is wearing thin where the girth buckles rub against it. It hasn't worn through yet, but I fear there isn't much life left in that leather.

    Is this something that can be repaired? How would it be done and does it look atrocious afterwards?

    Thanks in advance for the replies!
    "A goal without a plan is just a wish."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Posts
    748

    Default

    Ask the person who repairs your tack to put an extra layer of leather on the inside of the flap. Do it on both sides so you won't notice a difference, and do it before it breaks!

    If you let the leather completely wear off, it will look atrocious!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2001
    Location
    The Great White North, where we get taxed out the wazoo
    Posts
    621

    Default

    I would contact the company and see what they might suggest, or take it to the most expert repair place you know of and ask. Patching on the inside is a great idea, but might it be possible to replace the flap(s) as well? I have an aging Crosby that I adore that I am wondering about replacing the panels underneath on as they are cracking. Its hard to part with a saddle you love...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2000
    Location
    Middleburg, VA USA
    Posts
    292

    Default

    Do you use a billet guard? If not it would help without much expense or ugly patching.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Location
    missouri
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    inside patch, glued with minimal stitching. have them trim the leather around the edges so it thins out so you won't feel s lump.

    i would never replace en entire flap on an old saddle like yours.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2003
    Location
    Franklin, MA
    Posts
    1,016

    Default

    Yeah, I use billet guards. It's just a really old saddle that has seen a lot of wear over the years. But it's such a perfect saddle...lol. Thanks everyone for the advice, I will see if any of these patching options might work.
    "A goal without a plan is just a wish."



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    Good luck getting your saddle fixed...I bet that saddle is incredibly comfortable to ride in, I wouldn't want to give it up either!!

    Incidentally, where/how would one go about finding a saddle repair place? I have asked around here and can't find anyone that knows of anyone.



  8. #8

    Default

    I have an ancient Hermes as well, that I am having repaired by Hermes. I just called the Hermes store, and they said bring it in. I wanted to make sure that the integrity of the saddle was kept. Good Luck!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,795

    Default

    Yes, it can be repaired. There are lots of wonderful saddle repairpeople around the country, but if you're in Massachusetts, you're lucky enough to have folks within driving distance.

    Colin Kimball-Davis is very good and does a lot of the saddle work for Duett and several other companies:
    http://www.theenglishsaddler.com/index.html

    Smith Worthington Saddle Company is in Hartford, CT and they do outstanding work in their in-house facility. Their prices are awesome, but don't let that fool you: these folks know what they're doing.
    http://smithworthington.com/

    Patty Barnett at East Crow Saddlery is outstanding, and she's based in Connecticut.
    http://www.eastcrowsaddlery.com/

    equinekingdom, David Young is about three hours SW of you in Greenville, SC and he is excellent. I think there's someone closer to you too, but the name is slipping my mind. Stupid Fridays! 864-370-3143 or davidceramics@bellsouth.net

    There are plenty of others, too. Some ways to ferret them out:
    1. Ask your local tack shop, although many of them will just refer you to Beval (which is fine, but Beval is very pricey. It's like sending your car to the dealership for repair instead of using an independent mechanic: you'll get wonderful work, but you'll pay top dollar for it.)
    2. Find a Society of Master Saddlers certified saddler. They maintain a list on their web site, but even that is incomplete. For example, they list Suzie Schurer of Schurer Saddlery in Pennsylvania, but they don't note that she's a saddle repairperson (and she is, and a very good one at that.)
    3. Ask on COTH.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2003
    Location
    Franklin, MA
    Posts
    1,016

    Default

    jn4jenny - thank you so much for the excellent referrals! I will check them out. I still haven't had my saddle repaired. I would be thrilled to get a few more years out of this one!
    "A goal without a plan is just a wish."



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