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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
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    NYC=center of the universe
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    2,083

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    Roxylisk, I would say your horse is "sensitive to the aids", rather than "sensitive", no? And he has a "good work ethic". I think your description is filled with negative connotations ("but", "sensitive", etc.). I would make it read with a positive connotation (except in the case where there really is something negative that needs to be included).

    Sorry, all. Carry on.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
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    1,288

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    Quote Originally Posted by ako View Post
    I would say a 5. And I would probably at the top say he'd be a great horse for an intermediate rider looking for X, or a non-beginner working with a trainer. Maybe even say a 4 because you provide a thorough explanation.
    If he doesn't buck/rear or spook super hard, I would also note that.
    I think COTH is a rather honest group. But I still do think a lot of other posters deflate a bit and anything 6 or above doesn't get much traction.

    Edited to add: maybe even leave off the rating because the ad explains thoroughly?
    He does not buck or rear - he also doesn't get crabby about a rider who is bumping him or bouncing on his back, he actually tries to figure out what the heck they want him to do and gets wiggly. In the year I've been riding him, he's had exactly one big spook that put me on the ground. And that was a 'legitimate' spook in my book, and he didn't leave but stayed close to me. Most of the time, he spooks in place and does a SPLAT with all four feet spread (where they drop a couple inches). And he really doesn't spook all that much. But def not for a beginner.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
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    1,288

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    Quote Originally Posted by ako View Post
    Roxylisk, I would say your horse is "sensitive to the aids", rather than "sensitive", no? And he has a "good work ethic". I think your description is filled with negative connotations ("but", "sensitive", etc.). I would make it read with a positive connotation (except in the case where there really is something negative that needs to be included).

    Sorry, all. Carry on.

    Yes, exactly - sensitive to the aids. (this is the BO's horse, and he's a bit too much for her but is still a really nice horse - I've been riding him for her) Less is more with him. You think about whoa and he stops. You whisper with your leg on his side and he leg yeilds or side-passes smoothly over. He's not trying to run away from your aids, he is trying to do what you want. You look over your shoulder (shifting your weight) and he does a nice turn and goes the other direction. I cantered him once on a hunter pace in the middle of a group of a dozen horses. He was happy to go but didn't try to run off. And when we were done, he walked happily on a loose rein. He's a neat horse actually.

    I like that phrase, it suits him much better. Thanks for the input everyone !



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
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    5,623

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kareen View Post
    ... 5=would be perfect temp. for average rider who liked a horse that does not require too much seat (or generally speaking intervention) to get to work but won't have a go button with no switch to turn off either.*lol*
    This post's description is consistent with my expectation of the 1-10 temperament scale (tolerance is a more accurate expression), too. I think the discipline is important ... a self-taught trail rider is likely going to have different expectations than someone who is comfortable and familiar around upper level dressage training.

    I just got a lovely young-ish horse who was advertised by her previous-to-previous seller as a "5". She was also advertised as 2nd/3rd level but was marketed as an eventer prospect.

    After 3 months in full dressage training (5 sessions a week combination of lessons w/me or training rides by FEI pro) I'd say she's developed into more of a Kareen-7 ... (and truly ready to complete at 2nd level). The environment sparked her very ... uhh ... enthusiastic work ethic.
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=



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