The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 124
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thathorse View Post
    "If I can anything, I would can salsa or straight tomatoes. We love salsa. I have seriously considered getting a job at Chevy's to discover their salsa recipe. I know it is roasted and I love it."


    The Chevy's recipe is online, just google it! the customer service gal who helped me track down a tomato shark (great in theory but not in practice I found) told me about it. We made a bunchon the grill last autumn and froze it. Maybe we'll do Mexican for diner tonight;-)

    sorry, I haven't gotten the hang of the quote feature!
    it's really easy: hit 'reply with quote'

    you can delete what you don't want between the [ quote]........[ /quote] part.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  2. #62
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    I have no intention of buying plants - I'm talking about just buying the fruit.
    Keep Dreaming, Missy!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
    Posts
    4,114

    Default

    I definitely feel like an over achiever now - 17 raised beds (they're 12 x 4).

    One will be put into strawberries this year, I think. And one will go into blackberries next year.

    I grow a lot of viney winter squash and pumpkin, and those take up a lot of space. Plus the potatoes and sweet potatoes take up a lot of space. This y

    This year I joined the Seed of the Month Club for fun - https://www.facebook.com/SeedsOfTheM...ref=ts&fref=ts - they send your 8 seed packets the first month and 4 each month after. I have gotten some staples - like tomatoes, jalapenos, etc. (staples for me anyway!). But I've also gotten stuff I've never tried like parsnips, turnips, and araminth. I'll try them... it'll be fun.

    This year for the garden, I have:
    Acorn squash
    Araminth
    Arugula
    Banana peppers
    Basil
    Bush beans
    Beets
    Bell peppers (two full sized varieties and one mini variety)
    Broccoli
    Buttercup squash
    Butternut squash
    Cabbage - red and green
    Cantalope
    Carrot
    Cauliflower
    Celery
    Chard
    Chives
    Cilantro
    Corn
    Cress
    Cucumbers (I want to try pickling)
    Dill
    Eggplant (3 kinds)
    Endive
    Fennel
    Garlic (growing now)
    Honeydew
    Jalapeno
    Kale
    Leek
    Lettuce - both head and leaf
    Okra
    Onions (red and white - plus bunching)
    Oregano (I've never had luck growing this - but I am going to try one more time)
    Parsnip
    Parsley
    Peanuts
    Potatoes
    Pumpkins
    Radish
    Rutabega
    Scallions
    Spaghetti Squash
    Spinach
    Summer squash - yellow straight neck
    Sweet potatoes
    Tomatillas
    Tomatoes (4 kinds - I think)
    Turnip
    Watermelow
    Zuiccini

    We spent about 3 1/2 hours working out in it today. Built the last 5 raised beds, cleared weeds out of one old bed, put cardboard and landscape fabric down between beds. Tuesday I will plant lettuce, kale, and a few other things.
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirljenn View Post
    I definitely feel like an over achiever now - 17 raised beds (they're 12 x 4).

    One will be put into strawberries this year, I think. And one will go into blackberries next year.

    I grow a lot of viney winter squash and pumpkin, and those take up a lot of space. Plus the potatoes and sweet potatoes take up a lot of space. This y

    This year I joined the Seed of the Month Club for fun - https://www.facebook.com/SeedsOfTheM...ref=ts&fref=ts - they send your 8 seed packets the first month and 4 each month after. I have gotten some staples - like tomatoes, jalapenos, etc. (staples for me anyway!). But I've also gotten stuff I've never tried like parsnips, turnips, and araminth. I'll try them... it'll be fun.

    This year for the garden, I have:
    Acorn squash
    Araminth
    Arugula
    Banana peppers
    Basil
    Bush beans
    Beets
    Bell peppers (two full sized varieties and one mini variety)
    Broccoli
    Buttercup squash
    Butternut squash
    Cabbage - red and green
    Cantalope
    Carrot
    Cauliflower
    Celery
    Chard
    Chives
    Cilantro
    Corn
    Cress
    Cucumbers (I want to try pickling)
    Dill
    Eggplant (3 kinds)
    Endive
    Fennel
    Garlic (growing now)
    Honeydew
    Jalapeno
    Kale
    Leek
    Lettuce - both head and leaf
    Okra
    Onions (red and white - plus bunching)
    Oregano (I've never had luck growing this - but I am going to try one more time)
    Parsnip
    Parsley
    Peanuts
    Potatoes
    Pumpkins
    Radish
    Rutabega
    Scallions
    Spaghetti Squash
    Spinach
    Summer squash - yellow straight neck
    Sweet potatoes
    Tomatillas
    Tomatoes (4 kinds - I think)
    Turnip
    Watermelow
    Zuiccini

    We spent about 3 1/2 hours working out in it today. Built the last 5 raised beds, cleared weeds out of one old bed, put cardboard and landscape fabric down between beds. Tuesday I will plant lettuce, kale, and a few other things.
    I haz garden envy!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    Keep Dreaming, Missy!
    No need for me to dream too long. Both do show up at our local farmers market occasionally, & "Whole Foods" carries black, red, & even white currants during the season.



  6. #66
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    No need for me to dream too long. Both do show up at our local farmers market occasionally, & "Whole Foods" carries black, red, & even white currants during the season.
    so you have to dream till summer....
    ah shucks. I don't think they grow here....I LOVE red Currant jelly!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  7. #67
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post



    I was planning on tomatoes, tomatatillos, peppers, and everything else for salsa and guacamole. I might try two batches of cilantro, as it seems to get too weedy and then go to seed by mid summer--despite frequent pruning.

    If I can anything, I would can salsa or straight tomatoes. We love salsa. I have seriously considered getting a job at Chevy's to discover their salsa recipe. I know it is roasted and I love it.
    Do keep in mind that if you're not a "canner" (as I'm not), that salsa freezes very well.



  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Do keep in mind that if you're not a "canner" (as I'm not), that salsa freezes very well.
    My problem with salsa is that the cilantro is ready first, then garlic, then the tomatoes, then the onions. How do people time it properly? I guess I can stagger the cilantro, but there is a problem with the tomatoes and onions being ready....sigh....it never works for me. Usually the cilantro bolts mid-May and the tomatoes aren't ready until late July...



  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
    Location
    Area 51
    Posts
    1,647

    Default

    This year we will only plant tomatoes near strong, sturdy fence.

    We are concentrating on short season peppers, smaller too.

    Spread out our winter squashes now that we know the rough maturation dates on some of them that weren't labeled in the catalogue.
    I LOVE my Chickens!



  10. #70
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    My problem with salsa is that the cilantro is ready first, then garlic, then the tomatoes, then the onions. How do people time it properly? I guess I can stagger the cilantro, but there is a problem with the tomatoes and onions being ready....sigh....it never works for me. Usually the cilantro bolts mid-May and the tomatoes aren't ready until late July...
    While it's nice to be able to get all the ingredients from your garden, I just use my own tomatoes, hot peppers, & cilantro (which I make successive plantings of all season) from my garden, & use onions & garlic from the farmers market &/or supermarket.



  11. #71
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2011
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Can anyone recommend a soil testing kit? I know we have acidic soil, since we're in NE, but I have no idea if there is anything else I should be adding. My SO is fertilizer happy, as well, and I feel like he puts way too much on.
    You can usually buy basic soil test kits at a good garden center. Some are more accurate than others. Easiest thing might be to submit a soil sample to your local extension service office (CES). Call them for directions on gathering the sample. Collect soil as instructed & put in a ziploc. Bring to CES. They will send it to the local university lab & get you printout of the basic soil nutrient levels and pH, for a small fee. You can often get mirconutrients for an additional fee, but I'd save the money unless you have noticed some definite problems.

    If you ask, many will also make recommendations on what and how much fertilizer to use. Then you can "share" with DH and show him how you can save money buy not putting out so much fertilizer. Excess fertilizer use is not only expensive but also bad for water quality when it leaches into the aquifer.

    I like to use lots of aged compost for a variety of reasons. It helps stabilize the pH some, adds organic matter, and aids moisture retention. If you need to bring pH up a lot, dolomitic lime is the go-to material. Realize that lime breaks down very slowly and may take a year to show any effect. Again, the soil test results should tell you how much you might need to add. Most fertilizers tend to acidify the soil over time, so DH may be contributing to an acid pH problem.

    My problem with salsa is that the cilantro is ready first, then garlic, then the tomatoes, then the onions. How do people time it properly? I guess I can stagger the cilantro, but there is a problem with the tomatoes and onions being ready....
    Ah, timing is everything. Really it's not that hard for salsa. Remember garlic and onions both store quite well if kept cool/refrigerated. So they are easy to hold until the tomatoes are ready. As for the cilantro - I use a slow bolting variety; literally named that & available from Renee's Garden Seeds.

    http://www.reneesgarden.com/

    Do several sowings, one of which is timed for mid summer (late Julyish here in the far north.) The late one is the one that's usually ready at the same time as the tomatoes, but if it's a hot summer and the tomatoes are earlier, you're covered by one of the earlier sowings as well. Also pinching off developing flower stalks may hold the cilantro a little longer before it peters out.



  12. #72
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    My problem with salsa is that the cilantro is ready first, then garlic, then the tomatoes, then the onions. How do people time it properly? I guess I can stagger the cilantro, but there is a problem with the tomatoes and onions being ready....sigh....it never works for me. Usually the cilantro bolts mid-May and the tomatoes aren't ready until late July...
    would not bother me, since I really do not care for cilantro myself.
    but yeah, staggered sewing.

    Plus, you can go really nuts on the one or two special tomato plants, pick an early variety and pamper it,surround it with wall of water and other frost protection and you can harvest your first tomatoes pretty early!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    would not bother me, since I really do not care for cilantro myself.
    but yeah, staggered sewing.

    Plus, you can go really nuts on the one or two special tomato plants, pick an early variety and pamper it,surround it with wall of water and other frost protection and you can harvest your first tomatoes pretty early!
    I am determined to try staggered cilantro this year but I am always foiled for some reason or another (laziness). And usually I have a ton of volunteers from last year's seeds and get early cilantro with nothing else ready. Then I forget about it.

    But I did buy an early type tomato so I am hoping it grows well - Stupice - with a 65 day season....we'll see!



  14. #74
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    I am determined to try staggered cilantro this year but I am always foiled for some reason or another (laziness). And usually I have a ton of volunteers from last year's seeds and get early cilantro with nothing else ready. Then I forget about it.

    But I did buy an early type tomato so I am hoping it grows well - Stupice - with a 65 day season....we'll see!
    mark down your sewing schedule on the calendar! like a new batch every two weeks!
    But be warned, the early early tomato harvest is time and labor intensive!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
    Posts
    4,114

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    My problem with salsa is that the cilantro is ready first, then garlic, then the tomatoes, then the onions. How do people time it properly? I guess I can stagger the cilantro, but there is a problem with the tomatoes and onions being ready....sigh....it never works for me. Usually the cilantro bolts mid-May and the tomatoes aren't ready until late July...
    I blanch, skin, and peel tomatoes as they ripen and throw them in a bag in the freezer. When I've gotten my last tomatoes, I pull out all my freezer bags, thaw, and make salsa and spaghetti sauce. For the peppers, I clean them, cut them into slices and freeze them. For jalapenos and small peppers, I clean them and freeze them whole.

    I have to buy cilantro at the store as it isn't ready at the right time and I don't know if it'll freeze well. For onions, I've heard you can freeze them but I haven't tried yet. I do have bunching onions that work well in the spaghetti sauce, and they're ready at the right time.
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com



  16. #76
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2010
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    416

    Default Early Spring planting??

    Are things like chard, lettuces, and kale more cold weather? As I live in a townhouse, I typically plant a container garden on my back porch that consists of lots of herbs, tomatoes, sweet peppers and jalapenos. This year I would like to try out some leafy green stuff

    How early can I plant them down here in NC? Does anyone have a guideline for temps/timing? I've always done plants from the farmers market. Should I do seeds for the green stuff instead?

    Also, I do have room to build one small raised bed. Probably 6x3 or 4. Does anyone have a how to?



  17. #77
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MtyMax View Post
    Are things like chard, lettuces, and kale more cold weather? As I live in a townhouse, I typically plant a container garden on my back porch that consists of lots of herbs, tomatoes, sweet peppers and jalapenos. This year I would like to try out some leafy green stuff

    How early can I plant them down here in NC? Does anyone have a guideline for temps/timing? I've always done plants from the farmers market. Should I do seeds for the green stuff instead?

    Also, I do have room to build one small raised bed. Probably 6x3 or 4. Does anyone have a how to?
    yes, lettuce is cool weather. kale for cold, like fall into winter. some kinds don't taste really good until they had some frost.

    You can go with the plants from the market, no doubt, but you can pick up a pack of seeds nearly anywhere, really no need to get too fancy, unless the one thing you want is not available.
    letuce can go out pretty early, as soon as you don't expect any frost.
    Pf course, with containers, you can cover them easily or move them inside. I am thinking about march, but it could be a bit later for you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  18. #78
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
    Posts
    4,114

    Default

    It apparently doesn't take much to make me happy. I went into my seed starting room (aka spare bedroom/guest room) to check on the seeds. And I have sprouts now! I just love it when they start peeking above the soil.

    I have tons more to plant tonight, too.
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com



  19. #79
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirljenn View Post
    It apparently doesn't take much to make me happy. I went into my seed starting room (aka spare bedroom/guest room) to check on the seeds. And I have sprouts now! I just love it when they start peeking above the soil.

    I have tons more to plant tonight, too.
    yep, a momentous moment!

    I have 8 small trays on top of my fridge. Need to make room soon in a lighted area for them!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  20. #80
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    I learned to not even THINK about sowing any indoor seeds until mid-February. My earlier eagerness had me transplanting tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, herbs, flowers, etc., etc., into larger & larger pots that quickly had me running out of room & fluorescent lights. It was a nightmare, since my traditional plant-out date since I was a little sprout myself has always been Mothers Day weekend.

    So now I hold myself back as much as possible. I am planning to do a bit of "winter sowing" very soon for a few things - Italian Flat-Leaf Parsley, "Bright Lights" Swiss Chard, some Kale varieties, hardy lettuce, flowers, etc., etc. For those not familiar with the technique, this is where you sow seed in a covered but vented plastic container outdoors. The seeds easily survive the freezing/thawing cycles, since that's what they'd normally do if self-sowing outside. It frees up a lot of room indoors, & requires very little if any care after the initial sowing.

    Since I buy filtered water for my coffeemaker, the gallon plastic bottles make absolutely perfect winter-sowing containers. Nothing goes to waste around here.



Similar Threads

  1. 2013 EAP Applications Open January 15, 2013
    By PonyPenny in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jan. 15, 2013, 10:37 AM
  2. Replies: 15
    Last Post: Jan. 1, 2013, 07:39 PM
  3. Replies: 41
    Last Post: Sep. 1, 2012, 01:36 AM
  4. Replies: 22
    Last Post: Sep. 28, 2010, 02:48 PM
  5. Gardening 101
    By SmokenMirrors in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 115
    Last Post: May. 5, 2009, 09:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •