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  1. #61
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    Sep. 13, 2012
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    Awww, geez. Nigel, you will be GREATLY missed. Rolex just won't be the same again.



  2. #62
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    Nov. 13, 2002
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    I realized another thing I will about Nigel no longer being there- no more Nigel in the mounted Pony Club games!!!
    There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.(Churchill)



  3. #63
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    May. 23, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by flutie1 View Post
    Mike Tucker is an excellent announcer. My question is why do we have to have a Brit announcer? Rolex is an American competition.
    Brian is an American and in my opinion is the best in the country.
    Additionally, Brian has served as cross country control for many years. If only for this, I think he deserved a shot.
    But these are only opinions. I'm sure Rolex will go on despite some people's disappointment.

    I agree with all but Mike. Brian would have been my first choice as he knows the job, the venue and, most importantly, he is familiar with most of the horse and rider combinations.



  4. #64
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    That's why I asked the question about why Mike Tucker and why he's seen as a way to 'grow' Rolex. I would think that an American event with mostly American competitors would have a home-side announcer.

    Mike Tucker is the BBC's equestrian guy, and he's also the voice on the DVDs of Badminton and Burghley. I was wondering if there was something in those connections that the Rolex organizers wanted (for example, if he's a principal or under contract to the production companies behind these broadcasts).

    Or perhaps, in light of those Horse & Hound forum threads, this is another case of GB unloading their undesirables -- a la CMP -- on the unsuspecting, easily-seduced-by-accents Americans.



    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
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    Dec. 5, 2001
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    I will miss Nigel, and it won't be the same at all without him. I think I started going in 1981, my family started attending in 1978. I don't have any ill feeling towards Brian or Mike Tucker, I am sure they do a professional job. But it just will not be the same without the Voice Of Rolex. I do think that it was crummy that they fired him as late as they did with no heads up or warning. Even if the contract renews every January, and it's normal business to fire him that late, the Board could have shown some class by giving a bit of advance warning.



  6. #66
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    Feb. 22, 2000
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    If the Rolex organizers are going to fly people across the Atlantic to commentate,
    why can't it be Carl Hester and Pammy Hutton?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
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    Aug. 14, 2000
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    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    Maybe some of the Brits can answer this, since I've only heard Mike Tucker on either the BBC or the DVDs. Is he a popular onsite event announcer over there? Which ones does he do? I did a bit of googling and found where he had announced Galway Downs here in 2008. Is he their regular announcer? Is he the regular event announcer for other US events? If so, which ones?

    It's one thing to sit in a broadcast booth with a color man/commentator and a director, and tape delay to choose between all the cameras on course or to do after the fact announcing on DVDs: and it's something else entirely to be announcing the event on site live from multiple cameras without the luxury of a TV sized staff. There's no tape delay, and I suspect no separate director.

    So these questions:
    1) Is the announcer also reponsible for what comes up on the Jumbotrons?
    Who chooses which of the course cameras is shown at any particular time?

    2) How does the announcer get information about what's going on all over the course? Is that by radio as well as the course cameras? Who feeds the radio information to the announcer and who decides what to say when?

    The announcer at Rolex is just as important for keeping the event running smoothly as s/he is for informing the spectators of what's going on as it happens. I know that fence judges and crossing guards rely on the announcer to give them heads up when a combination is nearing their areas. Sometimes it's just not possible to do it by sight, given terrain and locations.

    That's why I'm asking about Tucker as a live/on site event announcer.

    If this is tacky, I'm not sorry.

    Quote Originally Posted by JER View Post
    That's why I asked the question about why Mike Tucker and why he's seen as a way to 'grow' Rolex. I would think that an American event with mostly American competitors would have a home-side announcer.

    Mike Tucker is the BBC's equestrian guy, and he's also the voice on the DVDs of Badminton and Burghley. I was wondering if there was something in those connections that the Rolex organizers wanted (for example, if he's a principal or under contract to the production companies behind these broadcasts).

    Or perhaps, in light of those Horse & Hound forum threads, this is another case of GB unloading their undesirables -- a la CMP -- on the unsuspecting, easily-seduced-by-accents Americans.

    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  8. #68
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    Apr. 2, 2009
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    North Carolina
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    viney, he announces Badminton w/ Ian Stark according to the H&H links, although apparently he is not so good at facts.



  9. #69
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    Aug. 11, 2000
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    Chantilly,va.
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    Just p*ssing on fence posts.

    And more money goes into O'Connor pockets.

    Janie and Mike E S both announced their retirements before WEG to take place after WEG. I certainly don't blame Alltech for that. Mike Tucker is the guy who did the BBC commentary for the Olympics and could not stop babbling. He's married to eventing dressage dragon, Angela Tucker. One speculates that she'll be on the ground jury this year.
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/im...quote_icon.png Originally Posted by yellowbritches http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/im...post-right.png
    I think that's a little unfair, considering Brian has nothing to do with anything other than that he is a damn fine announcer and xc control. I'm pretty sure there isn't some giant O'Connor Cooperation/crime ring that he's part of along with his brother and sister in law.

    I actually like Mike Tucker, but it'll be sad to see Nigel go.
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  10. #70
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    Oct. 12, 2004
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    Ontario, Canada
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    So nice of you to log on and clarify, Nigel!
    We will continue to enjoy your commentary at Red Hills and Richland Park for sure!!!



  11. #71
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    Feb. 4, 2001
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    Sheridan, IN
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    Maybe some of the Brits can answer this, since I've only heard Mike Tucker on either the BBC or the DVDs. Is he a popular onsite event announcer over there? Which ones does he do? I did a bit of googling and found where he had announced Galway Downs here in 2008. Is he their regular announcer? Is he the regular event announcer for other US events? If so, which ones?

    It's one thing to sit in a broadcast booth with a color man/commentator and a director, and tape delay to choose between all the cameras on course or to do after the fact announcing on DVDs: and it's something else entirely to be announcing the event on site live from multiple cameras without the luxury of a TV sized staff. There's no tape delay, and I suspect no separate director.

    So these questions:
    1) Is the announcer also reponsible for what comes up on the Jumbotrons?
    Who chooses which of the course cameras is shown at any particular time?

    2) How does the announcer get information about what's going on all over the course? Is that by radio as well as the course cameras? Who feeds the radio information to the announcer and who decides what to say when?

    The announcer at Rolex is just as important for keeping the event running smoothly as s/he is for informing the spectators of what's going on as it happens. I know that fence judges and crossing guards rely on the announcer to give them heads up when a combination is nearing their areas. Sometimes it's just not possible to do it by sight, given terrain and locations.

    That's why I'm asking about Tucker as a live/on site event announcer.

    If this is tacky, I'm not sorry.
    1). I don't know who exactly is responsible for what comes up on the jumbotron but I'll hazard a guess that it is somewhat scripted as to who rides when before XC starts and adapted as things evolve.

    2) the announcer sits in a little trailer with the live feeds going on in front of him. He also has a radio that is tuned to control, which Brian O'Connor does admirably.

    3). The fence judges have radios, which are tuned to control, they don't use the announcer for information. In addition, the course is divided into Areas, which have an area steward (or two or three), which act as overseers of the fence judges, crossing lanes, and all other happenings within their area.

    I kinda wonder if the majority of people would even notice the difference between Nigel and Michael, if they didn't know ahead of time.


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  12. #72
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    Aug. 14, 2000
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    So does control call each fence sequentially and say something like "#20 will be in your area in approximately x number of seconds"? I really don't know. I do know that the announcements of where a horse is on course are very helpful to crossing guards with no visibility in the approaching direction. The area stewards are very helpful in circumstances like that in trying to alleviate the problem, but sometimes the solutions don't work as well as hoped.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  13. #73
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Middleburg, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    So does control call each fence sequentially and say something like "#20 will be in your area in approximately x number of seconds"? I really don't know. I do know that the announcements of where a horse is on course are very helpful to crossing guards with no visibility in the approaching direction. The area stewards are very helpful in circumstances like that in trying to alleviate the problem, but sometimes the solutions don't work as well as hoped.
    ALL volunteers have radios and are tuned to the same channel. Each fence judge, steward, and, I assume, crossing guard, hear the progression of each horse, so they know when to blow whistles, shut crossings, etc.



  14. #74
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    Jul. 29, 2004
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    Colorado
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    So does control call each fence sequentially and say something like "#20 will be in your area in approximately x number of seconds"?
    I've never jump judged Rolex but all the events I've been a fence judge at, you call the horse/rider when they are through your fence. Some places want refusals called when they occur, others after the horse is past the fence. You listen to when the next expected rider is through the fence before yours. After a few horses you know about when they should show up and usually you can see them as well.

    Different places and size competitions will vary a bit in how they handle things but I've never been told by control about when a horse should show up at my fence.



  15. #75
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    Jul. 1, 1999
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    WV
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    I would think that an American event with mostly American competitors would have a home-side announcer.
    This was my point earlier. Nigel is a US citizen. He has been here in the states since the late 1960s, longer than many of us have been alive and way more than half his life!
    One thing you can give and still keep is your word.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #76
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    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
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    Default We'll miss you Nigel.

    And if you turn up anyway, let me be the first to buy you a shot at the bourbon barrel.

    Here's what I think. I don't think the PTB at EE had any idea of the importance of Nigel to most of us, his knowledge and skill at announcing the event. I think that they thought oh, some might boo hoo a bit, but I doubt they thought there would be such a hue and cry about it.

    The Original Batmobile was just sold at the Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale AZ. All week long, the knowledgable commentators thought that people were making too big of a fuss, it would likely only bring a couple hundred thousand or so from some Bat-Geek.

    It sold for 4.2 Million Dollars. Plus a 10% buyers fee.

    The commentators had egg on their faces because they had no idea just how much of an icon the car was to people of a certain age.

    My guess is EE also had no idea that some would simply bag going to Rolex because they decided to "go forward" with someone other than Nigel. They do not realize that his voice is an integral part of the event for many/most of us.

    Nigel is a class act. EE is a business. Often times, a business does not consider certain things to be as important to us as they actually are.

    Think New Coke people. The new announcer and sound system will either be just fine (but not Nigel) or it will be an epic fail.

    You can be sure that the new kids on the block will realize prior just exactly what kind of white-hot light they're under to get it right.

    We'll see.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
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    Feb. 4, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    So does control call each fence sequentially and say something like "#20 will be in your area in approximately x number of seconds"? I really don't know. I do know that the announcements of where a horse is on course are very helpful to crossing guards with no visibility in the approaching direction. The area stewards are very helpful in circumstances like that in trying to alleviate the problem, but sometimes the solutions don't work as well as hoped.
    Control is only heard from on the radio when there is a question or problem; the fence judges (and start) report on the horses progression, Control monitors and tracks any issues. If there is an issue Control deals with giving instruction to the area/fence where help is needed. The mounted stewards (which can see the horse coming) sound a whistle as the horse on course approaches, crossing lanes are closed until the horse passes. Honestly, the biggest general worry getting started is getting the galloping lanes opened & closed appropriately, the area stewards are very much on this before the first horse come through & checks to be sure all is going smoothly.

    There is a huge amount that goes into keeping everyone safe and informed at an event like Rolex--but the course gets information from Control, not the announcer, on the whole.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #78
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    Aug. 14, 2000
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    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    ALL volunteers have radios and are tuned to the same channel. Each fence judge, steward, and, I assume, crossing guard, hear the progression of each horse, so they know when to blow whistles, shut crossings, etc.
    Crossing guards at Rolex do not have radios--nor in most cases do they need them. It's a job that doesn't require much skill or knowledge, but you do have to have warning--enough to clear and close the crossing lanes. Usually sight is plenty adequate, but the lanes have occasionally been located in dips or close enough to the previous jump that you have to start the process when the rider gets past the one before that. In fact, that's probably normal. That's why the announcer is such a nice crutch. Relying on mounted outriders to signal helps but isn't foolproof. They move or get distracted.

    I'd say the guards never know what's going on except through the announcer. Once everything starts, the area stewards have a lot more to worry about than crossing guards.
    Last edited by vineyridge; Jan. 21, 2013 at 02:06 PM.
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  19. #79
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    Jun. 6, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post

    I'd say ..

    Is your opinion based on actual experience working at Rolex, or simply on the basis that you are smarter than everyone else?


    3 members found this post helpful.

  20. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    Crossing guards at Rolex do not have radios--nor in most cases do they need them. It's a job that doesn't require much skill or knowledge, but you do have to have warning--enough to clear and close the crossing lanes. Usually sight is plenty adequate, but the lanes have occasionally been located in dips or close enough to the previous jump that you have to start the process when the rider gets past the one before that. In fact, that's probably normal. That's why the announcer is such a nice crutch. Relying on mounted outriders to signal helps but isn't foolproof. They move or get distracted.

    I'd say the guards never know what's going on except through the announcer. Once everything starts, the area stewards have a lot more to worry about than crossing guards.
    As an area steward at Rolex I will say we do worry about the crossings once the event is started. We try to keep an eye on all aspects of safety/communication within our area and anticipate any area of trouble/congestion, address them and stay in touch with Control if we need them. That includes moving mounted stewards around so they have a better line of sight for a given crossing if needed. If the PA went down we could operate independently of it (given that the radios are still working). I'd hazard a guess that the PA on XC is the least important of any sort of communications to the actual running of the competition. It is much more important to the general crowd. The radios reporting in to Control are much, much more important.



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