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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
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    Charlottesville, VA
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    269

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    It sounds like you are pretty sure they were dogs, but we have a sheep farmer across from us who loses lambs (and occasionally a sheep) to the coyotes during daytime hours. I agree with a few others that suggest a donkey - if you can find one that will accept your sheep/lamb herd, it will likely keep dogs AND coyotes out of their pens. So so so sorry
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue


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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    24,351

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    Coyote are notorious lovers of lamb for dinner.

    However coyote know exactly how to kill their food. They don't keep attacking woolly areas (in order to make those areas bloody, a lot of chewing is needed to get through the wool), they don't leave any downed lambs without large chewed off chunks of food and they kill larger animals (like lamb or sheep) with a choke hold on the throat. Hers had no throat injuries.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  3. #23
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    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
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    269

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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    Coyote are notorious lovers of lamb for dinner.

    However coyote know exactly how to kill their food. They don't keep attacking woolly areas (in order to make those areas bloody, a lot of chewing is needed to get through the wool), they don't leave any downed lambs without large chewed off chunks of food and they kill larger animals (like lamb or sheep) with a choke hold on the throat. Hers had no throat injuries.
    Thank you for this... very good to know. I had no idea!
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,229

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    I think what MB describes is the difference between killing for sport and killing for meals. The dogs kill for sport, Coyotes have to eat.


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  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
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    7,414

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    I agree with Misty Blue, and Trubandloki, and there is definitely a difference between killing for food, and killing for fun. A hungry animal killing for food to live doesn't just maim an animal, and then leave it uneaten.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Thank you for this... very good to know. I had no idea!
    No problem!

    I think what MB describes is the difference between killing for sport and killing for meals. The dogs kill for sport, Coyotes have to eat.
    Yup. It's how wardens and/or ACO determine if animal attacks were from coyotes or dogs. Pet dogs often spree/pleasure/sport kill without eating much/any of the animal. Coyotes aren't risking being near humans for fun, they'll usually take the animal down as fast as possible and remove the animal/pieces of it to a safe location or eat as much of it as possible before hightailing it out of there. So they might grab the body/legs of an animal to injure/slow it down, but as soon as they can grab throat and squeeze, they do. So that would show throat injuries.

    And if nothing was eaten off or entrail removed, just massive inuries...then it was dogs.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    15,499

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    I'm so sorry.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    8,799

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    Very useful information MB. I'm sorry to have to learn it under these circumstances of course.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2008
    Posts
    2,947

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    So sorry!! Poor sheep.
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    3,148

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    Would it make sense to run a strand of electric tape a foot off the ground, a few feet outside your fence? I know our dogs hate getting shocked. I wonder if it would help protect your sheep.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,675

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    Get yourself a wild burro from the BLM and a Great Pyrenees, and a good rifle you can shoot from your porch.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
    Location
    Area 51
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    So sorry for your loss.
    Chicken Fancier

    "Mischief Managed!"



  13. #33
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    689

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    They'll be back.

    Do you have other neighbors with livestock? Maybe one with a flexible schedule and a good rifle will volunteer to spend the night looking over the pen?

    Collect the sheep so there is no collateral damage.

    It turns the stomach to come home to that.......



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
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    What do you mean "collect the sheep so there is no collateral damage"?

    Oh, you mean when the neighbor comes over, he should bring his sheep over, so he can watch over his flock while watching over yours.
    Gottcha.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
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    471

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    I am so sorry.



  16. #36
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    689

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    Fence them in a way that they won't be in the line of fire when the same dogs come back looking for them. If that is at all possible.

    These dogs have taken a liking to killing and maiming and will not stop on their own.



  17. #37
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    689

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chall View Post
    What do you mean "collect the sheep so there is no collateral damage"?

    Oh, you mean when the neighbor comes over, he should bring his sheep over, so he can watch over his flock while watching over yours.
    Gottcha.
    I wasn't giving advice to you. So whether you understand what I said or not is not my problem.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    I doubt that something that could clear the no climb, and has left no evidence of how they got in is stoppable with electric wire or any other way. I think tracking the dogs down, or trapping them is the only way to stop them. Anything big enough or with enough scope to clear the fence is going to be tough to stop. Some domestic breeds, like boxers are great jumpers, and something that could clear the fence is going to be hard to stop. A friend had a boxer that could go over his 10 foot privacy fence easily, so something like a wire no-climb would have been easy for him.

    I'm so sorry this happened to your animals, and you had to come home and find them like that.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  19. #39
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    May. 5, 2002
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    1,549

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    Thanks everybody for the good thoughts. There was a mix up with sheriff, etc, so we didn't get a trap delivered. Probably not until next week. We have the sheep confined to a small pen close to the house. They were in the pasture right behind the house before, so they were not far away, but now there is a couple extra fences for predators to get through. And our dog run is next to the pen. Unfortunately the dog is older and deaf, but she is a super watch dog so will alert us if she sees or smells something. Animal damage people came out and looked as well. They felt more signs of dog attack, but still not 100 percent sure. One set of tracks looked like dog, the other more like coyote. So we will try the traps and see if and what we get. The even more scary news we got from animal damage person was there has been a mountain lion in our area on an off. The sheep were not killed by lion, but I defintely worry about a lion going after my minis! He said he hadn't seen evidence of the lion in awhile, and it seems to be following the deer. Lets hope it stays that way. We have been so droughty here, wildlife is getting more desperate. So who knows, that could have caused coyotes to behave abnormal in their killing if they are desperate. Although there are so many feral cats in our neighborhood, I can't imagine a coyote being very hungry!



  20. #40
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    Jan. 19, 2011
    Location
    Coastal Marsh of Texas
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    Oh, I'm so sorry. It sounds like a dog attack though - for sport. Best of luck trapping them and yes, they will be back.



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