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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2012
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    119

    Default Ice/Cold therapy versus Back On Track products

    I have always cold hosed legs, iced legs and used poultice wraps to keep heat OUT of a horses legs. This always seems to work to keep tendons tight and to minimize stocking up at a show. Looking into the Back On Track products, I can understand how a warmed back would improve muscle relaxtion etc and make for a better ride... however the wraps for the legs dont make sense to me. In reading the descriptions on their website for the wraps, they use the ceramic powder to heat the legs, thus reducing swelling and increase circulation. What am I missing here? Can you use HEAT and/or COLD therapy and get the same results?
    Tinker Toy & Blue Bonnett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    Default

    If there is an actual traumatic injury, applying cold to the site first for 24 to 48 hours to reduce inflammation followed by the application of heat to increase circulation/reduce edema/improve healing is the approved, accepted protocol.

    if there is no actual trauma, it's unclear if applying cold is helpful at all- the cold is primarily intended to reduce circulation, thus reducing bleeding from trauma, and it also reduces damage from inflammation triggered by the injury.

    applying heat (either by applying BoT wraps or a poultice) increases circulation to the area, speeds healing of any minor damage, and reduces edema.

    thus if the horse wasn't injured and just finished a basic workout, slapping on BoT wraps may be more beneficial than cold-hosing or icing.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
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    6,703

    Default

    If it is cold, heat it. If it is hot cool it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2007
    Posts
    538

    Default

    Heat for muscle soreness. Ice for acute injury & removal of inflammation.

    I have a horse with some really bad backsoreness, particularly after XC or conditioning. The winning combination was heat before the work-out (BoT mesh sheet overnight & 3 old riding socks filled with rice heated up) & ice packs (peas) afterward.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2003
    Location
    MD
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    1,550

    Default

    I have a set of front wraps and I cant figure out which horses in my shedrow to use them on for the same confusion
    Race training and retraining Thoroughbreds.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    3,932

    Default

    I use the BOT wraps quite frequently and have not found them to get hot as in heating pad hot. My horses' legs actually feel quite cool under them.

    I have to admit though it is kinda funny now that you brought it up. When I work my driving horse, I put BOT quick wraps on him before work, work him in BOT polos half the time, and then when done, his legs get iced ice vibed technically.

    It really doesn't make a whole lot of sense now that I think about it, but it seems to work for us.
    Just because you’re afraid, doesn’t mean you’re in danger. Just because you feel alone, doesn’t mean nobody loves you. Just because you think you might fail, doesn’t mean you will.



  7. #7
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    I put BOT quick wraps on him before work, work him in BOT polos half the time, and then when done, his legs get iced ice vibed technically.
    kind of makes sense- keep the legs warm and with good circulation so ready to work, then do the work, and then after work, apply ice in case of any minor trauma that might have occurred during the work.

    I would think BoT leg wraps would work really well on "stocking up"- that's when fluid pools in the legs due to poor circulation/ lack of movement. The BoT wraps would improve circulation and thus stop the pooling of fluid.

    Mostly I think BoT technology works best on muscles, though, not tendons/ligaments. A BoT blanket helps the muscles be ready to work, and reduces pain/soreness after work.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    I find the BOT wraps work incredibly well on stocking up, but also on arthritic joints. I have an aged gelding that responds incredibly well BOT products on his arthritic joints.
    Just because you’re afraid, doesn’t mean you’re in danger. Just because you feel alone, doesn’t mean nobody loves you. Just because you think you might fail, doesn’t mean you will.



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