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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2010
    Location
    Mt. Pleasant, NC
    Posts
    11

    Default Help, Diagonals

    I have a hard time trying to pick up my diagonal. Is there any ways that can help? I need to feel it but I have a hard time. Like, sometimes when I am not trying I get it.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Location
    The Part of TN in the Wrong Time Zone
    Posts
    1,977

    Default

    There was literally just a question on this.
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...elp!-Diagonals
    .אני יכול לעשות הכל על ידי אלוהים



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2010
    Location
    Mt. Pleasant, NC
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Thank you.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2013
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Listen to his back legs! Also sneak a peak when you pick up a trot - post on the outside leg. If you don't get it, sit a beat and pick it up again. Your trainer can help you also.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2013
    Posts
    59

    Default

    I stand up when the outside leg comes forward, at least that is how I was taught. I dont always pick it up right away, but look down pretty much immediately to ensure I dont put the horse off balance. After a year of riding lessons, you'd think I wouldnt have to look at the outside leg anymore!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    Have someone tell you when you're on the correct diagonal, then look down to watch the outside shoulder - stand up when it goes forward, and learn what that looks like. Once you can identify it by looking, check and make sure it's correct, then spend time practicing - learn what it feels like when you're on the correct diagonal and when you're on the wrong one. The best way to tell is on a circle rather than a straight line, because it is harder for the horse to balance and move properly if you are posting with the wrong shoulder - it should feel rougher/bouncier and as if you are being pushed more towards the outside of the circle, if you're on the wrong diagonal. If you're on the correct diagonal, it will feel as if you are moving nicely and smoothly with the horse in the direction of travel.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Posts
    952

    Default

    I get in time with the rib cage as it swings and then post accordingly. Up as it starts to swing back towards the side you want to be in time with.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2011
    Location
    Zone 5
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Some ideas:

    Let your horse stretch and walk forward. While doing so, relax your body (especially your hips) and see if you can feel the motion. Imagine what the horse looks like when walking and trotting. There is some side to side motion as well as the forward and back motion. At the posting trot, you want to "rise and fall with the shoulder on the wall" but the important part is to sit when the inside hind leg is under the horse (which is also when the outside fore is back and under the horse). We look at the front shoulder since we can't look at the hind end easily but the hind end is the important part.

    When you think you have it, move up to the trot but sit the trot and feel it the same way as at the walk. Next, you can try to post but do so in either a circle or in the corner of the ring since it is easier to tell right from left when the horse is turning (because the outside legs have to cover more ground than the inside legs on a turn).

    Your goal shouldn't simply be to be able to pick up the correct diagonal. It should be to know what is going on underneath you at all times. When I leg a horse into a trot, I can immediately pick up the correct diagonal in the first step but it's because I already know where his legs are when I start.

    Practice. Then practice some more. Really try to visualize the horse and what he is doing while you feel what's going on underneath you. You'll get it but it takes time and practice!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
    Posts
    4,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post
    When I leg a horse into a trot, I can immediately pick up the correct diagonal in the first step but it's because I already know where his legs are when I start.
    This is how it is for me too, except that I wouldn't say that I really even "think" about where my horse's legs are. I just pick up the trot and am immediately on the correct diagonal every time. If for some reason I WANT to pick up the wrong diagonal, I have to really think hard about it (and it feels extremely wrong to post on the wrong diagonal if I am doing so to try to figure out an unsoundness or something).

    Anyway, the OP really got me thinking! I honestly can't remember learning my diagonals (I guess I would have been about five years old at the time). So, now I'm sitting here trying to think about what I feel when I pick up the trot that allows me to start posting on the correct diagonal immediately. I guess what it comes down to is that I *do* know when the outside front leg is about to come off the ground into the trot stride, and that's when I start the "up" part of my post.

    So maybe try doing a lot of walk to trot transitions and really think about where the horse's legs are in the moment where the horse goes from walk to trot. I wonder if watching horses pick up a trot might also help.

    In the end, it really is a "feel" thing...hard to explain, but once you've got it, I think you've got it forever.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2008
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    5,871

    Default

    Coming down to the trot from a canter, I always pick up the correct diagonal; noticed in my lesson yesterday when my horse landed on the wrong lead that I picked up the wrong diagonal automatically as he came down to a trot. So for me, it seems to be easy to feel the movement and find the correct diagonal naturally if I'm feeling the canter. That then translates to sitting trot; I can now feel the diagonal much more easily after sitting for a few beats.
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