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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
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    4,064

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    Just as some of the others... Rise and fall with the leg against the wall!
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,197

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    I was taught to look at the outside leg.
    I sometimes still have trouble feeling diagonals on certain horses. Most of the time I'm good, and I'll just glance down to double check.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/NBChoice http://nbchoice.blogspot.com/
    The New Banner's Choice- 1994 ASB Mare
    Dennis The Menace Too- 1999 ASB Gelding
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2003
    Location
    Hillsborough, NC
    Posts
    1,394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wellspotted View Post
    I was taught outside fore, long ago when hunter-jumper was called forward seat.

    But I wonder why aren't riders taught feel from the first? If it's all about developing one's seat, why not teach riding from your seat from the first?
    I actually was taught from the beginning to feel what the hindquarters were doing. To this day (decades later) I would not be able to figure out where the shoulder of the horse would be for the rise, except by working it through logically based on being in the "sit" phase when the inside hind is on the ground.
    Only one cat - must not be totally crazy yet!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wellspotted View Post
    Just checked out 3 British Dressage videos on youtube, all 3 were rising with the outside fore.
    In England I was taught to watch the inside shoulder but to sit as it goes forward, ( so you are trotting on the same diagonal as in the usa, you are just taught to look at the inside one)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,431

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    Outside leg for me (hunter/jumper barn).
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,641

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    UP with the outside leg. I can't feel it unless the horse is really off balance, but when I switch from left to right, I know that I have to sit two beats. I switch automatically right to left, but left to right messes me up. Who knows?
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    224

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    When the inside hind is forward, you should be up. If you're going down while the inside hind is moving forward you'll be popped back out of the saddle a little bit.

    My trainer was a huge advocate of "feel" and believed that "rise and fall with the leg on the wall" caused riders to develop bad habits with looking down. She was right, because I secretly used that method and now I have horrible habits of looking down!


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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2012
    Location
    South Central PA
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    129

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    I was taught to watch the outside leg (hunter/jumper barn) and I still double check myself visually within the first few steps but its barely noticeable. I've been on a horse or two where even my trainer couldn't feel the difference so it taught me to always check.
    Telling a worrier to relax is counterproductive. Then we worry about relaxing.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2007
    Posts
    966

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    Quote Originally Posted by chisamba View Post
    In England I was taught to watch the inside shoulder but to sit as it goes forward, ( so you are trotting on the same diagonal as in the usa, you are just taught to look at the inside one)
    This is how I was taught. I was about 12 or 13, and I still remember what my trainer said:"When the inside front leg goes down, your butt goes up."



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    Upperville
    Posts
    305

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    I was taught with the outside. BUT the lesson horse I rode had a very long thick mane so when we were going to the left I had a hard time seeing so I checked the inside leg going that direction. Even after I moved on from that horse I always checked the left leg



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 1999
    Location
    Belchertown, MA
    Posts
    695

    Default Really Renea?

    Yowsa...

    "Feeling your diagonal is ideal, but I would rather a rider take 5-10 seconds to glance with their eyes and be sure of themself then waste a whole straightaway trying to feel".

    That is crazy! 5-10 seconds is a lifetime. I think you mean 5-10 mili- seconds!

    I have to disagree with the whole looking down technique though. Once learned that way it is HARD to learn how to feel and not to look down. I tell my riders, you don't have time to look down! As the great Jack LeGoff always said - if you look down, point of reference is lost for track and pace. Who wants that? No high level rider can afford that and low level riders even less so!

    Take the time with your students and teach them to learn the feel of what each leg/shoulder is doing at each gait and it will be automatic for life - both diagonals and leads.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    254

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    Outside leg, hunt seat.
    Lately somehow I've started picking up the wrong diagonal and it is mortifying



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SFBay
    Posts
    1,307

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    Outside leg. I still remember the horse I was riding when I *got* diagonals and could feel them. He was some random Saddlebred-y thing named Two Story (yes, he was tall).

    It's interesting, though, I don't remember being overtly taught how to feel them but it came pretty early on to me even when I was a very novice young rider riding camp string horses and horse camp. And since I don't have natural feel (or ability, sadly!) it's funny that I at least picked up diagonals quickly!

    I've had one or two horses who, for whatever reason, I've had to check on - mainly tiny strided horses with smooth trots!



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2000
    Posts
    3,147

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    rise & fall with the leg on the "wall"

    When my daughter was little, she'd over hear me saying this to students (along with eyes up, heels down) and we would hear her repeating it in her little 3-4 year old sing-song voice. funny stuff (but probably not unless it's your kid doing it - hahaha)



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2008
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    1,694

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    Outside leg, hunter/jumper barn. I can feel them on most horses but not my own. I feel for the inside hind pushing my seatbone forward......plus I pretty much always pick up the wrong one when I start trotting, so I normally switch on the next stride.

    I teach my students to glance down at the outside shoulder but as soon as they're stable enough I have them close their eyes for a few steps. Works like a charm to teach feel.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
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    2,896

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    I was taught outside leg...but after a brief period I could feel them very reliably even though I was only about 5 at the time...it just felt wrong when I was on the incorrect one.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2006
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    on and off the bit
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    4,039

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    It does to me too, and I think it's partly because the inside hind is pushing me towards the rail, or rather towards the outside, and that feels more correct. It is easier for me tracking left than tracking right, not sure why.
    Founder of the People Who Prefer COTH Over FB Clique
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  18. #38
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    507

    Default

    Outside. my first coach taught western mostly, but taught some "english" on her hunt-seat horses.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,157

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    Outside leg, taught by multiple saddleseat eq. instructors at various places. I usually start by feel, but do a super fast eyeball check.

    I never notice if someone is on the wrong diagonal unless I am specifically thinking about it.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    518

    Default

    I was taught to follow the outside leg.



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