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  1. #1
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    Default Mid Atlantic Morgan Sale

    Has anyone been to the Mid Atlantic Morgan Breeders Sale? I know a very sweet horse who is going to be sold there. He's pretty fried from showing. I'm afraid he will end up as an Amish driving horse. Please someone tell me that he has a good chance to go to a good home?
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp



  2. #2
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    If he's fried from showing, he'll probably enjoy being a road horse. Seriously. I know of several ex-show horses that were basket cases that were quite happy going mindlessly down the road without any pressure. The Harrisburg and Ashland sales are generally pretty good sales.


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by red mares View Post
    If he's fried from showing, he'll probably enjoy being a road horse. Seriously. I know of several ex-show horses that were basket cases that were quite happy going mindlessly down the road without any pressure. The Harrisburg and Ashland sales are generally pretty good sales.
    Amish road horse? I haven't seen very many Amish horses that look like they enjoy their jobs and the care isn't typically the best... and then when the breakdown most get an all expenses paid trip to Canada or Mexico.

    OP- I hope the horse finds a good home.
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
    http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
    John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
    Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma


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  4. #4
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    I can't answer the question as I've never been, but I looked up the sale online and I must say I am really surprised at the number of really nice show horses that are in the mix with the Amish horses. I am curious as to the kind of buyers the auction attracts. Do people who want to purchase show horses buy at auctions? Or do they end up as cart horses? I have to agree with the poster above that said most cart horses don't look very happy. I realize this may sound naive, but I am disturbed at the thought of someone dumping the horse they've showed for the last however many years off to some unknown fate.


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  5. #5
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    I have never been to the auction but I did look through the whole catalog of sales horses and stallions and it certainly had me drooling!! The two Stonecroft Masquerade babies...ahhh be still my heart.
    I know I can't go this year, but the auction will definitely be on my calendar for next year- way better than the Horse Expo!!
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  6. #6
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    Very high chance he'll end up in an amish home. I'd guess the consignors are maybe 50-50 amish-english, but the buyers are mostly amish at this sale. Lots of nice horses go thru the sale, its a great place to pick up a deal.


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  7. #7
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    Selling to the Amish is kind of the dirty little secret of the show Morgan world, for fried ex-show horses that are not going to be easy to sell privately. Former National Champions have ended up at these auctions, sometimes only a few months after winning their championship! The Amish like fast, hot horses.

    My mare's paternal grand-dam came from one of these sales, I am pretty sure Mid-Atlantic. She was a fried former park harness horse who'd been turned out in a field for a year or two. She was drugged for the sale, and luckily my mare's breeders saw the good horse that was underneath all the crazy. It took over a year for them to train her to walk quietly under saddle!
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  8. #8
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    So what can I do? I don't have the money to buy him and board him there. I can't stand the thought of him going from the frying pan into the Amish fire. I am sick over this. I can't believe there is nothing I can do for him.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.K.Smith View Post
    Amish road horse? I haven't seen very many Amish horses that look like they enjoy their jobs and the care isn't typically the best... and then when the breakdown most get an all expenses paid trip to Canada or Mexico.

    OP- I hope the horse finds a good home.
    I stand by it. I took my trainer horse shopping in Amish land in IN and he was impressed by the horses on the road. Shocked by the semis blowing by horses and no one getting upset, but generally impressed by the condition of horses. I have seen several show horses who were unsafe under saddle just chill going down the road. Some were picked up by trainers again and went back in the show ring.

    OP, this probably sounds harsh, but I wouldn't lose a whole lot of sleep over it. Even if your friend's horse is sold to an Amishman, he'll probably still have pretty good home. If you PM me, I can send you some pics of my Amish friend's horses. BTW, his son left the Church 3 or 4 years ago; he still has his buggy horse and didn't sell it to a Canadian meatpacker.


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  10. #10
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    ^^^ This. Honestly those who bash Amish horses, how many of those horses have you "really" seen? They aren't all booted up and blanketed from tail to tip of ears, and they don't have fancy long tails dragging three feet behind them, but I'd say a lot of them are happier horses because they are allowed to be horses. Many of them are well trained, solid equine citizens. Of course there are bad apples in every tree but many of Amish folks are proud and knowledgeable horse people who love a nice pony to drive to churches too.


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
    ^^^ This. Honestly those who bash Amish horses, how many of those horses have you "really" seen? They aren't all booted up and blanketed from tail to tip of ears, and they don't have fancy long tails dragging three feet behind them, but I'd say a lot of them are happier horses because they are allowed to be horses. Many of them are well trained, solid equine citizens. Of course there are bad apples in every tree but many of Amish folks are proud and knowledgeable horse people who love a nice pony to drive to churches too.

    I completely agree with MKSmith. We both live in the heart of Amish country just south of Lancaster, PA- so yeah, I see Amish buggies daily. Heck, I was just in line behind one in the drive thru at the bank a few minutes ago. Around here a sound and in good flesh buggy horse is a rarity indeed. Most of them range from a bit off to major head bobbing, three legged- but heck, they're still out there pounding the pavement. The other day at the grocery store- horse is tied outside to the tie rail, totally steamed up- it's pouring rain/ sleeting, but yet there's no cooler or blanket on that horse and he's shaking violently. The kids INSIDE the buggy waiting- you guess it, they are bundled up under a horse cooler- nice, huh?
    I'm not opposed to a horse working hard and not being pampered, heck I do endurance and I ask a lot out of my horses. But in turn those horses need at least basic care. I know there are some Amish out there that are truly horseman- I broke some Morgans for an Amishman that wanted a dressage background on some of his horses to make them more marketable to the English and his horses were excellently cared for. Unfortunately they seem to be the exception rather than the rule.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain


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  12. #12
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    tabula rashah, I'm sure you can find the same just about anywhere in the country. They are not just out in the open for you to see. At least many of Amish folks are very knowledgeable horse people, which can't be said about many of the rest of the country.


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  13. #13
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    OP maybe you can "out" the horse you are worried about here on COTH. Maybe somebody will snap him up at the sale?



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
    tabula rashah, I'm sure you can find the same just about anywhere in the country. They are not just out in the open for you to see. At least many of Amish folks are very knowledgeable horse people, which can't be said about many of the rest of the country.
    So since there is abuse/ neglect that occurs in other disciplines, the Amish have a pass to go full steam ahead? That make no sense at all.
    Spend just one day at the New Holland sale- one day- and I bet you would change your tune.
    Honestly, I'd put a horse down before I would turn it over to being an Amish buggy horse.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    So since there is abuse/ neglect that occurs in other disciplines, the Amish have a pass to go full steam ahead? That make no sense at all.
    Spend just one day at the New Holland sale- one day- and I bet you would change your tune.
    Honestly, I'd put a horse down before I would turn it over to being an Amish buggy horse.
    Give me a break. Try to get more mature and rational will you?

    Put down your horse. Don't turn it over to Amish. That is you choice. You don't think I care do ya?


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  16. #16
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    So would I.
    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    So since there is abuse/ neglect that occurs in other disciplines, the Amish have a pass to go full steam ahead? That make no sense at all.
    Spend just one day at the New Holland sale- one day- and I bet you would change your tune.
    Honestly, I'd put a horse down before I would turn it over to being an Amish buggy horse.


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  17. #17
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    I understand that the prices were good today. The horse I was concerned about went to a private home. I am relieved.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp


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  18. #18
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    I know there are good Amish out there, BUT the majority of them in my area- do not take good care of their horses... ribby, lame... often head bobbing lame, huffing and puffing from working too hard in 90 degree 90% humidity days, bits ripped through mouths, sides heaving from working... working... working and then trying to catch their breath as they're at the feed store with sweat dripping off of them... cool off... what's that... spooking as semis fly by inches from them... yank... yank... yank... sores from ill fitting collars, and stalls are often filled deep in solid manure... oh yeah and then at the end of the road is New Holland. If you've never had the experience of visiting New Holland... it is an experience.

    I will FOREVER have ingrained in my head what happened many years ago-

    Powl's feed... waiting for my grain to be loaded...I watched a thin bay Amish horse trotting towards the store on the road... it is practically bent in a U shape avoiding contact with the bit that is pulled 3/4 of the way through it's mouth... the horse is terrified of the traffic and spooks at every vehicle that goes by. I watch as the Amish man pulls up "parks his horse" and gets out and goes in the store. Horse is drenched in sweat, it is a hot day. The horse's sides are heaving back and forth, back and forth as it tries to catch its breath. Sweat is pouring off of it and the horse is steaming in the summer heat. The Amish man hadn't even given the horse the luxury of walking a few feet on the road. Amish man gets a few hundred pounds of grain which are tossed into the buggy. Horse flinches with each bag. Then as quickly as he arrived the Amish man is driving the horse back out onto the road. The horse never even caught his breath and he's back on the road in the heat... terrified. I will never forget that horse. I wish I had my own farm at that point and had the balls to say, "how much?" and the money to pay for it. But I didn't.

    It was almost a surreal experience... like... did that really just happen?

    I can't speak for anybody else, but that is NOT my idea of good horse care and appropriate treatment.

    Is that a rarity? An exception to the rule? Any educated horseman/woman who spends any amount of time observing the Amish in this area can validate many times over the lame horses, the skinny horses, and the overworked horses.

    And yes, I'm with tabula rashah- I'd euthanize before sending mine to be an Amish buggy horse. It is a running joke in this neck of the woods that we threaten our horses with "I'll send you to the Amish!!!" and I can't tell you the number of times I've seen Amish horses and gone home and hugged my own and told them how lucky they are.

    I have absolutely no problem with horses working for a living... but I do have a big problem with outright abuse that is never even addressed because of "religious freedoms"-- as if it is a free pass to beat your horses, wife, and kids.

    I will never, as long as I live forget that one Amish horse at Powl's... he's probably dead now, and for that poor horse, death is a better place than the Hell he lived as an Amish horse.

    Good Amish horsemen are out there, but there are far too few of them.
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
    http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
    John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
    Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptownevt View Post
    I understand that the prices were good today. The horse I was concerned about went to a private home. I am relieved.
    I'm very happy that the horse went to a good home!
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
    http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
    John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
    Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma


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  20. #20
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    I'm jumping on the "I'd never sell my horse to the local Amish" wagon. My daughter's Morgan was a buggy horse at one point in his life. Is he bomb proof on the road? Absolutely. Was he sore all over, headshy to the point you can't paste him with anything and had a scar on his tongue that looks like it was almost cut in half? Absolutely. Very rarely will you see the local Amish around here caring for their horses very well. Ever see a horse strapped tight to a tree to get shoes put on? I have. Ever see a skinny, lame horse tied to a hitching rail in freezing rain with no cover? I have. Ever see a frothing, foam covered, sweaty horse headbobbing lame and trotting it's butt off up a steep steep hill on an incredibly hot, humid summer day? I have. I think if you're around the country Amish and not the touristy areas you are more prone to see them treat their horses much more harshly. I'm SURE there are some around who treat their horses well, would I take the chance that my horse would find them in the community? No way.
    Kerri


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