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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,259

    Default I've got a possum in my tack room...

    I went to feed my cats this evening and heard something behind me. Possum in the corner. Fun.

    I went inside to grab a gun, and my dad (who owns the farm) said no way, can't shoot him inside a room. So I went and tried to shoo him out with a broom, but he's in a corner with shelves on both walls and can't get out without coming at me. He bit at the broom and hissed.

    I left him in there for an hour or so, thinking he would leave. Nope. I fed my cats in the garage, but now they're back outside. (My cats are barn cats and not allowed in the house).

    If he's still in there in a few hours, how do I get him out? I don't have a trap anymore, but I can get one in the morning if need be.

    I got all horse and cat feed out. How do you get these buggers out?! (Tack room is normally shut, and will not be left open again!)
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    108

    Default

    You need to shoo him in the direction you want him to go, however, keep all critters locked up and away, while you do this. Possums carry very nasty diseases that can infect horses and other animals. You also need a safe barrier between yourself and the possum. My suggestion would be a huge piece of plywood to use as a barricade between you and it, or, a huge piece of cardboard (from a huge box). Make as much noise as possible to encourage it to move away from you and direct it out the door.
    After it's gone, you need to be sure there is no urine or feces left behind, so use a 10% bleach solution on where he was, just to be safe. Hopefully he won't play possum, but, if he sees a way out of the room, meaning you sidle along the walls, not blocking the exit, he should choose to leave.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,259

    Default

    I've treated two horses for EPM so I'm eager to get this sucker OUT! (I would prefer to shoot him, but looks like that wont be happening).

    Ill try to put a piece of plywood between me nd the possum. It's so tricky because he has to come toward me to get to the door! He seems scared in place right now cause he will NOT leave that corner...
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    108

    Default

    Well, wear some tall, thick boots (you do NOT want to get clawed or bit). and try sticking to the wall. You could also try flapping a large towel at him, once you get to the side, which might encourage him to flee.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,844

    Default

    Well...I got a skunk out by spraying above him with horse fly spray, and it worked great. Maybe you could try that.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,259

    Default

    Oh jetsmom, that's do-able! I can kinda get above him and either spray him or really try to push him out with the broom. I didn't even think of that!

    I'm impressed you got a skunk out without getting sprayed!!
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,099

    Default

    Well, the way I did it with my former BO's possum in her barn office, where she left cat food out and the door open, inviting possums and coons to come on in, was that I got a plastic trash can, a big one, and pushed the possum into the can with a broom. Then we put possum in a dog carrier, and the BO's husband relocated said possum down the road.

    The BO's husband was actually going to shoot the possum in the office with a rifle! In the barn, right across from where my horse was standing in his stall. Yankees are so clueless! Unlike coons, possums won't attack you when cornered. You just want to be careful of their teeth when putting them into a container. Every southern woman who was raised with bantam chickens knows how to get rid of possums. Dogs are the best defense to possums and coons.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    558

    Default

    put a hav a heart or live trap in there with some nice stinky canned catfood in it, trap the bugger and relocate him.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    4,496

    Default

    I imagined the opening line of a country song, when I read "I've got a possum in my tack room".
    Thank you, I needed a laugh tonight!

    Honestly "playing possum" is a well earned colloquialism. They are actually quite the wusses as long as you don't get close enough to them that they can bite.

    They are more aggressive when they have baby "possums" in tow so do be careful, they are disease carriers.

    Shooting one in a tack room seems like a ridiculous proposition to me.

    When I was a child and our neighbour called the police (we never understood why the situation was "police worthy") because there was a large rattlesnake in the living room, the police swooped in and shot that rattler with their .357 revolver in the living room , made a big mess and hole in the floor.. NOT necessary!
    Swish them away with something, a broom works well for snakes and a towel is a good idea for "possums". They are pests and disease carriers and "possum" avoidence and control is important.

    I agree, dog is the best preventative.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2012
    Posts
    488

    Default

    I come more from the "trap 'em and shoot them" club...due to the diseases they carry, i choose not to "relocate" a pest...JMHO


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2011
    Posts
    1,395

    Default

    Use a big snow shovel and scoop him up. Toss him outside and chase his sorry butt away with a broom.

    O's put up a big fuss. But generally they do not get truly hostile. They give up and play opossum first.

    Do not leave catfood out at night. It is like o crack. Feed the cats earlier.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
    Location
    Area 51
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Yankees are so clueless!
    *seriously?*


    I had a possum in my barn not too long ago. It took two people to corral him and direct him outside. Luckily our barn also is a storage area and I found the perfect sized piece of plywood to barricade a "chute" type obstacle and successfully ran him outside. We just went slow, it never played possum, and actually can run pretty fast--I was surprised! Good luck to you!
    I LOVE my Chickens!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    I may be a clueless Yankee, but I value my dogs too highly to sic them on a possum. Live trap, then take outside and shoot. Sorry, possum. There are more where you came from you vile, EPM-carrying vermin. Stay away from my barn.

    ETA that although we are surrounded by possums, they do avoid my barn because a dog lives in there. The sweetest, most passive pansy of a dog, it's true, but just her mere presence keeps the foxes, possums, and raccoons away. Worth her weight in gold.
    Click here before you buy.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,259

    Default

    I sure wasn't going to take a .357 or other large gun in there! I was thinking more of a pellet gun, maybeee a .22. The walls in there are plywood...I wasn't worried about a small hole in the wall! (Horses were out!)

    Possum finally decided to leave on his own, but I think I'll be setting some traps soon. They are nasty little things....
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    You could try to shoo him into a big garbage can.

    Then you can shoot him in the can.

    If you let it go, it will come back, or be somebody else's problem. Possums are walking and potential EPM bombs.

    Those things are nasty. I hate they hiss, drool. ICK.

    I would have shot that sucker in the tack room.

    From my experience in shooting them, they are hard to kill. IOW be prepared for it to squirm for a time. They are nasty, and the smell BAD. Any poop remove and toss in the trash.

    I sure would let you borrow one of my many traps. The traps are not expensive. Can get them from TSC. TSC is open on sundays. Should have at least one on hand.

    Good luck.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,400

    Default

    If you don't have a suitable dog, the trash can method works.

    At my old farm I was startled by a possum in a nearly empty feed can. I slapped a cover on the can and called the dog. When I tipped the can over the dog made quick work of the possum, that dog didn't care if it played dead! Obviously we praised the dog, and for weeks/months after she made it her work to find any possum on the property and kill it. My Shar-peis weren't as fun- they gave up when the possum played dead- and I'd have to call in the "real" dog to do the deed. Normally I'm a live and let live person, but I'm not taking chances with EPM.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2012
    Location
    SE VA
    Posts
    50

    Default

    If this happens is KY, you can call the Turtle Man. . .

    He has a show on Animal Planet (?) and he catches them with his bare hands. And he catches snapping turtles in the most disgusting ponds. . . and snakes. . . and, well, anything.

    Worth watching a time or two; definately entertaining!! And . . . you will sit there shaking your head in amazement or disbelief.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
    Location
    Zone IV/Area III
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    story time:

    my mom walked into her house (in the city) and went to the kitchen...where her cat and his new friend, mr. possum, were eating together out of the cat food bowl...(came in through kitty door)

    not sure how she got him out, but i could only imagine!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
    Posts
    4,448

    Default

    Manage matters by making sure they never arise. As in, don't leave cat or dog food around to entice unwanted critters.

    Had one get in the barn, at the end of the aisle near a frozen-in door one time years ago. Big boy. He climbed, he hissed, he showed me his big yugly teeth. I harassed him with a broom enough to really piss him off--and left the hay barn door open.

    Yep--left on his own.

    And that was the end of the cat food.

    Y'can't shoot every single critter than can wander out of the woods when you're bait'in 'em. Waste of good ammo f'er openers.

    But then, we Yankees are cheap.

    Oh, and none of those horses ever got EPM.



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