The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 48 of 48
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2000
    Posts
    8,974

    Default

    Please be sure to include a pool, hot tub, and a Keurig coffee maker... of course for the humans!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,492

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wcporter View Post


    Wow.
    Quote Originally Posted by vxf111 View Post
    Yeah really. I think I need to revise my lottery plan. Thanks for sharing, that's gaga gorgeous!
    I know; right?! It's a stunning farm.

    One of the things I find interesting about it is that it's really all about the horses. I mean, the house is lovely and the finishes are beautiful, but most of the time when you see a property at that price point, there is an actual kitchen (as in, a separate room, not just some high end appliances along one wall of the living room) and more than 2 bedrooms. You can tell it was really built for people whose focus was on the barn/horses!!!
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2000
    Location
    Chatham, NY USA
    Posts
    4,100

    Default

    Haven't read all - but...if it hasn't been mentioned already - paddocks with alleyways between (ideally, wide enough to drive tractor/spreader or truck between, but specifically wide enough to keep neighbors from eating each other or each other's clothes).

    Definitely like the just above - hay (and shavings) storage in separate barn/ enclosed area.
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2012
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    300

    Default

    One of the greatest things I saw at barns I've been, separate doors in stall that swing out with feed bins and hay rack attached. This way you can put feed in bin and hay in rack without having to go in to aggressive horses stalls. indoor wash rack with hot and cold water. Wide enough aisle-ways so that trunks could be placed next to stalls for storage such as blankets, slinkies, fleece liners, etc. This way blankets and sheets can be stored year round for owner convenience. Lighting would be very important. Also plenty of sockets, high enough that kids could not reach, but low enough for vertically challenged people like me and low enough that clipper cords could reach horses feet. A nice tack room for boarders that is climate controlled, with couches, a fridge (for boarders drinks), a bathroom with shower. Decent sized lockers for peoples supplies. Individual bridle and halter racks on stalls. I would also agree with paddocks being close enough that it does not take 1 hr to turn in/out small amount of horses. Multiple medium sized paddocks for small herds 2-3 horses, plus some for individual turnout. I would also say keep several of the acres for growing your own hay.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,894

    Default

    People often forget arena location. I ride at two places that have the rings all situated where cars go by. When you are working a green horse it's distracting. To add to all the wonderful suggestions separate things so they wont be distracting such as feed deliveries not near the rings etc. Also neighbors; it sounds like you have a very large property and don't have to worry about others - where I am non horse neighbors are also a pain.

    Have fun!!!
    Don't saw on your horses mouth it's not a piece of wood! ~ GM



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,123

    Default

    A couple of silly things...

    A big work sink in the feed room. Good for making mashes or for horses who needed to be soaked meals. Also just nice for washing up buckets.

    A sensible spot for tack cleaning, either near the grooming area or in the tack room(s), with access to hot and cold water.

    If you store hay above (my preference, though I realize the issues that come with it), include drops for the hay to the stalls below. This saves a tremendous amount of time on cleaning up hay messes.

    An easily sweepable, blowable, cleanable no slip surface in the barn aisle. Please, no rubber pavers, which are no slip but absolute BEASTS to keep clean. Brushed concrete or flat rubber mats.



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2010
    Posts
    296

    Default

    Fantastic suggestions so far! One thing I would add is to carefully consider local weather patterns when finalizing placement of structures, arenas, etc. You don't want a barn positioned so that rain is constantly blowing in the doors/windows or that will become a wind tunnel when the barn is open. Also consider the total layout (buildings, field fencelines, xc course) when working out plumbing and electrical. You don't want to have to deal with issues with one of those if you end up renovating later, or a major disruption to the farm if one needs to be serviced.



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Northeast Ohio, where mud rules your world...
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    Outlets outlets outlets. Inside, outside, in the arena, in the bathroom, in the tack room. everywhere!!!

    A floor drain in your bathroom and in your tack room. Imagine if the toilet overflows.

    manure management. Have a place that s*** can go in the worst possible weather. a manure pit, a concrete catch basin, anywhere. But be prepared for that stuff to pile up and be under foot if you don't plan a good handling layout.

    A sound system. We love our radio and speakers so we can rock out or hook our mic to it and teach without yelling.

    Chew proof everything. Your stall walls, your arena walls, your fencing. Makes things last longer and stay nice looking. Less costly to chew proof than replace.

    a dedicated tractor and drag for footing. Most barns don't drag enough because of the inconvenience of hooking and unhooking a drag.

    If you are living on property, make it a clear boundary between your family space and the farm space so clients know when to stop. Gives your husband a place to walk around in his undies without scaring the ladies.

    Good drainage is critical and hard to do over. Good ventilation and fans make Florida summers livable.

    Driveway beepers or some sort of notification system for when people come and go.
    ...don't sh** where you eat...


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Update Post 21. Barn A, Barn B, Barn C. Which Would You Choose?
    By The Alternate in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: Dec. 5, 2012, 12:55 AM
  2. Perfect Your Jumping Without Ever Going to the Barn
    By Mike Matson in forum Off Course
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Oct. 19, 2011, 08:15 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Aug. 14, 2010, 08:03 PM
  4. Barn Manners: You’re Rude, I’m Perfect
    By elizuhowell in forum Off Course
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jan. 27, 2010, 03:01 PM
  5. Perfect Barn Dog Little Rat Terrier Male Georgia
    By msrobin in forum Giveaways
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Jan. 25, 2009, 12:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness