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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2009
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    Mission,B.C
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    721

    Default question for working students and BO's

    I am wanting to apply for a working student program to a local stable.i was thinking ,as it is applying for a job.i thought it would be helpful and professional to bring along a resume and coverletter to show my goals and equestrian credentials,achievements, etc.

    working students:,did you have a resume with you at time of applying for a working student program?

    barn owners/instructors: would you find it not only helpful,but more likely to hire/work with someone as a working student if they had a resume/coverletter with them at time of applying?



    any insight in this topic would be helpful.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2003
    Location
    Canada where all hell has broke free
    Posts
    2,409

    Default

    I asked all my WS for an resume. If I didn't get one from someone then they came off the list. To me it shows how much the person truly wants the position.
    My life motto now is "You can't fix stupid!"

    Are you going to cowboy up, or lie there and bleed


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2008
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Please, don't take this the wrong way, but if you decide to make a resume/cover letter be sure to have someone check it for typos.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    I always have an updated resume, even if it's just for a job at McDonald's. It makes you look organized and professional. I agree with having a second person review it for typos.

    Maybe I'm crazy, but I always try to put my best foot forward when chasing a job with the horses, since I know how competitive they might be. If the position is a riding one, I also have a DVD that I try to keep updated to my highest ability level. It's easy to walk up to a BO and say that you've jumped four feet and done PSG dressage, but (IMO) it seems much more trust worthy if you can back that up with proof. People flub about their ability level all the time to get a job, and with horses that can really get you into some hot water.

    Good luck!
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,267

    Default

    I always submit a resume, more horsey geared, when applying for WS jobs or even stable hand jobs. I have a website about my riding where pictures are avaliable, and I submit references! Don't forget your references because those are most important usually.
    The Struggle - - a blog about the equestrian struggle.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Location
    Snohomish, WA
    Posts
    506

    Default

    I have only had one WS position where I didn't turn in a resume. I got this job through a friend and was hired on the spot. Guess I got a good reference!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    4,906

    Default

    Yes, submit a resume and cover letter. And if your posting and blogging style reflects how you always write with regard to capitalization and punctuation, make sure someone edits it for you.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    519

    Default

    ^Nicely stated, furlong47



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2011
    Location
    Texas
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    Default

    Also, though I mainly highlight my riding and horsey attributes, I am sure to mention that I can do other non-horsey things. Like, being a personal assistant, running shows and hunter paces, nanny (you wouldn't believe how many jobs that has gotten me!!), leadership awards, etc.. I think those are JUST as important because sometimes you may need to schedule appointments, be a camp counselor, and make bulk orders.
    The Struggle - - a blog about the equestrian struggle.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2011
    Posts
    620

    Default

    Be sure to emphasize your riding first, but any other skills you have as a close second (some examples are knowledge of bookkeeping/accounting, experience with children/babysitting/being a nanny, extraordinary "people skills", which are always important, experience negotiating contracts which could be handy negotiating sponsorships, things like this). As a working student, you will be riding, but you will also get a taste of everything. Wherever there's a personnel hole at the barn, you will need to fill in-- no matter where this hole happens to be. I found that the longer I worked, the less I actually rode: as I gained experience, I was asked to do more "logistical" stuff on the ground, and ended up more on the management side of things (which is actually a good place for me, I am not all that confident getting on horses I don't know and going. I can keep a bunch of horses' grain, meds, workouts, tack, and blankets straight however. And I can untangle and roll a dryer full of polos in a flash.).

    So be sure to emphasize these skills, also. In the end, I think this is what separates people who can use the working student position to step into an assistant trainer position and go from there and those who can ride but haven't developed the all the skills needed to make the next step. Show your potential employer that you are not a dead end, that you have the potential to grow.



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