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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    11,331

    Default Behavioral house training lapses....

    Two dogs. The eldest has had some medical issues that have left him less able to control his bowels over the last few months resulting in frequent accidents in the house. I have cleaned the carpet thoroughly and stayed very much on top of it.

    Problem? Other dog seems to think that it's now a free for all to pee and poop in the house rather than asking to go out. He's 2 1/2, smart, likes to stay in the middle of the excitement.

    I kid you not, two days ago, I had company over with her dog and rather than give me a clue that he needed to go out, he just peed in the living room. It's as if he doesn't want to miss out on the fun so just took a short cut.

    I was stunned.

    But he's been doing this sort of thing ever since the other dog got sick.

    I'm not really sure what to do with him! He will pee AND poop on the kids' beds as well. It's like it's just too much trouble for him to go downstairs and ask to go out.

    I take them out regularly throughout the day. He has no health issues. I think this is purely a "well, he did it, why can't I?" kind of thing.

    I still don't have the other dog 100% under control. I'm not going to get nasty about it. But I WOULD like to stop it.

    Thoughts?

    I am not doing pee pads in the house btw. I am home all freaking day, I walk them, there is no shortage of potty opportunities.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    16,624

    Default

    Sounds like time to start housetraining all over again. Crate him or tether him to you until he gets it.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,418

    Default

    Although ive raised a number of dogs in my lifetime, im no pro when it comes to dogs for sure.

    so, im just gonna take a stab-in-the-dark here. this is just what I would do

    Perhaps take him back to kindergarten.... back in the crate, and potty training all over again. you have to be lead mare in this situation, by insisting he goes potty in the designated area (not up for discussion/debate).

    Poodles are VERY smart, he will pick it up again in no time



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2011
    Location
    East Longmeadow, MA
    Posts
    3,139

    Default

    Oh man. No suggestions for you, BuddyRoo, I am a cat person. But wow. What a PITA.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    16,172

    Default

    I agree--back to the beginning.

    But I also wonder if there is some sort of anxiety issue at play as well. Perhaps one of those DAP diffusers would be useful? Or clomipramine?

    I know that if one of my dogs was regularly going inside the house, the other would *really* be stressed from that



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,331

    Default

    I can't find our danged crates. They're still in a box SOMEwhere. (i hope!) Haven't been able to find them since the move.

    Most of the messes seem to occur either A) at night or B) while we are literally within FEET of him. I could tether the pup but he sticks by me 99.9% of the time. He's within inches of me right now. He likes to stick close. When he peed Wednesday, it was just straight from my lap to the stairs, peed, then back to me. WTH?????

    Maybe he IS stressed Simke, but I think he's just taking shortcuts. I am so tired of cleaning carpet. Gah.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
    Posts
    1,163

    Default

    My little guy is 1 1/2 years old and he was pretty good initially. Crate trained at 7 months when I got him but not housebroken. He picked it up pretty quickly, I too am at home most of the time (I work at home 4 days a week).

    A few weeks ago he started pooping in the hall in the mornings. Just here and there ... but then last week he did it 3 days in a row. And I'm up by 6, and it's still steaming when I find it. I think he does it when I'm in the bathroom brushing my teeth.

    So ... back in the crate he has gone at night. He was not happy about it at first (he's been out of the crate for months). It's been a week, he's been waiting for me to wake up and take him out, and he hasn't gone in the crate.

    I'll give this another few days and then leave him out at night and see where we are.

    So as other have said, give him a refresher course - it shouldn't take long for him to 'remember'.

    I should add that when I'm at work my one day in the office, I put a gate up so he can't go upstairs and poop when I'm away. He only seems to want to go in that one area of the upstairs hall. He has the whole downstairs with my other dog. He is really good about not going while I'm gone from the house.

    If your guy goes in the same areas, then block those off until he 'proves' himself again. May help in discouraging the behavior as well.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2010
    Posts
    995

    Default

    how about one of those belly bands used to keep male dogs from marking?.....



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    Oh man. I'm here is cleaning the carpet every two freakin' hours land too. *waves* We have wine here, which helps.

    I agree with those that say back to Pre-K. Offering potty every half hour or so. It's a total pain in the neck. You know the drill, I'm sure.

    I agree that tethering would be a good idea, since he goes away when he has to potty and goes upstairs. If he can't get away, maybe he'll smarten up about how outside is a lovely potty place. Also. Make sure the doors to his favorite places to go are closed. Baby gates maybe, until the problem is solved?

    Gah. I know how you feel. It's frustrating when they go in the house.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,592

    Default

    One day I was walking my sheltie around the neighborhood. We had been outside all afternoon so I didn't think to grab a poop bag. Of course he hunkers down to poop and I sort of moan the word nooooo quietly because I didn't have a bag. I didn't yell at him or punish him in anyway. For the next week he pooped ONLY in the house! I guess he figured it was now a bad thing to poop outside so going inside was his only recourse! Some of them are too smart for their own good, my Pom wouldn't come to that conclusion if I had rained punishment directly upon her! We did start over again with the housebreaking once we figured out what had happened and he got it figured out quickly.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
    Location
    the Armpit of the Nation
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    3,160

    Default

    BuddyRoo, I think you are correct, barring any medical issues-the young dog is confused by all of the scent in the house. Poor you - what a time you've had!

    The only thing to do is to put as much time as possible between the last time he soiled in the house and the next time. This is my philosophy when encountering most dog behavioral problems like soiling, budding aggression, even a slow recall. In other words, don't allow the problem behavior to occur again for enough time to allow the undesirable behavior to fade, then gradually allow freedom but with a close eye on the dog, alert for any signs indicating a possible lapse.

    In your case, I'd dig out a crate today and reintroduce strict puppy housebreaking - sleeping in crate, outside in AM with a cue phrase for elimination (I use "Hurry up")- if he doesn't P AND P, back into the crate to be fed. 15-20 minutes later, out again. Freedom in house ONLY when both Ps are done outside. Outside immediately after eating, playing, sleeping, EVERY TIME YOU COME HOME, any excitement such as your friend and her dog coming over. Pretty much every hour or 2 after breakfast potty trip is accomplished.

    Cue phrases for elimination really come in handy for the quick potty trips. Be RIGID in your feeding schedule and anticipate any possible opportunities for lapses, like a big exercise session and lots of H2O drinking. Trot him back outside immediately, or place in crate, or watch like a HAWK for any movement once he settles down for a nap after the exercise. You may need months of this. Reconcile yourself to this fact and work to build an ever longer span of time between the last oopsie and the next-if you follow your schedule and crate him when you think there is the slightest possibility of an accident and give him numerous opportunities for bathroom breaks during the day, you should have success.

    I realize that you probably know all of this! Most of us do, but as a professional dog trainer of 30 yrs. who has up to 12 dogs in her house at any given time, this simple philosophy of quickly identifying the beginnings of an undesirable behavior and a pattern forming and taking steps to prevent that pattern from becoming habitual has really worked and it has kept me sane You must give the dog every chance of success by maintaining the routine for as long as it takes. In this case, when you see a clear elimination pattern developing, you can begin giving your dog a bit more freedom.

    I think I read that you are in a rental with white wall-to-wall carpet? That certainly makes the job of cleaning thoroughly a problem. You may have to maintain some restrictions with this dog until that carpet is removed or you move out.

    Good luck!
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    948

    Default

    Agree with everybody, be sure you use an enzymatic cleaner designed for pet odors and start from scratch with the housetraining. Remember that in addition to the older dog's accidents, you just moved, right?, so that's another stressor or environmental factor that might be contributing to the issue.
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
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    6,901

    Default

    have you had him checked for a UTI?

    and it's possible your house now smells like a potty area, so he thinks it's ok. You might need to replace the carpet.

    dogs who potty on peoples beds are usually doing so out of stress/ a change in routine.

    He is probably very stressed- reacting to your own stress about the potty situation, reacting to other dog's pooping, and you probably haven't paid much attention to him lately what with the other problems.

    Did you just move, too? Often dogs don't generalize well, and have to be quickly re-housebroken in each new house they live in. Plus of course moving= stress.

    So:
    1) check for UTI
    2) remove potty smells
    3) rehousebreak dog as if dog were a young pup
    4) attempt to address the stress- thundershirts work well on some dogs, and are easy enough to get and try out.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,331

    Default

    I have an appt tomorrow for dog A to be tested for Addison's, dog B to be tested again for UTI and fecal--but I'm pretty sure it's just a matter of convenience and the fact that he hates how wet it is outside. It's done nothing but rain and be yucky in the last week.

    My plan right now is:

    1) Crate is back up. found it. Assembled it. I'm putting it in one of the kids' rooms where he seems cool about pooping and peeing in hopes that he'll find that room to be his "home" and will knock it off.

    2) He is getting to be chained to me. All day. When not chained to me, he's in a crate.

    3) I am employing the "go pee" command and lots of praise. He's not food driven AT ALL so that is harder. But we're going to work on it.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



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