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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    753

    Default Possibly buying farm property....demolition question

    We found a cute couple of acres that unfortunately has a house (right in the middle of the property) that is uninhabitable. The little barn is suitable though!! Haven't made an offer yet or anything, just trying to get some numbers in my head. FWIW we have placed a call to a local company that specializes in demo, waiting to hear back from them with their estimate.

    The house is only about 1900 square ft. It is brick veneer but I think it is built from a cinder block outer shell...don't think it's stick built, so that might make the job harder

    Just wondering if anyone knows an approximate cost of demolition and haul away for this sort of structure (Raleigh, NC area) We would build a new home on the side of the property and use the former house space and front yard as more pasture.

    My husband thinks that with the right equipment and some additional manpower he could take care of the demo part. So perhaps that would save some money??



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    I have no first hand experience with this. But one thought I had while reading your last bit about DIY is that depending on the age of the structure you may have some safety issues to contend with regarding lead for example. I don't know what all of the permits and safety procedures ARE, but especially when you are considering using the space as pasture, I'd want to be sure that any contaminants were properly handled/removed to avoid future issues with the critters.

    You should be able to arrange to have someone come out and do an estimate for you before you buy. Good luck!
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,177

    Default

    The termites ate our old horse training barn down, clear to the rafters.
    I pushed it in with the bulldozer without trouble, it was stick and stucco and had a dump truck and loader haul that off.
    That was the only cost and for a bit more, the loader could have pushed all down, so consider that.

    There was an option of digging a big hole and burying/burning stuff down, but with our termite problem, we didn't want to give them any more places to make themselves at home, as in such a buried pile.

    On another old grain barn, the fire department came and use it for a practice day and it was not much left.
    That won't work for concrete block, of course.

    Just some options for you to consider.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    11,793

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    But one thought I had while reading your last bit about DIY is that depending on the age of the structure you may have some safety issues to contend with regarding lead for example. I don't know what all of the permits and safety procedures ARE, but especially when you are considering using the space as pasture, I'd want to be sure that any contaminants were properly handled/removed to avoid future issues with the critters.
    Yes, good thing to remember.
    Add asbestos to the list of things to keep in mind, depending on when the house was built.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    753

    Default

    Great idea Bluey I will investigate the fire dept. practice burn option!

    Trubandloki, it was built in 1970 ...probably not a good era for avoiding asbestos



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,206

    Default

    Just a heads up coming from experiences in over regulated parts of the country, you may not want to demolish it, having it there may grandfather you in to repair your septic rather than build new at astounding prices, having it at all may give you greater leeway for many things

    Please check regarding the suitability to build of your place first.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,827

    Default

    Yes, be sure to check with city/county etc on the demolition. You should also check setbacks to fence lines...you may not be able to put the new house as far to the side as you think. And definitely talk to the demo pros.
    Julie
    www.centaurfencing.com
    Safer, Stronger, Lasts Longer!
    Godspeed BARBARO--Run fast and free!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,334

    Default

    Dumpsters are expensive and they get more expensive every day.

    There's probably a reason the house was built where it was. You'd want to assess what that is - elevation, drainage, suitability for septic, access to power lines, access to the well, etc. They may have been wrong but don't assume so without giving it some thought.

    Whether they were right or wrong, moving all that infrastructure may trigger some higher permitting/regulatory barriers and it may cost more than you might guess.

    The last thing to consider is that if the house is uninhabitable, you may have a lot of difficulty getting a loan for the property. Friend of mine was having trouble closing even on fixer-uppers.

    Oh, and don't underestimate the time, money, and trauma involved in building a house. It's a serious part-time job for the homeowner even if you have a GC, just because of all the decisions you have to make.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,226

    Default

    Also, if you demo the house are there other items that must go also? I'm talking about buried fuel tanks, septic, and how do they permit and assess taxes on new builds where the house is? What kind of house do you want to build there? And I second the problems you might face with rebuilding because of zoning, setbacks, drainage, road access, etc.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    I am a builder by trade as well as a horse lover. I have done many, many remodels where I have worked with the existing to "save" money. 99 times out of 10 I would argue to tear down, demolish and restart...new construction goes 100 times smoother than trying to work around something pre-existing as far as the carpentry framing, etc. An entirely new house will have significant resale value.
    I cannot see North Carolina overregulating you the way California does, but obviously get real friendly with the town CEO and Planning Board so the petty bureaucrats don't run your project into the ground. But relocation means that you will need to look carefully at costs for new septic, water, utilities to the new location...how much for another electrical pole, additonal driveway, etc. If you can take re-utilize of any of those pre-existing items without great expense, you will save a lot. For example you can plan on spending $6-10k for a well, $10 k for a new septic and leach field...nice to tap into form the old house if possible.

    An excavator and a dumptruck should make very short work of a house like that(couple of days) for demolition.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    753

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rabtfarm View Post
    I am a builder by trade as well as a horse lover. I have done many, many remodels where I have worked with the existing to "save" money. 99 times out of 10 I would argue to tear down, demolish and restart...new construction goes 100 times smoother than trying to work around something pre-existing as far as the carpentry framing, etc. An entirely new house will have significant resale value.
    I cannot see North Carolina overregulating you the way California does, but obviously get real friendly with the town CEO and Planning Board so the petty bureaucrats don't run your project into the ground. But relocation means that you will need to look carefully at costs for new septic, water, utilities to the new location...how much for another electrical pole, additonal driveway, etc. If you can take re-utilize of any of those pre-existing items without great expense, you will save a lot. For example you can plan on spending $6-10k for a well, $10 k for a new septic and leach field...nice to tap into form the old house if possible.

    An excavator and a dumptruck should make very short work of a house like that(couple of days) for demolition.
    It is city water and sewer



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fivesocks View Post
    It is city water and sewer
    Then your only concern would be hooking in, no ledge or underground costly impediments to running new water and sewer to the new home location...probably not a big issue in your neck of the woods, but around here underground ledge can be a serious deal breaker...suddenly a 50 foot trench costs $750 per foot rather than half days work with a backhoe.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,782

    Default

    No ledge there. It's most likely just red clay underneath.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    14,334

    Default

    Despite my comments above, I agree that if the old house is a loss, that a brand new house is probably faster and cheaper to build. The cost of demolition per se on the old house is but a pittance compared to the whole project cost.

    However, think long and hard before you take this project on, that this really is within your finances, your time, and your stamina.

    Oh, and if there is going to be pasture there when you're done... how are you going to clear all the nails? You think I'm joking, but, noooo.....
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
    Posts
    410

    Default

    I've watched two neighbors demolish old houses by using a backhoe to dig a big hole, shove the house in, burn, and cover up the hole again.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,226

    Default

    In your place, before going forward, I would figure out exactly what you would want to build. Figure the approximate size, siding/brick/other materials, how big, and what you would want to include like hardwood floors, appliance quality, etc. Then figure out if you could afford, and want to live through the building process. And make sure you allow extra money for the inevitable 'might as well as' add ons, that everyone upgrades during the process. You can save by getting things like flooring, lighting, etc on sale, or things like kitchen cabinets that are stock type (IKEA, or semi custom for example) instead of totally custom. Then price it out, and decide if that is what you want to do.

    The big problem on the demo of the current house is disposal of possible hazardous materials, but it might turn out to be your one chance to get exactly what you want in a house.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,320

    Default

    Is it possible to gut it and put two garage type end doors on it and find a use like hay storage, tractor storage, barn, run in, or indoor round pen for it? Might be pretty easy to do, and since it has running water, might make a good option for a few stalls or something useful.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    753

    Default

    Jetsmom, I like your thinking but the old house ceiling is very low, and the existing barn has ample space for storage.

    I really appreciate all the replies! We do know a builder so feel pretty good about that aspect.

    Dressagefancy, there just happens to be a worthless pit where an in ground pool once was...perhaps it could get filled in with house rubble?



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
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    8,226

    Default

    One hint about building is the second you finalize the plans and they start construction, you don't do any change orders. Change orders or changing configuration is a budget killer, and you need to plan once with more space than you want, and make sure you put in more storage than you think you'll ever use. If you shop around for things like end of season lighting (all matching looks wonderful and very elegant), and end of lot tile you'll save a bundle. You probably need a nice storage area for things like spare tile, extra flooring, and other things you need spares of for replacements later. And if you do hardwoods, then have them rip strips of the wood, and use that instead of threshholds. I hate the store bought threshholds, because they never match exactly, stick up higher than the floor, and costs more than the floor does, so I think it's a great finish for hardwoods-a friend did that and it looks wonderful.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
    Posts
    1,087

    Default

    Assuming you don’t have to bring in a licensed Hazmat crew which is insanely expensive. I doubt there is anything to be overly concerned about. I am an old hippy and grew up with the environmental movement. But IMO a lot of things have been blown completely out of proportion to the possible health risks and environmental impact. But it seems we live in a nanny nation these days and nannies are expensive. The cost all depends on how you go about it. If it has to be hauled away and it is made of cinderblock with brick veneer this could be pretty costly. Around here it costs $61 a ton when taken to a land fill. A contractor may get a better price. Truckers charge by the mile so that comes down to how far you have to haul it. Dumpsters may be more cost effective. The equipment owner/operator is going to get depending on the size of the equipment needed a couple hundred dollars an hours? Area specific. Your husband should be able to rent what is needed and have a lot fun. But truckers don’t really like working with amateurs. A pro can fill a truck pretty quick. But if you go with dumpsters then you can take all the time you want. Burning it as another has suggested will cut down on the volume and weight. Fire departments usually love to get practice burns. But you run the risk of opening yourself up to the bureaucratic process. As another suggested burn and bury if possible. But this has to been be done with thought and understanding of the process. If not you may end up with a “sink hole” a few years down the road as things settle. You would be surprised of the volume and weight you will end up with even with a small structure.



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