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  1. #1
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    Default Hock injections, best way to bring horse back to work and success stories?

    Hi all, we injected our pony's hocks last Tuesday and she will be off until Monday mostly because we're focused on another pony we're showing this weekend. Is there any recommendation of the best way to bring them back to work? I assume light hacks for a few days etc. Also, very curious to hear what effects people have had.



  2. #2
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    This may be a little off as it has been ages, but dont you need to ice 3-4 times a day and hand walk for 2 days the. Back under the saddle light hack and back fulltime in 6 days??? It's been ages but I dont recall almost a full week "off". What did the vet say?



  3. #3
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    he said she needed stall rest for a day, we left her in two days with some hand walking. And he said we could hack her starting Saturday, but we're giving her the weekend off because we'll be at a show. I'm just not sure how to bring her back when we start on Monday.



  4. #4
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    4-5 days off, a lighter week, then back to full work.


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  5. #5
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    I did two days stall rest with really light hand walking. Two days turn out in a smaller paddock, hand walking. One day regular turn out, light walk and trot down the long ends for 20 minutes. Light hack walk trot a little canter, then a real hack, then jumping under 2'3", then day off, then jumping under 3', back to regular work.
    .אני יכול לעשות הכל על ידי אלוהים



  6. #6
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    They come back pretty easy from hock injections. IMHO. I always have a couple of days of stall rest with just hand grazing. Then back out as normal.

    In terms of riding, post-stall rest I do a couple of days of light hacking, a couple of days of real flatwork and then back to life as normal.

    I have never known anyone to ice-post injections unless something else is going on aside from routine hock injections as maintenance. Maybe if you're injection a joint that's been injured? But not for maintenance.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  7. #7
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    thanks guys!



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by vxf111 View Post

    I have never known anyone to ice-post injections unless something else is going on aside from routine hock injections as maintenance. Maybe if you're injection a joint that's been injured? But not for maintenance.
    Brain fart, not ice, cold hose - the funny thing is one vet always said cold hose, one of the top vets on the east coast, but another more back yard type (but as good) gave instructions to a barn mate and didn't request cold hosing. So who knows!!



  9. #9
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    The follow up protocol for hock injections varies widely. I have always been told (by a couple of different practices) to stall the night post injections, turn out but no riding the next day, then an easy hack the next, and usually back to work within a day or two after that. No cold hosing, no stall rest, no bute. Just a couple of easy days and go. This is actually been the general protocol for just about every joint I've had injected, with the exception of very painful SIs.

    I would treat the pony like any other horse who had a week off for one reason or another- a couple of easy days to get it loosened back up and get it back in the game, then return to normal routine.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    The follow up protocol for hock injections varies widely. I have always been told (by a couple of different practices) to stall the night post injections, turn out but no riding the next day, then an easy hack the next, and usually back to work within a day or two after that. No cold hosing, no stall rest, no bute. Just a couple of easy days and go. This is actually been the general protocol for just about every joint I've had injected, with the exception of very painful SIs.

    I would treat the pony like any other horse who had a week off for one reason or another- a couple of easy days to get it loosened back up and get it back in the game, then return to normal routine.
    Ditto. We've done hock injections on many horses over the years, and this has always been our (successful) protocol.
    Cherry Blossom Farm - Show & Field Hunters, Side Saddles


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SidesaddleRider View Post
    Ditto. We've done hock injections on many horses over the years, and this has always been our (successful) protocol.
    shouldve just asked you SSR



  12. #12
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    Yellowbritches' experience has been the same as mine, regardless of the joint injected.

    As a human who receives joint injections (remarkably, the same "stuff" as the horses get!), that is essentially the same protocol for humans, too. Ibuprofen/Tylenol for the pain, one day of "stall rest" (avoid using the joint but not immobile), then a slow return to regular activity, maybe one or two days of light activity. My horses have all responded very well to this schedule, too.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  13. #13
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    add me to that protocol, but if you have the time it will never cause a problem to go slower so either way you can't go wrong, right?

    The only thing I can add about the human depo-medrol injection is the tendon versions cause a word of hurt for about 48-60 hours (the injection itself isn't that uncomfortable, it's about 2 hours later). I had 3 tendon sheath injections last year and the elbow version was ... special. However at the end of that 48 hours it was like somebody flipped the pain dial from 9.9 to 0 in a second.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    The follow up protocol for hock injections varies widely. I have always been told (by a couple of different practices) to stall the night post injections, turn out but no riding the next day, then an easy hack the next, and usually back to work within a day or two after that. No cold hosing, no stall rest, no bute. Just a couple of easy days and go. This is actually been the general protocol for just about every joint I've had injected, with the exception of very painful SIs.

    I would treat the pony like any other horse who had a week off for one reason or another- a couple of easy days to get it loosened back up and get it back in the game, then return to normal routine.
    THIS.. more or less



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by myalter1 View Post
    THIS.. more or less
    Same here, although the vet has had me give Banamine (he was ulcer-prone, so no Bute) to the horses that were not very stoic and easily upset just in case they were sore.



  16. #16
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    I've always been told stall rest first day, 3 days off, then back to full work.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcella View Post
    Same here, although the vet has had me give Banamine (he was ulcer-prone, so no Bute) to the horses that were not very stoic and easily upset just in case they were sore.
    FYI, Bute and Banamine have the same effect on the stomach lining and can both complicate ulcers. If you want to reduce the chance of gastro-intestinal injury from the use of anti-inflamatories you have to give a selective COX 2 inhibitor like Equioxx.

    I always give the horses a pain-killer of some sort after an injection. I've had my back injected and I was pretty sore from the actual injection itself for about a day until it took effect.
    ******
    "A good horse and a good rider are only so in mutual trust."
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  18. #18
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    Yes, I forgot that I do bute for the 2 days of stall rest. Most vets say the action of going in with the needle is pretty uncomfortable and the site can hurt a bit for a few days. Apparently navicular bursa injections are HUGELY painful and hocks less so, but still painful. I guess it depends on the animal. Somerset does object a bit to the needle going in. Stoney would stand to have it done without sedation if you wanted to (and he's generally a bit of a baby).
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  19. #19
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    We've always been told that the important part is to keep the injection sites clean for 12-24 hours. Therefore, stall rest in a very clean stall, overnight is good; no turnout in rain or mud for 24 hours.



  20. #20
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    I can totally see why navicular bursas would be painful! As well as SIs. That is a big freaking needle and they have to put a little weight behind it to get it in (side note: I am pretty tough about most vet procedures. I've been bled ALL OVER, dealt with a horse refluxing buckets of stomach contents out his nose, watched a few surgeries, etc, etc, etc....I CAN NOT watch SI injections!).

    I know I have given horses bute at times after injections (especially SIs), or the vet has done it right then and there, but I've never had it be standard.



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