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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    3,771

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    You do know that 50+ gals riding are 'where it's at', don't you??

    We have lots of years left! Returning to riding 2 years ago has me in much better shape physically and mentally than many of those years beforehand.

    58, and working with my green OTTB who retired a couple of years ago.

    But my idol was my sister's neighbor, who at 90 was still riding her 16.2 Thoroughbred on trail rides. That's who I want to be when I grow up.
    That or Mrs. Genter. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDa0m-9lVY4
    Being right half the time beats being half-right all the time. Malcolm Forbes


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2003
    Location
    Nonsuch House
    Posts
    3,491

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    Okay, I can't read all the posts, but I am here to say I started doing recognized eventing in 2011 and rode the mare from H@ll. We qualified for the National championships and Regionals. I'll be 58 in a few weeks and looking forward to our now broodmare delivering our first "bred for sport" Thoroughbred. I am currently riding a mare I got off the track last Christmas and I hope to see this mare go up through the ranks of eventing as well as see the baby do upper level eventing. If all goes well, I'll be 65 or more when the baby reaches something serious and I plan on breeding again if all goes well in April.

    I have no intention of letting my age hold me back although I won't ride my broodmare again and I am smarter about the possibility of getting hurt and my limitations. A woman I ride with did not start riding at all until she was 50 and she now does BN eventing! So all in all I would say stay smart and find the right horse and don't ever think you're too old especially at your age.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    1,399

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    I was in a similar situation with a horse that was not a good match for me.

    At the age of 61, recovering from heart surgery and stroke, I bought another horse that was perfectly suited to me!! I'll be 66 in May and having a ball with him. I care for them (3 horses) at my daughter's farm. My 71 y/o husband and I do most of the cleaning and repairs. And I ride as often as I can, several times a week. Planning a fun show season on the Morgan Western Pleasure circuit this year!

    Go for it!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,630

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    It's great to see all the stories here, and I hope that they encourage the OP to find the right horse and keep riding. I've always noticed that many of the COTH forum members are "women of a certain age". And my recent issue of Practical Horseman indicated that the percentage of their subscribers in that category has increased, and represents the majority of their readers. I think that the horse industry in general will do well to keep that in mind for marketing of all sorts. Riding is an expensive hobby, both in terms of money and time, and many of us can't devote ourselves to riding until later in life. I keep asking my instructor to add and market a "crossrails & cocktails" class for that market (BYOB, of course), as son many of us are in it for the fun!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    776

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    I'm turning 40 this summer and am so happy to read this thread, for a couple of reasons. Due to having 2 busy kids at home, my riding time is somewhat limited. I have co-workers whose kids have gone off to college and they say how hard it is. Ppppshssh! Get a hobby! I might finally have time to ride a little more, and not feel guilty when I do. Yes, I'll miss the kids, but then I will go ride my horse. (OP, you could lease, but I bet you will fall in love with something and end up buying anyway.)

    And lately I have really wondered if my horse doesn't need a better rider. I plan on sticking with him, at least for awhile yet, but this thread made me realize I have time to tough it out with him if I want (he is 17) and still find my next perfect horse when I am older. I think most of us understand OP's difficulty rehoming her current horse. We can bond with them even if they aren't quite right for us. However, we sometimes need to realize that the horse doesn't feel that way about us and can be better off with someone else.

    I prefer the shorter horses/ponies as well. Grooming a tall horse is much more tiring...all that reaching up takes its toll. Mounting is tough also, especially in winter when the clothes are bulkier. I don't mind tall once I am on, it's the process of getting there that makes me like a shorty.

    Good luck, OP.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,184

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    LOL, I turn 50 later this year. I just came in from having the farrier here and it was the weanlings' first trim. Talk about a rodeo but so thankful they're Welsh (and it really wasn't that bad). I switched from holsteiners to Welsh when I started having kids. My kids are 17 and 20 now. Believe me shorter is easier and fortunately I'm of pony jock size so I can continue on my riding journey - competitive trail, dressage, you name it. As you can guess, with weanlings I hope to continue my riding and raising horses for at least a few more years to come. My parents who are in the mid 70s help with noon chores and are happy to be able to do so to keep active and involved. As one cautionary note, you still have to find the right partner even if it's shorter in stature. The good side to that is that there are lots of them around and available, especially if they are not of the size or perfect style to please the hunter machine.
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
    Posts
    2,187

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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudy18 View Post
    I don't mind tall once I am on, it's the process of getting there that makes me like a shorty.
    I don't mind tall when I'm on, it's the long trip to the ground I'm getting tired of!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    5,708

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    Quote Originally Posted by yaya View Post
    I don't mind tall when I'm on, it's the long trip to the ground I'm getting tired of!
    Yes, especially on cold days. Happily my 'too tall' fellow will glide right up next to the mounting block (or a rock, or whatever) for the dismount.



  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    360

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    Another over 50 here, 54 to be exact! I ride 6-7 days every week and am more fit now than when I was in my 30's. Just bought another greenie last week, 16.2h chestnut mare with lots of chrome that will hopefully be my next fancy hunter! She's a bit of a handful under saddle but oh so fun to ride! I also have my 10yo TB who I can tool around the farm on so I have the best of both worlds. I am healthy, happy and plan on riding until I can't hold the reins any longer.
    Last edited by carasmom; Jan. 12, 2013 at 03:40 PM. Reason: spelling


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2009
    Location
    Dawsonville, GA
    Posts
    9

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    saddleup--I think you stated the most important thing--GET THE RIGHT HORSE. I am 54 and want to do a little bit of hunter showing. About 2 years ago I bought a lovely TB with lots of show mileage and thought he would be the one. It didn't work out at all. Because I'm not nearly as brave as I once was, this horse got my number and intimidated me. He started spooking and bolting across the ring for no reason. When I realized that I was making excuses NOT to ride, I knew I needed to sell him. That was the perfect decision for me. I now have a perfect gentleman of a horse. He is a draft cross so he is quite kind and sensible, but he was also fully trained to do what I want. I now look forward to riding and have a partner I adore. My confidence has soared because I have the right horse.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2004
    Posts
    239

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    Thank you all so much for your inspiring stories and wonderful support and encouragement! You have no idea how much you have helped me!

    I completely agree with the importance of finding the right horse. My first horse was that horse. Since I had leased him from the riding school for 9 months before I bought him, I knew him inside and out--we had been on trail rides and hunter paces together, and I knew all his strengths, weaknesses and quirks. He was in my life for 9 wonderful years until he had to be euthanized for melanomas that had become life-threatening and malignant.

    What makes it especially hard to sell my current girl is that she is really a great girl--no truly dangerous behaviors, she is sound as a dollar (where did that phrase come from), is sweet as can be, and is a gorgeous palomino to boot. Everyone at the barn loves her (including me). That said, for the reasons mentioned earlier, she is not easy for me to ride, and I truly have more fun riding the Welsh pony, on whom my riding has improved in leaps and bounds. And I know my girl has more fun going over jumps and gymnastics then doing the kinds of things I like. Plus, she is not a horse I (meaning me personally) would feel confident going on the trails alone--which I would like to do at some point. She needs a more confident ride than I can give her at this point in my life.

    It's so gratifying to here your stories of finally finding the right horse/pony after years of trying to make it work with the wrong one. This has been an agonizing few years for me, and the support truly helps!!!!!!



    .



  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2007
    Posts
    149

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    I have enjoyed reading all the posts in this thread. I was hoping to become (in my 50's) a rider again after many years off, but after several mismatches with horses I lost my confidence. Then health issues meant I couldn't lift the saddle, then get my leg OVER the saddle. I am 60 this year, and just bought another mini to keep mine company. I have given up.
    I still feel very sad about not riding. I enjoy reading about others my age riding, and age alone shouldn't keep you from getting the right horse.



  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,630

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    Is there any possibility that the owners of the barn where you ride would trade your horse for the Welsh pony you've been enjoying? You've already said that the young woman who does well on your horse can't afford to buy or even full lease her, but with a swap, perhaps she'd still have the chance for a half lease.



  14. #74
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2004
    Posts
    239

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    Southwestrerider...I am so sorry that you are not able to ride right now when you want to. I certainly understand how the wrong horse can eat away at your confidence. Several points in my riding career I have contemplated giving up riding because of it. I also understand how physical issues can interfere with riding. I've had to take several breaks over the past few years because of painful hip bursitis, sciatica, arthritis in the neck and shoulder...the list can go on! I can no longer mount from the ground and I sold ,y western saddle (which I used on trails) because I could no longer lift it on the horse. I also have osteopenia (precursor to osteoporosis), which makes me a tad more nervous about falling off! I' m glad you are enjoying your mini, and hope that you can swing a leg over a horse (or shorter pony) again. So glad you are keeping horses in your life!

    Hinderella....unfortunately the pony is currently too important to the school. He is a packer for little beginning kids but can also jump and step it up for more advanced riders. My horse can't fit that bill. And frankly, although she has been used in the school, ultimately I 'd love to find her her own person. I'm going to talk to my lease again and feel out her current situation. But thanks for the very good idea!!!!!



  15. #75
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2004
    Posts
    239

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    Southwestrerider...I am so sorry that you are not able to ride right now when you want to. I certainly understand how the wrong horse can eat away at your confidence. Several points in my riding career I have contemplated giving up riding because of it. I also understand how physical issues can interfere with riding. I've had to take several breaks over the past few years because of painful hip bursitis, sciatica, arthritis in the neck and shoulder...the list can go on! I can no longer mount from the ground and I sold ,y western saddle (which I used on trails) because I could no longer lift it on the horse. I also have osteopenia (precursor to osteoporosis), which makes me a tad more nervous about falling off! I' m glad you are enjoying your mini, and hope that you can swing a leg over a horse (or shorter pony) again. So glad you are keeping horses in your life!

    Hinderella....unfortunately the pony is currently too important to the school. He is a packer for little beginning kids but can also jump and step it up for more advanced riders. My horse can't fit that bill. And frankly, although she has been used in the school, ultimately I 'd love to find her her own person. I'm going to talk to my lease again and feel out her current situation. But thanks for the very good idea!!!!!



  16. #76
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2010
    Posts
    204

    Cool

    great thread / bump all year and more years to come hoof123


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