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  1. #1
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    Sep. 20, 2006
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    Default Best way to clip lunge line through bit ring and cavesson?

    I would like to try lunging with the line run through both the bit ring and noseband of the cavesson (to prevent pulling the bit during excessively joyful moments). My pony club manual has a diagram and says I should use a lunge line with a buckle on the end. Could I also use this method if my lunge line has a clip? If yes, does anyone have a photo or diagram that shows how it should be attached? The clip is not big enough to fit around both bit ring and cavesson so the line would have to be threaded through both and then clipped back to itself (or something). Thank you!



  2. #2
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    Mar. 18, 2012
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    109

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    i just slip the end of the lunge line through the ring of the bit, around the noseband, and back onto itself so that both the bit ring and noseband are inside the loop. this is with a normal bridle, not a lunge cavesson.



  3. #3
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    Sep. 20, 2006
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    Thanks, emeraldcity. That's what I thought but I wanted to see if others actually did it that way. I'll give it a try!



  4. #4
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    Jul. 30, 2005
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    I've never heard of doing it this way. What effect does it have? I'm having a hard time picturing it too. If anyone could post a pic that would be lovely.
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  5. #5
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    Oct. 21, 2009
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    I put the lunge line through the near bit ring, under the throat latch, over the poll, under the throat latch (on the far side), then clipped to the bit ring on the far side. You will obviously have to reverse this when you reverse directions, but in my experience, this will give you the most control and stability when lunging.


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  6. #6
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    Mar. 27, 2009
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    Upstate NY
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    I don't think I would want to do it like that. I want to be able to affect his bend and release the pressure, bring him into a smaller circle and allow him to straighten again. I loop through the bit and attach at the girth so that there is give in the action on the bit, otherwise you are only hanging onto the bit with a rein about 15 feet long. Not real useful for bending and asking the horse to use his back, but to each his own.
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  7. #7
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    Oct. 21, 2009
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    I've never had any issues with not being able to release pressure or not being able to control the bend. Here is a picture of how I use the lunge line (ignore the pessoa contraption thingy).

    http://www.doversaddlery.com/pessoa-...tem/p/X1-3026/

    I learned this method from European trainers and it seems to be much more prevalent over there. And besides the stability and control, I like that it helps keep the horses from leaning forward on the bit too.



  8. #8
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    The classically trained fellow who started one my horses used Kate's method.
    I found that when I rode her it felt as if she had been started by a person with a very strong hand and was not the only person to comment on that. Other than that he did a very careful, gentle job.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  9. #9
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Page 34 of Klimke's book which you can find at this link shows some ways of doing this. I use a variation of diagram a only with a regular cavesson (not a drop)and I run the snap end through the bit and cavesson itself then snap it back on itself- hard to explain -but similar effect as diagram a.

    http://books.google.ca/books?id=5yLP...page&q&f=false

    link goes to page 31 but you can flip over to 34


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
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    California
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    I've just started using a longing cavesson and have to say I like it so much better than any other bit/through-the-bit way of attaching the line. My horse is much softer and giving, and it is much easier to nip silliness in the bud!
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    Page 34 of Klimke's book which you can find at this link shows some ways of doing this. I use a variation of diagram a only with a regular cavesson (not a drop)and I run the snap end through the bit and cavesson itself then snap it back on itself- hard to explain -but similar effect as diagram a.

    http://books.google.ca/books?id=5yLP...page&q&f=false

    link goes to page 31 but you can flip over to 34
    the link didn't work for me, but I'm currently watching Klimkes cavaletti dvd and this is how they advise to do it as well, through the ring of the cavesson, through the bit ring, and then clip it back on itself. The narrator in the video says it has a stabilizing effect on the bit.
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  12. #12
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    Feb. 28, 2008
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    My apologies! I am confusing the book with the DVD. In the DVD they make a suggestion to use the lunge line clip and attach to a ring on the bridle and the bit ring. I took a photo

    http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c5...pseebb914e.jpg
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  13. #13
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    Sep. 24, 2008
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    I do the same as in the Klimke book, with the line through the bit and under the noseband then clipped back on itself. It takes a lot of the weight of the longe line off of the mouth and transfers it to the noseband/bridle.
    I've rarely seen anyone around here do it this way. Usually they use the over-the-poll method which I think can be harsh in the wrong...which is just about any...hands.

    NJR
    Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does.



  14. #14
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    Mar. 18, 2012
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    109

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    Quote Originally Posted by kookicat View Post
    I've never heard of doing it this way. What effect does it have? I'm having a hard time picturing it too. If anyone could post a pic that would be lovely.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...ps6e0ac60a.jpg

    i was taught this method for young/less schooled horses so that you're not pulling on their mouth while they're figuring things out. i use the over the poll method for more schooled horses.


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  15. #15
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    Oct. 29, 1999
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    Quote Originally Posted by emeraldcity View Post
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...ps6e0ac60a.jpg

    i was taught this method for young/less schooled horses so that you're not pulling on their mouth while they're figuring things out. i use the over the poll method for more schooled horses.
    I tried this just once and when the horse acted up, I broke the noseband.

    I sometimes go over the poll, but not under the throatlatch. What I like the best for controlling bend, and even bit effect, etc, is just thru the near bit ring, under the chin and clipped to the far ring. That evens the pressure, but needs to be used by a person with good hands, and a sensitive touch. The brakes are REALLY there when needed though. You can stop a freight train - especially useful for safety if you are someplace it would be especially dangerous for the horse to get loose.



  16. #16
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    MA
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    Depends on the horse. For a horse that has a natural tendency to raise his head and hollow his back, the poll pressure of the longe line going over his poll works well.

    For a horse that has a natural tendency to lower his head or curl his neck, the longe line works best connected behind the chin. For longe lines without a buckle, you can use a longe line attachment that clips on to the rings of the bit and has a ring in the center to clip the longe line to. These work pretty well on hard pullers.
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  17. #17
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    May. 7, 2012
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    Northwest
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    I used to clip my lunge line onto the bit and noseband together, my snap was big enough. One day my horse was being naughty and pulling, and the noseband broke. I've never done it since!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2006
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    14

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    Thank you to all for the good suggestions and photos. My horse is experienced on the lunge but sometimes forgets her manners. The report of a broken noseband was a surprise--hadn't thought about that scenario (and that is why I appreciate the collective wisdom of COTH).
    Last edited by Lolly; Jan. 9, 2013 at 05:07 PM. Reason: Correct grammar



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2011
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    46

    Default

    I use a spare flash which goes through the bit rings and I clip my lunge to that. Works great, coesn't put pressure on the mouth and saves my noseband from wear and tear.



  20. #20
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by hntrjmprpro45 View Post
    I put the lunge line through the near bit ring, under the throat latch, over the poll, under the throat latch (on the far side), then clipped to the bit ring on the far side. You will obviously have to reverse this when you reverse directions, but in my experience, this will give you the most control and stability when lunging.
    I was pretty sure that I was not picturing this correctly: it sounded like you are looping the line in a circle around horse's throat.

    then I realized throat latch = bridle part, not body part.

    all is well.


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