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  1. #21
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    Sounds like you're making progress, congratulations! I would too leave the whip at home and use baby carrots instead (I've never known a horse who didn't like those !)
    Metal bridges are scary and grated bridges even more, so take your time, stay calm but firm with small, attainable goals.
    It's always good to establish "forward when asked, always" at home before going on the trails.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  2. #22
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    Sep. 13, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoMare View Post
    I'd leave the whip at home. Ask, don't tell. Let him think. BE PATIENT.
    As George Morris says: “Temper is never right because temper is always too strong.”

    You're a new pair and he doesn't trust you yet. It has to be earned. You'll get there in time, but don't be in a hurry to do so
    Im not gonna beat him with it. Im just gonna show it behind him. He hates whips. When I (tried ) put him on the trailer to come home with me he planted his feet. would. not. move. His former rider got a buggy whip & shook it behind him. On the trailer he went ramp & all right away. Hes stubborn & needs to be shown whose boss the cowboy said to me. I think he was handled rough in his younger days but QH trainers dont put up with not doing what your told. So if its stubborn it will go away. Carrots and stick, see. If he does it without thats good for both of us & I will give him a chance to do it without & praise him when he does it.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  3. #23
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    689

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDeere View Post
    ve not taken a buggywhip to see if that would work, he hates them & I wont have one on a trail ride.
    You won't take a whip on a trail ride? I do not trail ride without one. They have many uses besides being an equine motivator, particularly dressage whips.

    A hunt whip is awesome out on the trail.
    Last edited by caballero; Jan. 14, 2013 at 06:56 PM.



  4. #24
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    Ive never needed one to make my horses go until now, what do they do besides well whip?
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  5. #25
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDeere View Post
    Ive never needed one to make my horses go until now, what do they do besides well whip?
    Well, the use of a whip, like any other aid or cue, is not black and white and is full of shades in between.

    A jumping crop is the most limited of all riding whips. It is slower to bring to bear as you need to take one hand off the reins, but it can deliver anything from a quiet tap on the shoulder to an all out sting to the flank.

    A dressage whip can be used with a lot more subtlety, anything from a tickle to a sharp sting to indicate what you want. But it can deliver the message much more quickly because one need not do anything with the reins to use it.

    Both crops and dressage whips can be used on the trail to move branches, scratch your back, knock down spider webs etc. A dressage whip can also come in handy to deal with pests on the trail such as loose dogs or humans that are up to no good.

    A hunt whip is not as handy as a crop to add emphasis to your leg aids, but it more than makes up for that in utility. The crop's handle and thong make it very easy to pick up objects from the ground that you can hook with the handle and open and close gates. A hunt whip makes short work of loose dogs bothering you, but make sure that you know how to crack it without whipping yourself or the horse and that he is broke to the noise. LOL



  6. #26
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    Sep. 13, 2006
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    Yeah hes not used to that, gunshots make him freak to. I use leg for cues on him, hes western, & crops arent used in western for anything but whippping or asking louder.

    BM checking to see if anyone is able to lead me across.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  7. #27
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDeere View Post
    I use leg for cues on him, hes western, & crops arent used in western for anything but whippping or asking louder.
    Huh? Never mind.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
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    Dallas, Georgia
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    I was not suggesting you'd beat him. You stated that he's afraid of whips, so why would you carry one and add more fear to an already fearful/tense situation? All must be positive lest you undo what you're trying to accomplish.

    Dressage whips can be used to ask for forward with wee, tiny, soft taps that reinforce your asking leg. But if you have a fearful horse, especially fearful of whips, crops, sticks, etc., you add insult to injury.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  9. #29
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    I asked BM is there was a quiet horse that mine could follow across this bridge weather was really pretty & I wanted to work on that. BM says that bridge is not for horses, they dont want horses to go across it and get to the road so dont go across it. I have been there for 2+ years went across it all the time on my old horse & now I find out we are not going across? Huh?

    So I need to find another thing to ask him to cross.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Connecticut
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    A friend of mine took a 5- to 6-foot long board, screwed long rails underneath it lengthwise to give it some height, and gave it to me to use in training my horses to cross. I used it for trailer loading training and trail class. I found out that several trail veteran horses really didn't want to go over it when asked to do so while just on a lead line. These are horses who went over bridges under saddle for years. When given the option, some preferred to balk or side step it completely. So we worked on it. I ended up with good loaders, good trail horses, and show horses who could win trail class. If you have the winter to work on this at home, and can perhaps find someone who can run up a 'bridge' for you, it might pay off for you on the trail later on down the line. Good luck with your horse.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

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