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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
    Posts
    210

    Default Advice telling BO...

    Due to a changing career and financial situation, I have decided to lease out my horse. She is healthy, sound, working on 3rd level dressage, 12 years old. Since I bought her a year and a half ago (I had known and ridden her for 5 years prior) she has been on Sentinel LS grain. It is 12% protein, 13% fat, 20% fiber with the main ingredients being beet pulp, alfalfa stem, soybean hulls. NO corn, NO molasses. I LOVE this grain. My girl looks amazing, she feels good, and I think the high fiber of the grain and of the nearly free choice hay have really gotten her stomach super healthy. Best temperament and health she's had since I've owned her. That can also be attributed to calm, all day turnout with friends. Anyway...

    The new barn she is going to does not feed my grain I was told they feed Nutrena SafeGuard, Senior, and XTN. I did my research and I don't like any of them! YIKES! XTN I am pretty sure would make her nuts, Senior doesn't have nearly enough fat for her work level, and SafeGuard has corn in questionable amounts and too much NSC. How do I ask the BO to keep her on my grain?? Her turnout will be reduced with the new lease as well. Makes me especially want to keep her on the high fiber, minimum sugar diet.

    What would you do? Would I be a PITA if I asked them to purchase her grain?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,672

    Default

    Yes, you would be a PIA if you asked them to purchase her grain. That does not mean you should not ask. Just accept that the answer might be no. Then you move on to finding if they will allow YOU to purchase her grain and they feed it for no extra fee or you provide baggies, etc.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
    Posts
    210

    Default

    That would be totally fine with me, however this lease is happening 2 hours away from me until the summer when I move. So buying it myself isn't feasible. Should I just take a deep breath, let the nutrition nut out of me, and feed her grain that the horses at that barn do well on? I would pick SafeGuard... I could just hold my breath..



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,672

    Default

    Why not have the person who is leasing her deal with this?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,005

    Default

    Why can't the leasor pick it up and bring it to the barn?

    The barn may be willing to pick it up (or have it delivered) if their normal feed store has it but you may still have to pay for it.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    You can probably work something out with their feed store so they can charge your card over the phone, then the BO can pick up your grain with her's. That's what I would do first, if it's feasible.
    Last edited by Superminion; Jan. 10, 2013 at 01:31 PM. Reason: phone...grain... same thing, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Out of the loop
    Posts
    2,845

    Default

    If the horse is thriving in her current program, I certainly wouldn't change it w/o VERY good reason. If this barn cannot meet your mare's needs, why not require that your leaser locate one that does, both nutritionally and in terms of turnout? What will happen if your horse's performance begins to deteriorate or health suffer due to changes? As the horse owner, you can set whatever requirements you want of the leaser. (And I say this having been on both sides of the lease equation!) For what sounds like a fairly well-trained horse, the leaser should be willing to jump through a hoop or two for her well-being (and continued good performance, which is in the leaser's best interest, as well as yours).
    Equinox Equine Massage

    In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me invincible summer.
    -Albert Camus


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,371

    Default

    You just say that X grain is to be fed in the lease. Not the BO's problem, not their responsibility to purchase something else. You guys have to work it out as part of the lease.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
    Posts
    210

    Default

    The reason for the lease is because I can't afford the best for her, and she deserves the best. So I am hesitant to pay for her grain. It is a full lease away from me, but a half lease between two very nice amateurs. They are already paying 450 each per month, shoes, and each 1/3 of the insurance. Is it still reasonable to ask them for grain help? Should I just talk to the BO and say I'm sorry to be a pain but can I please ask you to get this grain? Sorry for being a little neurotic about this! It is a pricey barn, big trainer, big clinics, etc. which I think might be intimidating me a bit



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    11,672

    Default

    Asking never hurt anyone. Ask. The move on using facts instead of worrying what the worse case might be.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Posts
    1,972

    Default

    Your answer is probably already in the boarding contract. There is probably something spelled out as to what they provide and how they handle feed or supplements provided by the owner. So once you've read that, the question will probably change to, "how do I tell the new leasors that they'll have the added expense of purchasing, and the added burden of providing, grain for my mare?" If your leasors are paying that much each per month then you're probably making something on the deal; figure out if you want to reduce their lease fee proportionately or pay for it yourself.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
    Posts
    210

    Default

    I'm actually still losing money as I will pay for shots and supplements.. Board at that barn is actually 900! (I know...) I will check out the boarding contract though, that is a good point. Since I'm not paying board I forgot about that



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2006
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    815

    Default

    Getting to ride a 3rd level horse for approximately $500 a month is a pretty good deal, especially because it sounds like a free lease situation on a relatively pricey horse to buy or lease.

    The 2 partboarders should split the cost of the grain.

    Don't apologize for having requirements to keep your nice horse nice. Feed is important.

    Grain is really not that expensive on the scale of all things horsey, and it shouldn't be a deal breaker.
    Proud Member of the "Tidy Rabbit Tinfoil Hat Wearers" clique and the "I'm in my 20's and Hope to be a Good Rider Someday" clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2006
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    815

    Default

    Getting to ride a 3rd level horse for approximately $500 a month is a pretty good deal, especially because it sounds like a free lease situation on a relatively pricey horse to buy or lease.

    The 2 partboarders should split the cost of the grain.

    Don't apologize for having requirements to keep your nice horse nice. Feed is important.

    Grain is really not that expensive on the scale of all things horsey, and it shouldn't be a deal breaker.
    Proud Member of the "Tidy Rabbit Tinfoil Hat Wearers" clique and the "I'm in my 20's and Hope to be a Good Rider Someday" clique



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2011
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Never hurts to ask. You won't know the answer unless you do.

    If the Senior feed doesn't have enough fat for you but meets your requirements otherwise, what about adding oil to the feed if you are unable to get her current grain?



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,592

    Default

    I love the Nutrena Pro Senior. I agree that you could always add oil or BOSS if the horse truly needed more fat.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    If the "Senior" grain is acceptable but not enough fat, just feed that and add a fat source.
    Click here before you buy.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Location
    mid-atlantic
    Posts
    2,402

    Default

    I disagree with stipulating that your horse remain on your chosen grain unless you have a documented medical reason (i.e. she tested IR or has allergies, etc.). I think horse people get very stuck in their own ways. Just because your horse does well on your program doesn't mean that she won't do well on someone else's. If these people are competent enough horse people that you will lease them your horse 2 hours away, give them the chance to take care of her too. And follow up with occasional site visits, just in case.
    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    2,911

    Default

    This horse is also going to have a big change in hay, grass, and environment. Some horses are calmer or crazier at one barn or another just based on facility layout, traffic, etc. Not to mention the 2 diff riders. So maybe you can worry about it more when the horse is moved, and you see how it goes.



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