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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
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    She's a horse. She should go outside and choose to move freely. It will also strengthen her legs and tendons and increase her circulation because she will be walking / moving around as opposed to standing in a stall. Although I believe all horses settle into a herd well and the more they are used to it and out with others, the safer it is, I do understand the risk of having a nice sport horse that you don't want to injure. Alone turnout will certainly suffice.

    Moving around will also help her gut activity, which will help her ulcers. Someone else also suggested slowly starting with an hour, then two, etc until a full day is reached. You can also be safe by putting boots on her until she settles and remembers that she is indeed an animal meant to be outside She may act crazy at first, but it is so much better for her to be out there. If she absolutely doesn't settle then come back and look at options at that point. But try these first



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
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    748

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    And yet another question... how do you feel about rain?

    There is obviously no shelter in the arena, and I have been putting her a turnout blanket with neck part whenever she's outside, but what about when it rains? Is she ok outside?



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
    Location
    Western Washington
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    2,919

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    Yes. As long as her turnout remains waterproof. And there are no thunderstorms with lightning.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2012
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    Blythewood, South Carolina
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    96

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    In reality, they're supposed to be turned out at the minimum of 15-17 hours a day? (I think that's what i've heard.) And they're supposed to be eating, but like you said she wouldn't be.. that's the problem I'd see. How much hay does she have access to?
    Remember; Ulcer prone horses get ulcers from stress which triggers the acid to rise etc etc. The more forage she has in her stomach, the less chances the acid will rise. Horses are grazing animals of course, so what you do is really up to you! I'd def. turn her out, though.
    Save The Date 08-15-2011



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
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    210

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    Waterproof sheets make rain absolutely fine. Only storms or extremely cold temp with rain keeps my mare in. When she comes in, hang the blanket to dry and put a sheet on her. Or leave the blanket on and let her body heat help evaporate the blanket.. Either way, as long as the under layer/her back doesn't get wet she can be out



  6. #26
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    Jun. 20, 2012
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    How much hay does she have access to?
    She has add lib hay, even in the arena. The grooms have been putting out a large hay net filled to its max, and yesterday when I went to get her she still had a lot.


    I know I'm being a PITA, but is it ok to ride her after she's been out on the rain? Her head would be wet and I don't know if it would be a good idea to bandage her...



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
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    16,194

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    Yes, it is fine to ride her when she's been out in the rain.

    SCMSL, do you have a trainer or mentor? I understand that you are very concerned about the health and well-being of your horse, but treating her like a fragile porcelain doll is not in her best interests. Horses do best when they are allowed to BE horses. It sounds like you are trying very hard to do that, but perhaps someone locally who can assist would be beneficial.



  8. #28
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    Jun. 20, 2012
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    SCMSL, do you have a trainer or mentor? I understand that you are very concerned about the health and well-bring of your horse, but treating her like a fragile porcelain doll is not in her best interests. Horses do best when they are allowed to BE horses. It sounds like you are trying very hard to do that, but perhaps someone locally who can assist would be beneficial.
    I do have a trainer, who actually has international success. Unlike you in the US, horses here don't usually have access to turn out, and most people will think I'm crazy to let her out on the rain. Basically what is common practice is blood mares and foals are out, sport horses are in. Period. I don't agree with this and I'm trying to find a way to make it work. But I as I don't have any personal experience with turn out and people around me already find me crazy for having her out all day, I though it would be best to ask people here, who think having them out is essential for them and who actually can answer my (very silly) questions.

    I appreciate your concern, but fortunately I have a good team of vets and farriers, and a wonderful trainer and BO. Just no experience with turning horses out.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

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    Rain won't hurt a horse. Cold won't hurt a horse. Cold and wet can make them uncomfortable. My horses are out in the weather naked spring, summer and fall. In the winter I blanket judiciously depending on the individual, but no horse of mine ever wears clothing if it's over 45 degrees unless I'm trying to keep them clean or something, regardless of precipitation.

    ETA the fact that your turnout consists of a bullring was a fairly large clue to the fact that you're not located in the USA. Good luck! Horse husbandry is very definitely different in different parts of the world, but horses are not.
    Click here before you buy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
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    Well, having posted on your other thread, if you are so worried about ulcers you need to get this horse turned out if you reasonably can. If I were in your shoes, I'd consider scrapping the uber-complex feeding regimen and paying the BO something extra to turn out an old pony with my horse for as long as possible during the day. Turnout is very helpful in dealing with ulcer-prone horses.



  11. #31
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    Jun. 20, 2012
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    I plan to eventually simplify everything out, but for now, I thinks its best to just stick to what I know works. Last time I tried to make it easier we had an ulcer flare up, and the only difference was I told them they could mix her grain into the mash. She is very sensible, and has a very stressful life, so I don't hold it against her. And although I'm looking into ways to make it less stressful, I haven't found the perfect solution yet.

    Unfortunately there are no old ponies in the property. There is a donkey but he's the foals nanny, so he's unavailable.

    I have thought of getting her a small goat, but after reading other threads, I gave up the idea. Too many people finding it brought more trouble than profit.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Location
    mid-atlantic
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    2,402

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    A lot of horses are kept in on rainy days. Or they just get part-day turnout. Personally, I don't mind a light rain because I use waterproof turnouts, but I wouldn't want my horse out in a heavy, raining-sideways downpour - especially without shelter. That's just miserable.

    In my opinion, changes at home (turnout changes, a clinic or event that generates a lot of activity, etc.) and travel are much more likely to spur an ulcer flare-up than being kept in with everyone else on a rainy crappy day. Now if she were the only horse kept in, that would be a different story - but if that's how the barn does it, I would be perfectly fine with it.
    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
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    Jun. 13, 2009
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    243

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    why is she not on regular turnout? why the seperate pen for her? and i dont mean just by herslef, why is she not just beside the other horses?



  14. #34
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    Jun. 20, 2012
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    In my opinion, changes at home (turnout changes, a clinic or event that generates a lot of activity, etc.) and travel are much more likely to spur an ulcer flare-up than being kept in with everyone else on a rainy crappy day. Now if she were the only horse kept in, that would be a different story - but if that's how the barn does it, I would be perfectly fine with it.
    Something else for me to consider, and I would be inclined to agree with you. I think she would be miserable being out with heavy rain on her.

    As for why she's not turned out with other horses, it's pretty simple. The only horses actually living outside are the brood mares and foals. The mares are a very tight unit, and the last time a boarder asked to have his mares turned out with the brood mares it was a disaster, for everybody involved. I wouldn't risk it. And even if I did, considering how things turned out with that boarder, I doubt the BO would agree to try it again.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
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    Western Washington
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    OP, I can think of only a couple reasons to keep her inside when it rains: a thunderstorm, and heavy driving winds if she doesn't have access to shelter. Or ... really sloppy, slick footing because I suspect she isn't used to that. But I'd guess the bullring has sand and drains well?



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