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  1. #81
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freebird! View Post
    OK - mind if I ask a few questions in regards to Thrush?

    If Thrush is just a bacterial infection, then why would changing the diet - cutting back the sugars - help the condition?
    Couple of reasons. Causes a change in the Ph of hoof tissues which makes them less hospitable and it changes the amount of energy food stuffs available to the bacterium.

    Why can't humans catch horse Thrush, since the bacteria that causes it, also causes sore throats in people?
    "Human infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum usually involves F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme rather than F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum, which is a common pathogen in animals. " (http://cmr.asm.org/content/20/4/622.short)

    Is Thrush NEVER compounded by a fungal infection? Because one would think that treating it with a Antibiotic AND an anti-fungal would then help?
    There are reports that sometimes there is also a fungal infection(often a species of Candida) present . It is ill advised to treat for an infection that may not be present.

    I loved the articles that Simkie posted, but has there been studies where actual infected tissue has been tested? I assume so, but the only "studies" I have come across has been from barefoot trimmers.
    I don't know if there is any peer reviewed research specific to your question. That said, every commercial nostrum, unguent, cream, whatever, has been "field tested" on countless numbers of horses. The off label use of dry cow mastitis ointment is among that group and has proven effective in most every case. That said, thrush is symptomatic of other hoof issues that cause the frog tissues to be susceptible to the pathogens responsible for thrush infections.

    So, if, like I suspect, there is often times an fungal infection, then which came first? Did the fungus start first which lead to the infection, or did the bacterial infection start, which lead to a fungal infection deep in the sulcus?
    IMNTBCHO and experience, the bacterial infection starts first. And, to complicate matters (or not ), in cases of White Line Disease, the primary pathogen is a fungus though there is often bacteria present secondarily.........

    Lastly, please don't fall into the trap of thinking that [as many barefoot care sites incorrectly state) equine thrush is a fungal infection. It's not. And if you treat a thrush infection with anti-fungals you might just as well save your money and your time.


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  2. #82
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
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    15,232

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    That said, thrush is symptomatic of other hoof issues that cause the frog tissues to be susceptible to the pathogens responsible for thrush infections.

    This would be my best guess as to how diet is an influence. High sugars, etc weaken the frog allowing it to pick up bacteria infection.


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  3. #83
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Northern California
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    Op, I feel your pain with the 'painful' treatment issues. When my mare first had her problems with thrush, she became so difficult to work with! She wouldn't pick up her feet, she would kick out in anticipation of pain (me picking at what was left of her frog) her hoof was packed and cleaned every day! Poor thing. I think as the days went on and the healing progressed most of her behavior was anticipating pain where there was not pain anymore. She was just so tired of being poked and prodded on. The silver lining was getting an excellent farrier out of it all! My vet to,d him he needed to make room for me because my mare was in bad shape! Poor girl



  4. #84
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    Oct. 14, 2007
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    California
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    Quote Originally Posted by HorseKrazy View Post
    Op, I feel your pain with the 'painful' treatment issues. When my mare first had her problems with thrush, she became so difficult to work with! She wouldn't pick up her feet, she would kick out in anticipation of pain (me picking at what was left of her frog) her hoof was packed and cleaned every day! Poor thing. I think as the days went on and the healing progressed most of her behavior was anticipating pain where there was not pain anymore. She was just so tired of being poked and prodded on. The silver lining was getting an excellent farrier out of it all! My vet to,d him he needed to make room for me because my mare was in bad shape! Poor girl

    Thank you!!! And sorry about your mare but sounds like she is doing well now. Yeah when I was picking up his hoof today he doesn't want to anticipating pain. In turn out today he was very comfortable which made me feel better too. This is going to take some time with proper shoeing and making sure to keep the thrush away.

    I suppose those deep cracks created by whatever the source - contraction etc. are a nice home for thrush to make camp as horse hooves are walking in dirt and manure all day.

    Again thank you for your encouraging words. It is hard to see your horse hurting and you are the one that has to be the bad guy.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  5. #85
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    Oct. 14, 2007
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    California
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    I cannot believe how quickly this hoof has changed for the better. I read where the wise COTHers have said in four days results - - I thought that would be impossible. Especially when I first started treating it how deep that crack was.

    Today the butt crack is just about gone.

    I just wanted to say thanks for all your advice and to say how amazed I was that they can heal so quickly once treated right. The shoeing I'm sure is part of this as well and I am just thrilled about the quick progress.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
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    My hoof issue isn't SO bad.. but still, I can't WAIT for my Tomorrow to get here!
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  7. #87
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by vxf111 View Post
    My hoof issue isn't SO bad.. but still, I can't WAIT for my Tomorrow to get here!
    Yea, when you order through the mail, usually it takes longer to get Tomorrow than it does Today.


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  8. #88
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    Oct. 6, 2002
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    Philadelphia PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Yea, when you order through the mail, usually it takes longer to get Tomorrow than it does Today.
    no irony there
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/


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  9. #89
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    I can't WAIT for my Tomorrow to get here!
    be here now



  10. #90
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Yea, when you order through the mail, usually it takes longer to get Tomorrow than it does Today.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  11. #91
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
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    227

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    I've always thought zinc oxide was more for scratches than thrush also.

    What has worked for mine every time and is not too staining or expensive: clean and soak 20 mins in warm strong Epsom salts. Allow to dry somewhat while holding it out of dirt. Pack frog and bulb if affected with Epsom salt poultice (green snotty-feeling stuff that smells like menthol-about $4 a pint at feed store, not in hoof section but liniment section). I will either work the horse in sand arena right after or sprinkle surface of gloppy sole with sand or kitty litter. This last step instead of wrapping--the sand or kitty litter keeps the snotty goo from coming off in the stall bedding, like the way you flour your hands working with bread dough. Repeat in 2 days. You should see results (mush deflates).

    I have also tried Lysol treatments as discovered on COTH and it works, better on small starting-up thrush and is good preventative. But you smell like a bathroom all day. . White lightening really works but is like running a chem lab in complexity, and I save that for actual white line disease. (Which we've never actually had.). The cow remedy also really works but is hard to find. So we've found the Epsom salts routine works best with less fuss.

    As to how to soak, I put them in wash rack and put feet in those black rubber pans (smaller is better) and then add the Epsom salt and water solution. my ponies will stand with all 4 feet in tubs. Like a pony pedi. Hand feed as needed. For hot ADHD mare, the soaking boot (IV bags or even doubled freezer bags with duct tape) at feeding time works best.

    I have the advantage of living in a dry clime, although we get thrush during our wet seasons.
    At all times, we are either training or untraining.
    Flying Haflinger blog: http://flyinghaflinger.blogspot.com/ Flying Irish Draught blog: http://flyingirishredhead.blogspot.com/



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