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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
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    Westchester County, NY
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    5,754

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    I would try to get one good soak with Clean Trax done if he is that bad. Perhaps while he's still a bit under the weather a day or two post surgery? Then I'd focus on keeping them super clean and dry, and use Kopertox per the instructions.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
    Location
    Where is gets way too cold
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    3,171

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    I have never heard of soaking a foot for thrush (maybe if the horse had a deep infection and was lame...?). I have used Clean Trax and the like for white line disease. I try to avoid softening a hoof with thrush.
    I would swab the area out thoroughly with cotton (on the tip of your hoof pick) to remove all of the diseased gunk, and then use Tomorrow or Thrush Buster. If I come across a bad case of thrush, I start with TB and then do daily follow-up with the mastitis cream. Keeping the horse in a dry area (lots of dry bedding if he's stalled), is a must.
    Does your farrier have any suggestions, having just seen the horse?
    Remember that you not only want to kill any infection, you want to do so without harming the tissue that you need to repopulate the area.
    Good luck.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    3,969

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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Any chance you are remembering incorrectly? That is a recipe for a scratches remedy not thrush to my knowledge.
    I'm sure it's been posted here as a thrush remedy. I remember because my mare had thrush at the time and I thought it would be messy to apply. Not tried it myself.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2011
    Posts
    424

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    My pony had thrush shortly after I purchased him as he acclimated from life in a dry to stall to life in a pasture that could be muddy at times. I found that really scrubbing his hooves clean at least 1x per day (I used a Betadine solution) was essential in the healing process and made more difference than anything else I tried (several commercial thrush products). I also packed regular Gold Bond Powder into the deep crack that developed in his frog and I do think that helped them stay drier.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

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    You can do WL with a shoe on, no problem. There are a lot of ways to deal with thrush but it is the best.

    You do need to figure out why this horse has such bad thrush, tho. We are full into mud season here, some horses with shoes, most not. Picked feet today, not a single horse with thrush. There is a reason your guy has it.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,733

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    Thank you all for your suggestions and ideas. LOL NO this horse is not standing in urine he was in a 12 x 12 box in training with hours of turn outs, daily grooming and hoof cleaning. A regular schedule of 5 week shoeing. I have had him four months. When he came to me he was barefoot and had the butt crack heels going on. The right foot butt crack is gone but the left one remains. But saying that, horses find a way to stand where they pee even if I clean it daily. That does make sense about Desitin...

    I recently moved my horse to my house to deal with some of his medical issues and not spend the money for a training barn and now that I get to see him daily there are some things that need to be handled. I did have my farrier and not the barns farrier shoe him today. I am very happy with the job done. The prior shoes looked very tight to me in the heel area and my farrier agreed. When I went to my barn tonight to clean his hooves with the new trim/shoe work he looks better already. I did remove the shoes in the hind since he is going to be on a short hiatus. His stall at home is a roomy 12 x 24 box cleaned twice a day bedded with shavings. He has a shelter off the back and a large paddock with dirt/DG footing. I pick his feed daily and so did the training barn where he was. Tonight I simply cleaned the hoof with water as he was in the cross ties... it was very easy to clean because of the farrier work. Then I applied the Apple Cider Vinegar and tea tree oil mixture. I did that earlier in the day as well. My farrier suggested just keeping it clean and putting whatever I used for thrush on it. He did recommend feeding Farriers Formula but stated it takes a very long time like a year to see results.

    I have read a lot about the Dry Cow that I think that is worth a try. Where do you get that product? Again, everyone thank you for your time on this.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    15,580

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    Smartpak sells these little pads soaked in thush meds. You use a hoof pick to jam them into the crevice of the frog. I *love* them for horses with deep grooves. They really stay in and are very effective. And-- no staining!
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
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    15,580

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    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
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    18,472

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    Yes, pack the crack, if the trim/shoeing job is correct it will heal quickly.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2005
    Location
    mid-Michigan
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    1,450

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    My mom's horse came with a very deep central sulcus that was all sorts thrushy, that nothing would clear up (and major crevice sure wouldn't heal until that was gone). She had good and quick success with "Ramey Goo" - a 50/50 combo of Triple Antibiotic Ointment and 1% Clotrimazole Athletes Foot Cream. Both purchased at a drug store, and packed into a syringe for application. Just pick the feet out real well and squeeze.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
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    3,394

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    Bleach is so last millennium . . .

    Thrush is an anaerobic bacterial infection. It usually starts in the layer between the old frog and the new frog being generated by the frog corium.

    Horses shed their frog in the spring and fall and sometimes more often. But each new frog is a separate entity with a distinct layer between the new and old. When anaerobic bacteria gets in between these layers and sets up house keeping it actually becomes a participant in the frog shedding process, but that can get out of hand, especially when the frog is not maintained in contact with the ground where it can be stimulated by normal weight bearing.

    In horses with very upright feet and heels left so long that the frog does not directly touch the ground, the frog becomes weak and atrophied. Eventually thrush works its way past the insensitive frog and into sensitive structures. This is most often seen in the deep central sulcus thrush where there is a split in the center of the frog that comes out the hair line between the heel bulbs.

    Treating deep sulcus thrush with a toxic antimicrobial agent is painful for the horse and it kills not only the anaerobic bacteria, but also kills the new cells that would otherwise fill in the area as it tries to heal after killing the infection.

    OTC antibiotics like dry cow mastitis treatment have been used by educated, up to date, hoof care providers with great success (like 100% IMEs) on deep sulcus thrush for over a decade. If your hoof care provide hasn't heard of it they must live under a rock or something.

    Today or Tomorrow or whatever brand, they all work just as well on deep sulcus thrush as they do on mastitis. Just insert the tip of the plastic syringe into the crack (GENTLY) and squirt some in there till it runs out. It won't be painful for the horse and it won't kill off any new cells that are generated in the process of closing the wound. Push a cotton ball in behind it. Repeat daily till the infection clears up - which you will know because the crack will be gone. But seriously, don't inject Durasole, bleach, copper tox, diaper rash ointment, use motor oil or any thing like that into the deep sulcus. You are treating an open wound. If you must flush it before injecting the antibiotic, use plain water. But that really isn't necessary because you can flush it by injecting extra antibiotic until it displaces the gunk.

    Thrush in other parts of the frog - insensative - can be treated with whatever toxic stuff you want to throw at it. As a preventive, something that sticks around and provides some residual disinfecting action (Durasole, thrush buster, copper tox, iodine) is better than something like bleach that only works for a few minutes and then dissipates.

    Injecting anything toxic into the deep sulcus split type of thrush might get your head kicked off when the horse feels the sensitive tissue in there burning and he can't get away from it because it is enclosed with no way to evaporate.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    1,319

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    I've had luck with Dry Cow or Tomorrow. Sold at Tractor Supply. I've coved with woder dust or soaked cotton stuffed into crevice. For minor, run of the mill thrush Coppertox work well.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2012
    Posts
    436

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    Tom Bloomer is right on...Today or Tomorrow applied EXACTLY how he states is a guaranteed fix IME...I get mine at Farm and Fleet



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
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    3,733

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    Quote Originally Posted by AzulBlue View Post
    Tom Bloomer is right on...Today or Tomorrow applied EXACTLY how he states is a guaranteed fix IME...I get mine at Farm and Fleet

    Just ordered a few boxes of ToMORROW. It will be here in a few days. No where in my area stocks it on the shelves. I guess we don't have too many cows around here anymore.

    Thank you everyone. I am glad this will be so much easier than soaking for 20. Not that I am trying to get out of doing this; it's just really hard right now for him to be a good boy. He is trying very hard to be good.....
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
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    Question, could I treat with a triple antibiotic until the ToMORROW arrives?
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

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    Let me defend my archaic stance by amending that I would NOT use bleach in a deep sulcus or in the cleft of the frog. Just on grody surface stuff.
    Click here before you buy.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2002
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    6,160

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    Ditto Tom Bloomer. When I got my filly, she had thrush so bad that her feet bled. What I did for her, was cleaned the hooves really well - for the dee stuff, I used a flathead screwdriver covered with a gauze pad. Then I squirted Today up in the deep grooves, and then packed them with cotton to keep the dirt out, and meds in. You can buy the main ingredient in White Lightening, for way cheaper, but I'm on a phone, and the name escapes me right now. The Today should work though, along with ensuring the horse is getting a proper trim, to encourage the heels to spread out.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    503

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    What worked very well for my mare (she had very severe trush) is a 7% iodine solution poured directly on the affected part of the hoof. 3 days after I could see a 60% amelioration.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2012
    Posts
    65

    Default CURE THE CRUD QUICK!

    The ONLY thing that truly works for Thrush and WORKS FAST!
    I used this on a horse we bought with the worst thrush you could imagine. Looked like canker, but all vets and our farrier said it was just a horrible case of thrush.
    within 5 days--- it was gone without a trace.
    I keep it on hand and use it once a week as a preventative.

    CHEAP, EASY and AMAZING! gentle too!

    a 50/50 combo of Triple Antibiotic Ointment (neosporin) and 1% Clotrimazole Athletes Foot Cream. Both purchased at walmart or similar, and packed into an oral dosing syringe for application. Just pick the feet out real well and squeeze a bit down the crevices and put horse in a DRY stall- repeat every day (we did twice- am and pm)



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
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    9,660

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    There are tons of cows in parts of Chino so I wonder if R&L Feed would have it. They're in Ontario on East End, north of Philadelphia. 909-628-7016. Not super close to you, but fairly close to the place your horse is likely to go for his surgery. Generally good prices on both supplies and feed. Inland Vet (in Norco, and maybe other places) might have it also. It will probably come by the time you could get to Norco, but they might ship.

    At one point my horses, including one who lived outside in a periodically-muddy paddock, were the only two horses in a training barn that did NOT have thrush. I must have been doing something different when I cleaned feet than the other people and/or the grooms. Different training barn, and discipline, than now.
    The Evil Chem Prof



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