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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2012
    Posts
    27

    Default Jolly Green Giant!!!

    Hey there!!! My aunt is asking for my help with her new 18 hand horse she got that is green. He hasnt had much work done with him at all and when it comes time to get down to work he runs away like the typical male. i have some ideas on what to do to get him used to work and other things but was curious if there were any suggestions as to what might help him not run away from us. (we lunge him in a bridle and bit, but we arent sure if we have found the right bit for him yet)

    Thanks!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2005
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Do you mean that he is difficult to catch, or that he's bolting while being led or worked on the longe?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2006
    Location
    Florida
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    3,131

    Default

    What kind of experience do you or your aunt have? And how green is this guy? Did he have any training prior to your aunt getting him?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2012
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    Default

    i have trained 5 other horses prior to him and she just got him, he hasnt had much done. he bolts when lunging, hes okayyyy on the ground he could be better.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2007
    Posts
    963

    Default

    How old? What breed? What is it that your aunt ultimately wants to do with him?



  6. #6
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    Jul. 6, 2012
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    27

    Default

    8 tb/draft cross she just wants him to be safe and be able to ride around. i have no problem doing that, i know how to do that, i just dont want to have raw hands from working with him on the lunge line because he just drags us everywhere



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2007
    Posts
    963

    Default

    Do you have access to a round pen? A nice, large one with good footing would be my recommendation. I wouldn't recommend any type of gadget without an experienced trainer on hand to help out. As for bits, I've had good success with a waterford. Not too harsh, but breaks up in the mouth in a way that it's hard for them to grab the bit and run.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    Boogerville, USA
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    858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wakefield121409 View Post
    ... i just dont want to have raw hands from working with him on the lunge line because he just drags us everywhere
    Wear gloves.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Calera, AL
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    1,901

    Default

    I know people think lunging is the end all-be all, but really, why are you lunging him? And yes, round pen and gloves are your friends if you think you must lunge.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    I'm with alabama. 100% My mare was a fruitloop until I figured out how to lunge her properly.

    You aren't going to be able to stop a train that big, if he really wants to go. A round pen with real walls will be your friend. Have you had his teeth looked at? I've found it cures many naughty horse problems when the problems relate to bolt, bit grabbing, head tossing, and evading. Try a 3 piece, that's the only thing Herself will let in her delicate mouth. *eyeroll* I use a loose ring french link.

    Also. When he bolts, don't try to drag him around in a circle right away. Put constant pressure on his mouth and he'll just put his fingers (er.. hooves) in his ears in a "LALALALA I can't hear you!!!" fashion. Short, sharp tugs *upward* can be helpful as an on the ground e-break.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,915

    Default

    Have your aunt act as assistant and walk at his head to begin with. Work him in a small area even if you don't have a round pen. Walk only for the first couple of lessons if that's all he will stay calm at. If he's green I would not attach the line to his bit. Either use a longeing cavesson or a converter (basically a strap with two buckles for the halter and a loop to clip the line to) attached to his halter. Wear gloves and educate yourself on longeing body language and use of the whip.

    Longeing can be an art form or just holding on while the horse runs in circles.
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    14,307

    Default

    You won't hold him in a lungeing cavesson - try a Schiffley bit - or something that means business until he learns. He's learned the trick now and will keep trying it.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
    Posts
    6,207

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    Stud chain... and gloves. Never lunge without gloves.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
    Location
    Desert Southwest
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    6,285

    Default

    Foxtrot's, did you mean a chiffney bit?

    OP, sounds like this horse needs a pro, big as he is. And 8 years old and green? Yikes.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2006
    Location
    Florida
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    3,131

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    I second a stud chain, GLOVES, and a waterford bit. I love it. And lots of ground work. He's not going to respect you lungeing, or under saddle, if he doesn't respect your presence and authority leading him around. Do different excercises with him; teach him to back up, teach him to yield his front and back end from pressure, teach him to drop his head with poll pressure, teach him to turn (while leading) just with your body turing into him; shouldn't have to pull on the lead rope to turn or stop.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
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    5,105

    Default

    ANother vote for a chain.

    My gelding (although small) would do the same thing...be going along perfectly fine, then the little @!)$#*! woudl just throw his shoulder out, and go. Gloves didn't even help me hold on.

    THe solution was to lunge with the stud chain over his nose, and only give him as much lunge as he would use to behave himself. Too much line = too much leverage for him to use against you. I would slowly work out the line at each sesson. When the line is shorter, and he tries to bolt, you have a much better chance at snapping that line and getting his attention wtih teh stud chain over his nose.

    We went through this for a while, but now my guy lunges respectfully, without a chain.

    When they get away with it, it encourages them even more the next time!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
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    8,115

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    another vote for a professional trainer in an adequate facility and lessons for Aunt when the horse is further along with training.

    This is a huge accident in the making.
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18

    Default

    I've known several drafts who use some form of escaping when they feel pressured or they don't understand or you know, they've just figured out they're very large and you can't really do much to stop them if they decide they're gone.

    I would probably back off from lunging directly (because it's true, if you can't hold him back if he decides he's going and you don't want to turn it into a physical fight, with more gadgets/stronger bit, or otherwise). I'd go back down to lots of respect on the ground exercises. Use a rope halter or something if you want, do it in the round pen so there's not much distraction. Practice leading and having him stop when you stop. Have him back up with barely touching his face. Have him move his hindquarters away from you when you say so. Have him trot when you jog, stop again when you stop. Really get him tuned in to you.

    Then go back to the round pen for lunging but again, make it so he's not just going around and around in circles but listening to you. Make sure he understands what you actually want out of him...has he ever really been lunged before? I might even do it with just a lunge whip and no line so I'm not fighting his face if he takes off.

    And if he does decide to say 'eff you lady I'm running', keep him moving until he's tired of running. Don't chase after him, just keep him moving, he slows down, flick the whip. And when you're finally ready to let him take a rest and he's beyond ready, then tell him easy and let him walk. But make it be your idea.

    Another thing to keep in mind on the ground is I've known several drafty types who've figured out the idea that if they bend their head away from you while walking, they can leverage the lead rope against their shoulder and take it away from you and go off where ever they please and you've got no leverage to stop them. So don't give him the chance to even get that far.

    Honestly, unless there's something else that you didn't say here, I'm not sure why you're lunging him anyway since presumably he's already used to how the tack feels. But if he is running off I expect it's either to get out of work (hence making him keep moving so it's still work and not funtime) or he doesn't actually understand (hence backing off to in-hand work and moving back up again).

    But the basic thing is you don't want to make this into a physical fight between you and the horse because if you let it get that far, the horse will win. It's simple physics.
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    10,465

    Default

    Before your Aunt gets too attached, and or too hurt, I'd find another home for him, and buy something more suitable.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    Gloves and running shoes with cleats (or are those football shoes) on them should be standards when lunging.

    A rp is a GREAT idea.

    My arms are longer due to the fact I didn't have one. Got one now. Whew.

    Maybe a footwear princess, or shoe princess could chime in on what footwear would be best.

    18H oh wow oh boy ! ! ! !

    Good luck. :+)



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