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  1. #41
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    I just adopted a young dog from a group that uses all foster homes for rescue. They pull from county shelters w/ high kill rates. This dog was fostered for 6 weeks; he came crate trained, mostly housebroken, good with cats, fully vetted, neutered, tested and with a small infection cleared up. I received copies of the vet papers - total was between $225 and $250. I paid $300 for the dog. Really I thought it was worth every penny - everything they told me about him was spot on, no health surprises, and a very easy time of getting him settled into the routine. Those who foster, IMO, do a great service to the dogs and to the potential adopters.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........


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  2. #42
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    Jun. 16, 2011
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    We are also looking at adult dogs, still young but not puppies. It seems everything around here is a pit, lab, beagle or all three together. None of these are on are list of what we keep looking.

    I did ask at school today in my classes and got a lead on a boxer in case the one we hope to get goes to one of the people that applied to him before us.



  3. #43
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    Jul. 26, 2001
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    Toronto, Canada.
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    Breed specific rescues generally charge more (ie Golden Rescue is $700 for a dog). I would ensure if you are going to spend this price on a rescue that you ensure the rescue group is actually putting all of the money back into the rescue. The Golden Rescue group here, often spends $5000+ on their dogs. Many of them are surrendered because they need expensive surgeries that owners cant afford.

    Smaller private rescues have to charge more, their overhead is large. Larger groups such as humane societies/animal services are often partially funded by governments and they have cheaper spay/neuters as theyare done on site.

    I have no issue paying a good amount on a rescue if its the dog that I like. A purebred dog from a GOOD breeder is likely going to be more in the $1000-$2000 pricerange, not $500.



  4. #44
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    Sep. 13, 2008
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    Vermont
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    I recently, Nov., adopted a Doberman through DRU in New Hampshire. It was an extensive process. I first printed and filled out an extensive form from their site. Then they called and had a long talk with me. Then my landlord. Then my dog vet. Then they asked if I had a vet who comes to my home. I said I did and he was due to draw blood from my donkey right away. they then talked with him. They got a real good report apparently as they did not send their outreach worker over for the mandatory home visit. I have no issues with their throughness, and would not expect less. Their number one concern is the animal will have excellent care and will stay where it goes for its entire life. All the questions they ask in my opinion are very relevant to the animals health and in finding the perfect match.

    He had been seen by their vet. Had been tested for heartworm and started on a preventative. He had been tested for three tick borne diseases. He had spent a lot of time with their trainer, who by the way , was NOrweigian and trains and competes in ski jouring with her dogs. I am very impressed with their facility and the care and love the dogs receive. My boy had only been there two weeks, long enough to evaluate and place. They said they could place a dog like him a hundred times a week and he indeed is some sweet. He sleeps with me and it a big blanket hog but I can deal.

    I was asked for a $300 donation. I was not at all put off by this. The Doberman breeders I would consider buying from get 10 X that amount of money.

    Being a Blue, as about 90% are, he is affected by Blue Doberman Syndrome, or color mutant alopecia if one prefers. I did rather prefer a black or red because of the issues involved with this disorder, as I have had blues and a fawn in the early 80's. But Ozzy is worth the extra care and dollars to treat him and I could not be happier with the adoption process. I do believe there are rescues out there who are not what they should be and one must be careful in choosing where to adopt. I chose adoption right now as I only want a Doberman and prior experience has shown me that Dobe pups do not house train easy in the winter. I will be shopping for a pup in the spring to become my next assistance dog. Hopefully my spine will hold up long enough for me to make her into some help for me.


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  5. #45
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    Dec. 2, 2002
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    Berlin, Germany
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenryisBlaisin' View Post
    I disagree with this. ANY dog in a kill shelter is in danger. Hundreds of healthy and adoptable dogs are euthanized every day in shelters. When rescues spend so much time and resources on saving one dog that needs medical or behavioral rehab that they could have saved multiple others, that's not the best use of that money or those resources.

    We see the same thing with horse rescues...some choose to take on one horse that, even with extensive measures, will never be more than pasture sound, and has little chance of being adopted, meaning it will sap foster resources for a long time, perhaps years. If they had chosen instead to give that one horse a day of pampering and a dignified end, they could have taken on several more with he time, money, and space they would have saved.

    IMO, responsible rescues know that you can't save every animal, and so take on the ones that have the best chance of a long healthy life. Putting one animal over many just to say they "saved" it isn't really the best use of a rescue's limited resources.
    I think you are misunderstanding me. I completely understand that all shelter dogs are in danger- my own dog is a shelter pit that was 24 hours away from being euthanized, and the shelter waived her $65 adoption fee because she was a staff favorite. In fact, my city shelter has events where adoption fees are waived or deeply discounted during certain times of the year (ie, in October, all orange adult cats have adoption fees waived, and all black adult dogs have adoption fees waived. During the month of February, "bonded pairs" have adoption fees waived).

    What I mean is that most shelters don't, and should not invest time and money into dogs that are not almost immediately adoptable due to injury, sickness, or the need for lengthy rehab of some kind. They just don't have the resources for that. Their focus and work is for animals that need immediate housing and for which appropriate homes can be found in a short period of time.

    On the other hand, the focus of a well-run (emphasis on well run) rescue is to save animals that CAN live quality lives with more time, money, and care. Perhaps it angers people that rescues could allocate their resources saving more healthy animals in shelter environments, but these are organizations with different goals entirely.

    Being able to identify poorly-run rescues is important. A $500 adoption fee is extremely high. Is this typical for the rescue? Does the rescue have a lot of dogs that appear unhealthy despite a lot of vet care? Does it seem like the dogs the rescue has in its care are reflective of the organization's mission statement? Are the demands they make of adoptees unreasonable (must have a fenced yard, dog must never be left alone, home checks can be done unannounced at any time, the dog remains property of the rescue for life, etc...)?

    I am thrilled beyond thrilled with my shelter dog, and think my city shelter does a great job doing what it does. Because of that, I won't adopt a dog from a rescue. But I also know a lot of dogs that have come into my city shelter with horrific injuries have been saved and later adopted out by rescues that work closely with my city shelter, and for that, I am grateful, not angry that such rescues operate charging higher adoption fees to cover the costs they incur.
    Here today, gone tomorrow...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46

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    I also think that five hundred is high compared to the rescues in our area, but we paid around three hundred for each of our rescue dogs. The advantages, both came from caring places who were upfront and honest about the dogs potential training issues, interviewed us, made home visits, and in general did much for the welfare of the animals in our care.

    The matches we made were perfect and i love the dogs completely. OTOH we did buy a dog from a breeder previously, the dog cost 1500 dollars, and had none of her basic veterinary care. Sure there was a piece of paper saying she was pure, but the shot series, spaying, etc added another five hundred to her price. Sure, we adore her,and her breeder was a very responsible breeder, certifying all of her breeding dogs for heart, limbs and kidney care, and also interviews us.

    However, when the three dogs are lying together on the couch giving me my morning couch cuddle, you cannot tell the difference between them.

    I would like to end with a comment about the rather glib statment i have heard many times recently. " Euthanasia is not the worst end to life".. perhaps so, but ending a life that has much promise, the potential to play, and offer non judgemental love and loyalty, ending that life is significant, and simply sending them all to their death because they are inconvenient is a rather awful human characteristic, imho.


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  7. #47
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    Feb. 28, 2005
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    On the Maryland Side of the Beltway
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    When we were looking to adopt a dog last spring, we too were amazed by some of the fees charged by some rescues...the fees varried widely in our area. Many were in the $250-$350 range, but we saw some as high as $450-500 as well. My husband and I weren't opposed to paying whatever adoption fee/donation for whatever dog we fell in love with...but we were surprised by some rescues where either the fee was very high for a puppy that wouldn't be spayed/neuter by the time you adopted it, and would be paying for the spay/neuter on your own...or dogs who came into the rescue already spayed/neutuered, but you were still paying the same fee as dogs where the rescue had payed for the surgery. I understand that the funds from healthier dogs go to help cover costs for the dogs needing more expensive care...but still...

    We too had an adoption application turned down by a rescue for what seemed like an unreasonable situation - we have a fenced yard...but the fence on one side is lower than I would like for a dog (long story, but that side of the fence belongs to our neighbor and was already in when we fenced the rest of the yard...the other sides are 6'fence), so before adopting a dog, we installed an e-fence inside our physical fence to help ensure the future dog would stay in our yard. We were turned down by a rescue that requires a fenced yard...but will not consider adopting to a home with an e-fence. Eventhough we had a fenced yard, we were denied because of the additional e-fence...and told if we didn't have the e-fence, but just had our physical fence, we'd have been approved

    In the end, the dog we fell in love with was a stray in the local shelter one county over from us...we saw her photos online, met her, and it was a match. We were pleasantly surprised when we read her adoption contract and found that the adoption fees were calculated based on what things the dog had required while in the shelter's care. As our pup was already spayed when she was picked up as a stray, her adoption fee came to a whopping $32. I had gone to pick her up on my own, as my husband had to go out of town on a business trip after we had our meet and greet at the shelter...When he was going over our bank statement the following month, he asked if I'd gotten a parking ticket that I had forgotten to mention as he saw that I'd written a check to the county government for $32...and got a big kick out of it when I reminded him that was our dog...a ticket in that county is more expensive!
    ~Drafties Clique~Sprite's Mom~ASB-loving eventer~
    www.gianthorse.photoreflect.com ~ http://photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/


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  8. #48
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    Chisamba,

    Thank you discussing this "euthanasia is not the worst end to life". It was glib and the idea of it makes me very sad. The animals that are killed are not all sick and suffering. We kill a few million dogs and cats in shelters every year in the USA and most of them are sweet, beautiful, young, healthy, and full of potential. A while ago there was a photo series of pictures of dogs and cats at shelters before they were killed. I did not have the courage to look at it beyond the first picture. Thinking about it now makes me cry.

    I found it http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...#slide=1186262

    Paula
    Last edited by paulaedwina; Jan. 9, 2013 at 09:38 AM. Reason: Added link
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
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    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    My local shelter has a "Guardian Angel" program. People pick an animal and donate money, half of which goes to the shelter & the other half is deducted from the adoption fee. If you donate $50, the shelter uses $25 and the other $25 is deducted from the adoption fee, so if it's a $100 fee the adopter will only pay $75. The cages/kennels of these animals all have little angel signs on them.



  10. #50
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    Sep. 24, 2009
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    Something that is worth looking into re spay/neutering and shelter dogs -

    My first dog came from the shelter and was on his last day there. We got him for $35 with nothing - he needed all his shots and was not neutered, which was fine.

    My bird vet also took care of dogs, so we took Murphy over there as soon as we could for shots. He also had hookworms and kennel cough, both easily treated. The vet told us about a program with the state of NJ where a shelter dog can be nuetered/spayed for a very reduced cost. He was a vet that participated in this program and offered us one of the 'spots' to get the dog fixed cheaply. I think the vet donated part of the cost and the state donated part, then we paid $50. This was around 17 years ago.

    So anyway, it may be worthwhile asking around to see if your state has such a program if you get a shelter dog.



  11. #51
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    In my area of KY, the local Humane Society will give you a voucher towards a spay or neuter at a slightly reduced cost, regardless of where you get the dog. The rescue I used to volunteer with (too much people drama) would refund $50 of a puppy adoption fee once they received the neuter/spay documentation.

    Regarding the e fence...I can see a very fearful dog having a problem with an e fence, but I would hope the rescue could be smart enough to realize when was appropriate and when it's not. A lot of them run on emotion, not facts unfortunately.

    I have to say, my experience with the rescue really turned me off to most rescues. It's really a shame. I imagine the next dog I get, I'll just pull from the shelter myself.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  12. #52
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    Apr. 14, 2010
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    PNW
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    When we had to put our dog down last year, we went looking through adoption agencies to adopt another dog. What I saw was the breed specific rescues of a highly desirable breed were charging 500 while all the other adult dogs of non-highly desirable breeding were anywhere from 75-250 dollars (with puppies being around 400 dollars as those tend to be more desirable than adult dogs hence people's willingness to pay more). I think 500 dollars is high, but that is just my opinion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    They certainly shouldn't be free - studies show that they're treated with more value if they actually cost something, but I agree that it's gotten out of hand. Too expensive = people getting their pets elsewhere = more pets that are not adopted = more expenses for the caretakers = high adoption fees.
    Not sure what studies, but we have adopted two dogs (one from a private facility and one from the shelter) for free. We love them dearly and they are members of our family, having to have paid to adopt them would not have changed that. Also we have been given two horses, one I fixed the training issues and sold on to a great home, the other I still have and plan on keeping. If those horses had not been free, I probably would not have ended up with them and for the one with training issues that would have been really sad.... I do not know where she would have ended up.



  13. #53
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    Dec. 29, 1999
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    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    Me, too. Price would make no difference to me, but then, you and I are responsible people.

    Maybe it's just more rescue crapola - "you have to pay a lot of $$$ or else you'll be more likely to abandon your pet." That could be it, too.



  14. #54
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    Me, too. Price would make no difference to me, but then, you and I are responsible people.

    Maybe it's just more rescue crapola - "you have to pay a lot of $$$ or else you'll be more likely to abandon your pet." That could be it, too.
    Might be just a load of manure. I know my daughter's Pre-K through 12 private school gave underprivileged kids scholarships but made them pay something on the premise that they valued it more if they had to pay for it. I sure hope there were studies to back that up.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  15. #55
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    Me, too. Price would make no difference to me, but then, you and I are responsible people.

    Maybe it's just more rescue crapola - "you have to pay a lot of $$$ or else you'll be more likely to abandon your pet." That could be it, too.
    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Might be just a load of manure. I know my daughter's Pre-K through 12 private school gave underprivileged kids scholarships but made them pay something on the premise that they valued it more if they had to pay for it. I sure hope there were studies to back that up.
    I am sure there are studies to back it up, certainly anecdotal evidence.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luseride View Post
    One I saw this morning was $500! I understand they have expenses and stuff but for that price I want a registered dog.
    You won't get a registered dog from a quality breeder for $500.

    My highschool friend's parents recently paid $1,500 for a mini schnauzer, and her brother paid $2,500 for a westie.

    Not including, of course, the spay and neuter they had to then additionally do on their own dime.

    Of course, these were reputable breeders, one of whom required my friend's parents to pick up their dog over a time period of THREE DAYS (this was a 7 hour drive away, so it required a hotel and a three day weekend), so he could feel adequately reassured that they were properly vetted, properly instructed in the care of their new dog, and would provide a suitable home.



  17. #57
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    Jul. 20, 1999
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    CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    They certainly shouldn't be free - studies show that they're treated with more value if they actually cost something, but I agree that it's gotten out of hand. Too expensive = people getting their pets elsewhere = more pets that are not adopted = more expenses for the caretakers = high adoption fees.
    Actually, studies show just the opposite. When it comes to cats and dogs, the price people pay for them has no bearing on how they will be treated. Which is why shelters see pets people spent hundreds or thousands to purchase surrendered all the time. Our shelter adopted a differential fee ranging from $20 to $290 and often has pick your price or free adoption events (esp for cats). There is zero difference in return rates or future abandonment rates. Similar studies have proven that the third inquisition with long forms, landlord checks, etc. have no bearing on how an animal will be kept/treated, either. Most progressive shelters have moved away from those to a friendlier, more trusting experience, which ultimately helps animals find homes.

    Some rescues are great, some are glorified hoarders. Keep in mind that all SPCAs and Humane Societies in the states are independent, so the way one operates is very likely different from the way another does. Rescue groups even more so.



  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLBGP View Post
    Actually, studies show just the opposite. When it comes to cats and dogs, the price people pay for them has no bearing on how they will be treated. Which is why shelters see pets people spent hundreds or thousands to purchase surrendered all the time. Our shelter adopted a differential fee ranging from $20 to $290 and often has pick your price or free adoption events (esp for cats). There is zero difference in return rates or future abandonment rates. Similar studies have proven that the third inquisition with long forms, landlord checks, etc. have no bearing on how an animal will be kept/treated, either. Most progressive shelters have moved away from those to a friendlier, more trusting experience, which ultimately helps animals find homes.

    Some rescues are great, some are glorified hoarders. Keep in mind that all SPCAs and Humane Societies in the states are independent, so the way one operates is very likely different from the way another does. Rescue groups even more so.
    That's really interesting. Do you have the studies? I'd love to pass them on to a couple of rescues.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  19. #59
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLBGP View Post
    Actually, studies show just the opposite. When it comes to cats and dogs, the price people pay for them has no bearing on how they will be treated. Which is why shelters see pets people spent hundreds or thousands to purchase surrendered all the time. Our shelter adopted a differential fee ranging from $20 to $290 and often has pick your price or free adoption events (esp for cats). There is zero difference in return rates or future abandonment rates. Similar studies have proven that the third inquisition with long forms, landlord checks, etc. have no bearing on how an animal will be kept/treated, either. Most progressive shelters have moved away from those to a friendlier, more trusting experience, which ultimately helps animals find homes.

    Some rescues are great, some are glorified hoarders. Keep in mind that all SPCAs and Humane Societies in the states are independent, so the way one operates is very likely different from the way another does. Rescue groups even more so.
    Our local shelter has started the same thing as well, and I am glad to see it because it has significantly reduced euthanasia rates. They do have adoption counselors who sit down with adopters and help them choose an appropriate pet and go over average costs of pet ownership. I absolutely agree with more progressive policies, especially for high volume shelters. Customer service is very important, and I think that a lot of groups forgot that for a long time, driving potential adopters away.
    At the same time, I can understand why some of the smaller groups operate differently. Breed rescues, especially, tend to have more restrictive rules and that doesn't bother me as long as the dogs are well cared for. I have been turned down by breed rescue because I didn't have a fenced yard at the time. I never allow my dogs to run free, but I think that they have a good life with exercise and activity. I've seen people with fences leave the gate open (and not accidently) and have dogs running all over the neighborhood and in front of cars. I think it is a silly rule, but I still donate to breed rescue because I think that they do good work and the people who run it are putting in a lot of time and money to do things in a way that works for them. I suspect that one day they will reconsider that rule, but it really is okay. I see so many people who have been turned down as an adopter by a group freak out and denounce all rescues while they hysterically insist that they take great care of their pets. Not everything is personal. Yes, some groups have some silly rules, but if you want a rescue dog and you don't have a criminal background of animal abuse, you can probably get one.
    There are also some bad rescues out there. I don't necessarily worry if an animal spends longer than average in rescue, as long as the care is appropriate. Stories about people going to a rescue and seeing animals being neglected are horribly, but I don't think that all rescue groups should be judged by that any more than all pet owners should be judged by the neglectful ones.


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  20. #60
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    You won't get a registered dog from a quality breeder for $500.

    My highschool friend's parents recently paid $1,500 for a mini schnauzer, and her brother paid $2,500 for a westie.

    Not including, of course, the spay and neuter they had to then additionally do on their own dime.

    Of course, these were reputable breeders, one of whom required my friend's parents to pick up their dog over a time period of THREE DAYS (this was a 7 hour drive away, so it required a hotel and a three day weekend), so he could feel adequately reassured that they were properly vetted, properly instructed in the care of their new dog, and would provide a suitable home.
    Hmm....well, most quality breeders won't have puppies for $500, but some will - especially, for example, well-bred puppies that either have a chance of going under/over the breed standard size, and/or that have some other *flaw* that don't make them show-quality (aka breeding-quality). Some breeders don't sell their "pet quality" dogs for less than their "show quality" dogs, but it does depend on many things. If you know what you want, and get to know the breeders, you might be surprised.

    My show dog did not cost anywhere near $2500, and has more than an impressive pedigree. I can't imagine what on earth someone is thinking of when buying a dog for that price and then neutering it! That is insane! For a show dog/breeding-quality dog, that price might be reasonable for many breeds, but for a pet...?

    Sorry, but I do have to wonder about the details on that story and/or the determination that this is a reputable breeder - the fact that the breeder waited until the puppy was ready to be picked up to decide whether the buyer was good enough? And if not, did they have a backup buyer? The buyers for my dog's litter were "vetted" before the puppies were even born, but even if you don't have them all lined up before that, the breeder has 8 more weeks to figure it out before he/she lets them leave home.



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