The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,441

    Default Anyone had a horse so sensative you couldn't groom with a rubber mit?

    I have a youngster who is so sensitive from his wither to his tail (on his topline) that he nearly drops his hind end to the floor if you use a rubber nippled (sorry can't think of how else to describe it) wash mit (with the bristles on the other side) or if you use a rubber scrubber to shed out spring hair.

    This sensitivity carries over to riding, where he is very sensitive to your seat (almost too much)

    Any ideas of what it could be...?? He is 90% TB, so maybe he's just sensitive because of that?

    (I did have him tested for lyme, which came up negative)
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2011
    Location
    Lakeland, FL
    Posts
    83

    Default

    It sounds like your horse has super sensitive panniculus nerves. That's the subcutaneous nerve group that covers the horse like a blanket from his neck to his tailbone. He uses those nerves to sense the presence of flies and they are so sensitive he can quiver only the muscles directly under that individual fly to shake it off.

    There may be some sort of vertebrae compression affecting the sensitivity of that response. A veterinary pinnaculus reflex test might shed some light on that. Or a session with a good professional equine chiropractor may also be in order.

    Good luck! ~FH


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3

    Default

    My girl doesn't like a rubber sweat scraper. Is your youngster under 6, so young enough that his spine is still changing? Perhaps he'll grow out of this.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 3, 2002
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    962

    Default

    Yup, I have one that's also super sensitive to those rubber n_______ed tools, lol, in fact he will put his ears back and tell ya to "get that thing away from me."
    And he's also super sensitive under saddle. I can't use any synthetic bristled body brushes on him either , he has his own 'speshul' real hair bristle FACE brush that's super soft and gentle so we do all body brushing with that.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Location
    The Isle of Wight
    Posts
    737

    Default

    Try a rub rag, like the ones they sell on Bit of Britain, or maybe a cactus cloth.

    I have a thin-skinned TB myself and he doesn't object to to those two things. He hates that thing with the bristles on one side and the brush on the other, like this. I think the little nub things on the curry side are too hard.

    But, he does like this one. The bristles are more like fingers that are gummy and soft. He does not object to it on his body or his face, so it might be worth a try for your horse.

    Good Luck!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,089

    Default

    My horse hates the rubber pimple mitts, and also hates the large black rubber curry combs. As a joke, I started using a small, pink, heart-shaped, glitter curry comb--the kind the little girls at the barn think is great--and found out that he adores it! So, in the summer, that's what we use. Looks kind of ridiculous using that on a big, beefy Percheron, but hey, whatever works!
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,401

    Default

    If they don't like them, don't use them. I have found most horses like the shed flower if I need something curry-like. A cactus cloth is another good alternative.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2005
    Location
    SW Fla
    Posts
    125

    Default

    You might want to research magnesium deficiency. I use MagRestore with good results.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,441

    Default

    I don't usually groom him with those, but just was giving him a bath yesterday and tried.

    I have had a chiropractor look at him but he wasn't overly concerned with his vertebrae .

    I have considered magnesium as he has over sensitive nerves.

    Thanks for the info on the Pinnaculus reflex test....I'll check into that. He is a lovely horse.....I just wish he were a hair less sensitive!! He is totally sound, and a lovely mover. I don't think it's a neurological problem.

    If anyone else has any suggestions, please pass them on......
    Last edited by florida foxhunter; Jul. 14, 2013 at 04:46 PM.
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2013
    Location
    Florida USA
    Posts
    413

    Default

    How about using a hay wisp and a rub rag? You can braid your own wisp and it wouldn't cost you a thing but hay. I agree with the cactus cloth idea and I am a gigantic fan of a rub rag.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,441

    Default

    Thanks for the grooming ideas, but that wasn't really what I was trying to find out in this post. I was wondering if anyone had a horse this sensitive and if they ever found a reason.............
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by florida foxhunter View Post
    Thanks for the grooming ideas, but that wasn't really what I was trying to find out in this post. I was wondering if anyone had a horse this sensitive and if they ever found a reason.............
    My horse had Lyme and was extremely deficient in Vit. E.....when his E level was brought up and his Lyme treated he was much better about grooming.
    Also he was very sensitive under saddle....would sink at times from saddle....that totally stopped when vit E level went back up!
    Last edited by Parrotnutz; Jul. 14, 2013 at 10:15 PM. Reason: Add more info
    Adriane
    Happily retired but used to be:
    www.ParrotNutz.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,054

    Default

    My morgan was incredibly sensitive to grooming and all kinds of things and it turned out to be ulcers.

    He will always be a thin skinned chestnut, but no where near as bad as he used to be.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    Click for the ideal stocking stuffer for anyone equine!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2011
    Posts
    109

    Default

    I have a OTTB mare that was the exact same way. I started using a massage therapist who also does a lot of stretching and rehabilitation. She comes out twice weekly. Also treated her two months gastro gard. Major difference in the mare I can now use a curry comb and a brush harder than a soft brush.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,478

    Default

    Far from an expert but I see a lot of people on here mention grooming and riding sensitivity as a result of ulcers. The sensitivity is usually lower and in reaction to adding the leg, girthing, brushing the stomach, etc. However, there's never any harm in at least giving it a thought.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,944

    Default

    I have a rescue pony that if you rub too softly she objects. It tickles. So it's just a matter of rubbing fairly strongly. Is your guy off the track? We used to rub pretty firmly to loosen and warm muscles.

    Sometimes it's the rubber pulling the hair.
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    Stoystown, PA
    Posts
    1,971

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danged Arab View Post
    You might want to research magnesium deficiency. I use MagRestore with good results.
    ^^ This was my gelding and he was also treated for ulcers. He always hated his soft horsehair brush (yeah go figure). The E/Se Mag helped some, but treating him for ulcers took care of the rest. Now I can groom him all over and with his horsehair brush and he loves it. Falls asleep in the crossties.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,496

    Default

    Yes, my current OTTB and a previous one have both been super sensitive to grooming. What helped with both of them was accupressure/massage. Once they released the tension, they objected a lot less. With the mare, who was very twitchy, I also went with the flow and used a sheepskin mitt.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



Similar Threads

  1. A *sensative* subject for the ladies
    By ceciley13 in forum Dressage
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: Jul. 18, 2013, 04:30 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jun. 24, 2011, 11:34 PM
  3. Replies: 38
    Last Post: Jun. 10, 2010, 10:40 PM
  4. best fly spray for sensative skinned horses
    By HowDoILook in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: May. 10, 2010, 01:29 PM
  5. Replies: 103
    Last Post: Jan. 11, 2002, 10:48 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness