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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2002
    Location
    Vienna, VA USA
    Posts
    839

    Smile Treed Fox

    Hunter's Rest took a fabulous picture of a gray fox that the Old Dominion Hunt treed on January 3rd. I certainly didn't know that fox could climb trees, but her picture shows us that fox can indeed climb trees.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    7,007



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,442

    Default

    Yup. Greys are tree climbers.

    Really shocks the heck out of the hounds!
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
    Posts
    4,744

    Default

    can't see the link.
    i'm afraid to ask--what happened to the fox?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    A second "yup" to the fact that Grey Fox are terrific tree-climbers - almost like they're part cat.

    We've seen them several times climbing up into our peach trees to better get at the fruit.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by suz View Post
    can't see the link.
    i'm afraid to ask--what happened to the fox?
    Nothing. He was treed. The field moves on and the fox goes about his day.

    Fox 1
    Hounds 0

    Like usual.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    6 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,306

    Default

    Nice looking fox.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2003
    Location
    Flint Hill, Virginia
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    My facebook page is 'open' so please feel free to go there.
    I am so sad that Suz, and others, have this mistaken notion of foxhunting.
    It is hunting, yes, but, in reality, it's more of a little harmless fox *harassing*.
    I feel like it is a fair price to pay for a fox to provide a little gallop around his 'hood in return for AN EVER-EXPANDING GROUP OF DEVOTED LANDOWNERS AND OPEN-SPACE SUPPORTERS KEEPING HIS HABITAT OPEN AND MAINTAINED/UNMAINTAINED FOR HIM AND HIS BRETHREN AND HIS PREY.
    Note who are the BIGGEST BY FAR **conservationists***????
    Ducks Unlimited members, duck HUNTERS. Followed closely by fox HUNTERS.
    (stepping off my soapbox.)
    Gray foxes are good climbers. Related more closely to the cat family than the red fox, which is related to canine, not feline. (something to do with their claws.)
    The fox in the tree was frowning, sort of annoyed, but more bemused than anything. Part of me wanted to hide behind a tree after the others moved off and watch how he was going to extricate himself from the very slender sapling he'd selected to dash up!
    * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,442

    Default

    I'll go even further than Hunter's Rest.

    This form of hunting actually benefits this predator. When a predator becomes overly comfortable around humans, and loses its fear of humans and their dogs - that's when he's likely to start preying or hanging around too close to farms and humans.

    That sets the fox up for a human/wildlife conflict that usually ends up being lethal to the predator.

    The same problem can be seen when animals like bears become too habituated to humans; bothering campers, raiding trash cans, etc. It's not good for them.

    Hunted foxes stay wild. They remain wary of humans and their dogs. They stick to natural prey and live a natural life. They engage in natural behavior - evading a higher order predator (fox are not an apex predator - and a dog or hounds can emulate the role that apex predator plays in an ecosystem)

    The same goes for coyote - many hunts do not chase coyote but I'll tell you what - those chased coyote are far less likely to be shot than one who is hanging around your house and eyeing your dachshund.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    10 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
    Posts
    1,203

    Default

    We treed a fox a few years ago. He hung out for a little while and then did a big leap over the hounds and ran off again. We ran him for another 30 minutes before he went to ground.
    "I couldn't find my keys, so I put her in the trunk"



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,306

    Default

    I wish I had pictures from a day w/Bull Run in the late 70s or early 80s- a red fox 'went to ground' in an abandoned car and staff and hounds were swarming over the car. They'd open the trunk, fox would pop into hood, and vice versa. About the third time the hood was raised, Charles James used the back of a whipper-in as a springboard and jumped over the pack and took off. We watched him distance himself from the pack, they started in hot pursuit of course but it was such a hot, poor scenting day that as he ran out of the little stand of woods and across a pasture, hounds had nothing to follow.

    As a preface to the above, we were actually paused and relaxed to let the hounds get some water from a pond (as I mentioned, it was a hot day) before proceeding to draw the next covert. We were of course 'at ease' and coffeehousing/flasking, and Warren Harrover, late MFH/huntsman, looked behind us and saw the fox and uttered his famous 'tally-ho, gxx dxxx it!' The abandoned car in question was only about a half-mile away, and like all foxes, this one was no dummy, knowing just exactly how good or bad scent was.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    In case no one here knows it, a red fox will also climb a tree, but only under a few limited circumstances.

    Where a gray has amazing abilities to climb; I have seen them 20 ft. off the ground in a very slick poplar tree, a very difficult climb, a red has to have a few things going for him.

    A leaning pine.

    A leaning tree propped against another tree.

    A tree with lots of limbs close to the ground.

    And most surprising of all, a hollow tree.

    I have seen one red looking out of a big hole 12 or 15 ft. above the ground, in a hollow tree.

    I have seen one lying on a limb high above the ground where the hole was above the limb, also a hollow tree.

    Apparently the hollow tree allows the fox to use his feet in a manner not available to him otherwise.

    All of this over 71 years of foxhunting, so it is not very common.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2007
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    842

    Default

    Could someone post a link that works to the picture? I'd love to see it


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
    Posts
    4,744

    Default

    hey don't be sad on my account! we have a drag hunt here and i've actually ridden with them (if you can call holding on for dear life at 100 mph while peeing my pants riding).
    however i assumed most hunts actually do hunt their quarry,as i know some hunts out west hunt coyote and i believe those animals are killed.
    thank you for your explanation, i rather like fox when they are not stealing my pets.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,684

    Default

    I'm most fascinated that the huntsman has a unique "tune" to blow for "fox in a tree" as opposed to gone to ground.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2003
    Location
    Flint Hill, Virginia
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    Most hunts absolutely positively (in the US) do NOT kill their quarry with any regularity. Not even remotely.
    Yes, occasionally the quarry is killed. But I've hunted four decades east-south-north-west, all of them give the game a fair chance and it is only through *hunting* that they are accounted for.
    Regardless, we all "actually do hunt" in every sense of the word!
    But a sly stealthy woodland creature in his own 'hood outfoxing a bumbling band of slobbering foxhounds?
    That's easy!
    Ditto a crafty coyote.
    To say "... those animals are killed" is simply incorrect.
    *Sometimes*, of course.
    * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,441

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MaybeMorgan View Post
    Could someone post a link that works to the picture? I'd love to see it
    Yes please!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2003
    Location
    Flint Hill, Virginia
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter's Rest View Post
    I still get "This content is currently unavailable".


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2003
    Location
    Flint Hill, Virginia
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    Just be my 'friend' on Fb and that should let you in.
    It comes up for me when I click the link!
    * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.



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