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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,094

    Default anyone ? able to endorse a companion kept 'alone'?

    I should probably search my own threads, as I'm sure I've asked something similar in the past...and of COURSE I know the BEST answer is 'no'.

    But my situation of needing a companion 'sometimes' on the property is getting closer. I am trying to finalize little farmette bit by bit...and while that has been good to have the time to do so, I now do want 'extended' visits for our boy, but know he's so worried and unhappy there 'alone'.

    I don't want two of anything. Property won't sustain two 'companions'.

    All I'm asking here is: has anyone here ever kept a goat, mini, mini donk, etc, etc... 'alone' somewhere that critter did well, seemed content, and had no issues with that set up? Again: I understand the perfect / general answer is no...get at least two....I just wanted to hear from anyone? who had an experience with one being content and happy....

    TIA!
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2011
    Posts
    856

    Default

    Yep, I have good luck with a goat (a female).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    thanks, Happymom!!!!

    (actually I really (!!) wish I could just locate a fellow horse/pony/mini owner in the area and 'rent a companion' (!) for the trips. ) sigh.
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,066

    Default

    we have three minis... the three equal one horse in food and manure but can cause an exponential amount of trouble as they can get under/through into many horse safe areas. The little 24 inch thing gets under the three rail fencing into some of the correls by what appears to be some form of crawling


    Unless you do their feet yourself; your farrier many not be happy



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2006
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    1,416

    Default

    Years ago I did have a goat at home with no other farm animals. Because she was alone I spent a lot of time with her. Took her for walks, groomed her and sat outside with her.

    I wouldn't do it again. Herd animals may acclimate to being alone but it's really not the best for them.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,094

    Default

    Both my horses seem quite content left alone for a week (or longer) at a time. Eating, napping, etc...
    Goats (or burros!!) can get quite loud so if you have neighbours close by you might want to take that into consideration.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2004
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    1,028

    Default

    I have a horse, donkey, and a herd of goats. I think the minimum you would need is two goats to keep your horse company (and each other when he's not there). I know that my horse is fine with the donkey as her companion, the goat is fine with the donkey as a companion, and the donkey prefers the horse but is fine with the goat. Can't have the donkey alone, can't have the goat alone, can't have the horse alone. The donkey eats about the same as the goats and is a standard size. The one problem with the donkey over the goats is they are harder to get rid of, and the cheap/free ones are usually jacks. Which works well for an aged QH mare, but wouldn't work with a gelding or younger mare...



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    well...as I mentioned...I knew the real answer wasn't keep one of 'anything' alone. I probably won't even try---but did want anyone's interjections of:' hey, I've done so, and this worked very well' incase one critter was better suited to that if need be.

    just a unique situation right now, and probably not solveable as is.
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    13,897

    Default

    They do need companions - a short while is ok, but eventually they start exhibiting signs. I've sold my second horse, and am looking for a companion for my saddle horse - she needs someone and I am a great believer in hair to hair contact, too. Not just penned up in concentration camps for horses, which some owners expect.

    Their own kind is best, rather than second best which is goats, etc. There is a neighbour here who goes to the auction and gets lots of different animals, all in the same field, but they break off into groups of their own kind - llamas, goats, sheep, calves, donkeys/mule, etc. They all get along ok, then it is time to send some off to auction again.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,232

    Default

    on the idea of renting a companion-- if you have the fencing and water already set up, have you thought about renting out your pasture to someone until you're ready to move in full time (with condition that your horse will be joining them every now and then)? Then you would have residents already there. But no matter what you do, I'm not sure that infrequent companions of any species would bond very much--every visit is likely to be New Horse Drama!! the entire time you're there. (depends on how long the visits are, of course). Not being alone isn't the same as calm and relaxed, which was the original point.
    Tough problem-- sorry not to have one of those "It Worked! For Me!" examples.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Posts
    2,535

    Default

    Usually, I find that most horses adapt just fine to being alone, and if anything pay more attention to the human counterpart when alone. I actually have seen more problems when someone tried to get a companion for their horse, and the horse became too tied to the companion!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,345

    Default

    My older mare never gave a poo about being alone on a property. But she's very independent. I think it just depends on the critter. My OTHER mare would've crawled her way into a mental hospital if left alone. I think it just depends on the critter.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    4,916

    Default

    My entire childhood we only had my horse and he was always happy, friendly, and always ready to go for a ride. So were the two solo ponies that we had before him. I've never known it to be much of a problem.



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