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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
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    Question Armchair vets - mystery swelling

    My TB has had swelling on the outside right hind from just above the fetlock to a few inches below the hock. He has had this for years, but I'm not sure just how many. Two vets have checked it out...one was doing a PPE for a potential buyer, and he poked/prodded and was not worried about it at all. His opinion was that it is scar tissue built up from an old injury. (Horse is 8, was on the track but never raced due to a bowed tendon in front) He has not been lame and it has never had heat in it. Second vet is a friend who did a feel on all four legs to see if we could find the old bow (barely felt it). Agreed that the right hind was more than likely scar tissue, and not something to be concerned about.

    A few days ago, the big idiot was in the pasture, and started raising hell with the mare in the adjoining corral, and kicked the panel a few good times. Next day, the right hind is PUFFY. No heat, no lameness, but a bit sensitive to the poking/prodding. Trainer thinks that's how he got the scar tissue in the first place. She has seen injuries/swelling similar to his on race horses who were deemed "stall kickers", and given his other antic when he's bored (head bobbing, head weaving) it wouldn't shock me.

    Here we are, three days later, and while the swelling has diminished, it is still obviously more swollen. We have put him on the Game Ready twice, and the two times I've ridden him he has been wrapped. It looked a little better today after using polos. Trainer wants to try sweating it out if it is still swollen on Tuesday (supposed to rain tomorrow and Monday and he's in an outdoor corral, no stall room).

    Has anyone dealt with anything like this? He has actually never felt better under saddle, but DAMN that leg is ugly!! Just wondering what direction to take, preferably without having to call the vet.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
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    midwest
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    I would use a sweat wrap on that leg- 12 hours on, 12 hours off, for 4 or 5 days. Then you could decide if an ultrasound is needed to find the actual problem. Good luck!



  3. #3
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    Thanks! It seemed to have went down a bit thankfully. We highly doubt we'll get his leg to look normal since (what we assume to be) the scar tissue has been there for so long, but we'll give it the college try!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
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    For what it is worth I'll toss this out. About 14 years ago I had a fabulous TB mare. She was young, 8, but high mileage- she was started on the track but too slow. She then was put on a polo string but was too slow to be competitive so they used her to teach polo on. Her LR would swell up between the fetlock and the hock for no apparent reason- she had no bows or ligament injuries on any legs. I did various boots while riding, wraps while not being ridden, liniments and so on but I could not keep the swelling from returning. It wasn't a *big* deal because she was never lame on it. Anyway, one of my crunchy granola, Arab riding friends told me I should have her chiro-vet adjust my mare to see if it would help. I was.skeptical to say the least but I decided "why not" so off we went. Do you know after that one adjustment to the day that mare died 3 years later that leg never swelled up again. It was very cool and I did a lot with that mare- CTR's, LD's and fox hunting. That experience sold me on the value of a good chiro-vet.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    11,331

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    Another thought is that if there was an old injury there that had swelling, the veins may be a little stretched out and scarred and thus more prone to pooling blood. A mare I had got a pretty bad injury at one point. Lots of swelling immediately after the trauma. Years later, she would still get stocked up just in that leg though there was no lameness or new injury.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  6. #6
    Join Date
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    SLW, I am a huge fan of chiro work, and she is actually going to work on him tomorrow. It has been a long time since he was adjusted, and I know he's got some kinks. I honestly didn't think about her being able to do anything with that leg, so I will definitely ask!!

    BuddyRoo, that's the feeling my trainer has as well. He has only stocked up (both legs) a couple times before I got him (I know and trust his prev owner) and that was when he couldn't get turned out. Our thought are that since he is only puffy on that one spot, again, from trying to break down the corral, that he is holding fluid due to that being an old injury.

    I wasn't able to get out there today, but must not have been any different or my trainer would have texted me. We shall see tomorrow! If it's still puffy, I'll take pic.

    Thank you!



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