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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2012
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    51

    Default Hay Net Used Too Often and Hung Too High???

    I have a small-hole hay net I use periodically.....but found out my boarding stable has started using it full-time when feeding my horse...and it is being hung high..above her head so that she has to stretch up to eat. She is fed all her meals this way. I know little about this kind of thing but doesn't seem natural to me.

    I was told the hay nets are being used to slow down fast eaters, like my horse. Seems a few others have this set up too.

    The BM won't allow the nets hung lower due to safety concerns. So..I'm thinking of just telling them to ditch the net and just let my horse eat fast off the ground like she has with no issues for the past ten years (excuse the sarcasm).

    Thoughts? Should I be concerned or just let it go. I don't want to complain because it is a great barn otherwise.



  2. #2

    Default

    If you can get your BM to allow your horse to eat off the ground in a natural position, that would be best. When horses do this their lower jaw slides back and the create more salivia. When they eat above the ground their lower jaw does not slide back thus creating 3/4 less salivia. More salivia = less chance for ulcers since salivia nutrlizes the acid in their stomach.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
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    4,018

    Default

    This is a situation where there are good reasons for everyone's positions -- yes, it is best for horses to eat off the ground, but it is also best for horses to always have forage in front of them (and if your horse is a fast eater, that implies she inhales the hay and then goes some time with no food to nibble). And it is true that you don't want a horse tangled in a hay net and also that you don't want the hay high up.

    So how else can you accomplish all the above objectives? First of all, if it is a small hole hay net she can't get a hoof stuck in there. Is your horse shod? Does she wear a blanket? If no, then I'd argue that lowering the bag would be safe. I do think that the barn is right to insist on some slowing mechanism, or they will waste a lot of hay (or your horse will not have enough to continually nibble).

    If your horse wears blankets then how about asking if you can install a hay rack in the stall? One that is lower than the current hay bag. Perhaps you can make one if a concern is that your horse will get too fat (make it harder to eat). (Otherwise, I've found that standard hay racks keep they hay from being wasted by getting strewn everywhere and pooped/peed on).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
    Location
    Zone IV/Area III
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    Default

    Is there any way to add extra safety features so that it can be hung lower? I know FF added the clips on both corners so that if a hoof gets put over, the net should break at the clip, saving the horse and the net.

    My horse has shoes...and his net is pretty darn low.

    http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h2...6at95007AM.png



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    Default

    Reay that's exactly how some of my hay bags are hung. I tie baling twine to the rails, and then use a double-sided clip to connect the bag to the baling twine.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,538

    Default

    for those that say hay nets hung low are safe - how do you put the hay in? there must be a huge "opening" for hay and that opening is just the place a horse will stick its foot.

    would i use one? it depends on the horse... if i had a horse that would calmly deal with the possibility of a foot being stuck - they sure, but if i had a horse that would freak then no.

    there *are* other types of feeders that slow horses down and that are safer....



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
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    Zone IV/Area III
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SMF11 View Post
    Reay that's exactly how some of my hay bags are hung. I tie baling twine to the rails, and then use a double-sided clip to connect the bag to the baling twine.
    id rather be safe than sorry



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,751

    Default

    I use a lot of Nibble Nets. They are hung so the top is at about wither height. So far, so good. I have one idiot mare who, if she were going to get stuck in it, she would have done it already (she routinely puts her feet in her feed bucket...did I mention she's an idiot?). I would ask them to lower it or consider a Freedom Feeder like reay posted (which, btw, the more I look at the more I like), Nibble Net, or some other easy to use, easy to hang, safe slow feeder.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
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    Zone IV/Area III
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mbm View Post
    for those that say hay nets hung low are safe - how do you put the hay in? there must be a huge "opening" for hay and that opening is just the place a horse will stick its foot.

    would i use one? it depends on the horse... if i had a horse that would calmly deal with the possibility of a foot being stuck - they sure, but if i had a horse that would freak then no.

    there *are* other types of feeders that slow horses down and that are safer....
    The FF has a large envelope like opening at the top, that is kept closed by 2-3 clips. I clip it very far over (usually towards the back) to seal it completely shut after hay is inserted, for 2 reasons:

    1) keeps horse from cheating and putting head in the top of the net
    2) keeps extremeties from getting stuck in there



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    One of mine has had some neck problems and my vet recommends he not be fed other than off the ground, so that's how we do it for him. At shows I do use nets to keep the stall neater but I hang it so it's about lower chest height.

    At home I use small hole nets to keep the horses from inhaling their hay, and I hang them at upper chest height. Even when empty the nets don't hang down far enough for any but the most creative horse to get tangled, and I use a breakaway tie so it would just pop off if something got tangled like a blanket clip or something.

    I've had a net come down once or twice (the brass snap broke on both occasions) and it just laid there on the ground in spite of being trampled and thrown around as the horses finished eating.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    4,924

    Default

    I hang mine about chest height or so, using the small hole nets. All my horses wear shoes in front but I haven't been concerned about the nets getting caught as they are higher than pawing level and the holes are quite small. I tie up the closing rope in such a way that there are no big loops. I have one horse that regularly gets his net down unless you hang it "just so" and it gets dirty and trampled but not caught on him.

    I was really paranoid about using the nets at first, but got started when I needed to slow down my IR horse, and it made it easier to do the weighing and soaking of his meals. Now I'm careful but not too worried. I don't like them hung high, however and would rather go net less than have them high.



  12. #12
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mbm View Post
    for those that say hay nets hung low are safe - how do you put the hay in? there must be a huge "opening" for hay and that opening is just the place a horse will stick its foot.
    The cinchchix nets I use pull the opening closed so that it is tiny -- definitely too small for a hoof.

    Here's a picture of one of my hay nets:
    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...type=1&theater

    (baling twine, which will break, connects the bag to the eye bolt in the wall)



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2012
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Great ideas everyone. Thank you for sharing the links and photos! So helpful...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2011
    Location
    ENC
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    Default

    Occasionally if my horse is in the inner stalls of our barn, say waiting on the farrier or vet, (stalls are double, one opening inside the barn, the other off the back of the stall opens to the pasture), they have hay racks up high in the stall, and then a wooden feed box trough thing. My horse likes to take a bit of hay from the rack, then put it in the box and eat it, and repeat. The little low box is great.
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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2009
    Posts
    748

    Default

    I make hay "pillows". I take the string out of the loops which close the net, and then use a large locking (threaded) carabiner type qick link instead of the original string. You end up with a hay pillow that cannot catch a hoof. The horse eats from ground level, which is better for them.
    I would not use it with shod horses, of course...I would not suggest using hinged type metal closure that cannot be threaded shut: a horse could catch a lip on it and rip themselves up.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,209

    Default

    What yellowbritches said. The Nibblenet people also make a small holed ground feeder--easy for them to stuff and toss on the stall floor if that it what you prefer.

    http://thinaircanvas.com/nibblenet/p...ound-frame.htm
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  17. #17
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    Jan. 19, 2011
    Location
    Coastal Marsh of Texas
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    1,086

    Default

    Why don't you try half up in a net and half down in flakes on the ground? Then everybody's happy.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
    Posts
    2,384

    Default

    I put my small hole hay nets on the ground with them tied in a way that a foot can't get caught. And if they do (happened once in 5 years, caught on a shoe from pawing), they walk around the stall with a hay net that is not attached to anything else (like the wall) to cause a big issue. It's been a win-win for my horse and the barn staff (easier than hanging).



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,496

    Default

    Horses are MUCH less likely to have lung/breathing problems, or develop illness from things they may be exposed to if they are fed their hay on the ground.

    I have boarded and owned many horses over the years that can't have unlimited hay. Many eat their night supply in about 15 minutes. Not a single ulcer problem.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2012
    Posts
    282

    Default

    I hang mine so it's sitting on the floor (I have the FF), and never had an issue with my gelding. He doesn't have top teeth in front, so I actually leave the top open for him, he's messy if his hay ISN'T in a bag. The gelding next to him used to work it through a crack in the wall, and he never got caught either. Not to say it couldn't happen, but it seems with small-hole hay nets it doesn't happen very often. I guess it just depends on if your horse is an idiot or not



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