The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 37 of 37
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,247

    Default

    I've got the coated wire like SLW - on 6" round posts set 12' apart.
    3 lines of wire set below a top rail that is a 4" wide 2-wire "plank".
    Top line of wire can carry a charge, but you could also use that lower to keep the dogs out.
    It is now 8yo and the middle line of wire - the one the horses poke through to graze on the "greener grass" could use some retensioning, but still looks fine, not saggy.

    I also like the looks of the electrobraid and would probably use that if I did any more fencing.

    My fences were done professionally, but I have friends who did the electrobraid themselves and it looks good.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,667

    Default

    As much as I'd love an entirely wood fence, as Calvin said, the cost would be astronomical!

    Glad to hear that "field fence" and 2x4 welded wire haven't killed anyone's horses -ours don't really bother the fence much as long as the top strand is a hotwire. The COTH safe-fencing police would likely have a conniption fit if they saw what we have currently, redneck fencing at it's best.

    Dog containment would be a luxury - but isn't absolutely necessary. As I said, they are supervised anyway and don't wander - front half of the property isn't fenced at all.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Location
    Silvana, WA
    Posts
    926

    Default

    Heinz - we've got the coated wire like SLW and 2Dogs for our perimeter fence and 1/2" tape for our cross-fencing. We used the Gallagher Equifence with wood corner posts and capped t-posts for the runs (set 20' apart). We did it ourselves 4 years ago and it still looks new. We have 3 lines set at 48", 36", 24"- the top line is white for visibility and the other 2 are black. All of our strands are hot. The dimensions are roughly 500'x220' square, with one of the short sides no-climb instead (see below).

    Our dogs are both big and the 24" strand mostly keeps them either in or out. If we were really concerned about it I'd add another strand at 12" and as long as it was hot I think that would contain them.

    We did 4' 2"x4" no-climb for the backyard for the dogs - shared fenceline with part of the pasture. I ran a strand of the hot coated wire along the top to keep the horses from leaning on it. There's also a short run of no-climb on the shared fence between the sacrifice paddock and chicken yard and that SHOULD have had a hot strand at the bottom as well to keep the horses from stepping on the wire to get the grass. That 60' run needs to be completely replaced/redone at some time from being stepped on and used for scratching.

    So, I guess, while the no-climb is a "prettier" fence I find the coated wire to be fare more practical.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,334

    Default

    My favorite piece of fence is no-climb with the Ramm flex fence rail on top (like the centaur someone else linked to, just a different brand) but I wouldn't call it economical.

    I use horseguard in the back, which is nice because I can move it around and it's affordable. But, I'd much prefer to have it all in flex fence if I could.

    The other factor which will change the economics quite a bit is whether it's a straight run or a bunch of corners and gates. Every corner or turn or endpoint is expensive with any kind of tensioned fence. For a really short run, pipe panels or board fence starts to look attractive just because the simplicity of installation and the lack of need for concreted and braced posts saves more than the cost of the boards.

    I personally wouldn't put field fence in for horses without an inner fence to keep them a couple feet away from it. The savings - compared to everything you're going to put in in labor and the cost of the rest of the fencing materials - is just not large compared to one simple vet visit.

    Also, there's the option of one kind of fencing for your driveway/roadside/curb appeal and a different kind for the back.

    The other advice (first heard here!) that I still deeply value was to go for a 5' fence. The taller fence keeps them from leaning on it and will thus make it lower maintenance.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  5. #25
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2008
    Posts
    285

    Default

    We (or should I say I) am leaning towards rubber fencing.

    Here is the website I have stumbled across.

    www.rubberfencing.com

    I think the 2 inch is much more visually appealing than the 1 inch.

    1in at 70 feet per "roll" is 10cents per foot ( +shipping)
    2in at 30 feet per "roll" is 20center ( +shipping)

    Really, your costs are going to come from the posts and not the fencing.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    Glad to hear that "field fence" and 2x4 welded wire haven't killed anyone's horses -ours don't really bother the fence much as long as the top strand is a hotwire.
    Just noticed this... of course horses have been gravely injured in field fence. (Horses have been gravely injured in *every* kind of fence!) You can mitigate the risk but a top strand of hotwire (which keeps horses from leaning over) isn't necessarily sufficient - the issue is feet going through it. Any scenario where horses might find themselves with a foot against the fence is of concern. Larger pasture, offset internal hotwire, those things help.

    As for the welded 2x4 mesh fence that comes on a roll - don't bother. The horses will push against it even a little and the welds will break. You'll have to replace it in no time.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,660

    Default Welded Wire Question

    I am putting 3 board along our driveway and about 200 feet of road frontage and had thought about putting 36" welded wire on the outside of the posts (boards would be on the inside/animal side of the posts and top and bottom would have electic on it too). Do you still think this would be bad? I was hoping to put a few hair-breed sheep out in the pasture to help with grazing. I intended for the electric to be the primary deterent, but the welded as a back up on the outside. Also want the welded to deter random dogs from going in the pasture (not a current issue, but you never know).

    I just *really* didn't to mess with the posts/tension necessary for a field fence on this part of the run, since I was already doing 3 board. It is also very curvy and a bit hilly there, so field fence would be difficult. I am thinking I will do a true field fence on the rest of the pasture, continuing the two strands of electric tape.

    Thoughts?
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,667

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    Just noticed this... of course horses have been gravely injured in field fence. (Horses have been gravely injured in *every* kind of fence!) You can mitigate the risk but a top strand of hotwire (which keeps horses from leaning over) isn't necessarily sufficient - the issue is feet going through it. Any scenario where horses might find themselves with a foot against the fence is of concern. Larger pasture, offset internal hotwire, those things help.

    As for the welded 2x4 mesh fence that comes on a roll - don't bother. The horses will push against it even a little and the welds will break. You'll have to replace it in no time.
    I think you took my post out of context. I was directly referring to the COTH'ers that had posted about their unapproved fencing and the lack of injuries that have resulted.

    I am not naive enough to think there is ANY type of fence ANYWHERE that no horse has ever been injured on.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,316

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    I think you took my post out of context. I was directly referring to the COTH'ers that had posted about their unapproved fencing and the lack of injuries that have resulted.

    I am not naive enough to think there is ANY type of fence ANYWHERE that no horse has ever been injured on.
    Also missed where I've had it up for four years now (in a smaller area, not a pasture) with no damage to it from naughty, grass-seeking equines.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    254

    Default

    I've posted about this before. This is my mom's fence. Love it! It isn't the cheapest, but helps if you get rough sawn lumber from an old farmer up the street (he has a little sawmill). My mom put a single strand of electric along the top, since the horses don't bother with it anyway.
    http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto...25039212_n.jpg
    Proud owner of Belle- 17.2h PerchxTB-wannabe dressage horse & Fayah 14.1H arab-trail horse extroidinaire!



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    16,261

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperAlter View Post
    We (or should I say I) am leaning towards rubber fencing.

    Here is the website I have stumbled across.

    www.rubberfencing.com

    I think the 2 inch is much more visually appealing than the 1 inch.

    1in at 70 feet per "roll" is 10cents per foot ( +shipping)
    2in at 30 feet per "roll" is 20center ( +shipping)

    Really, your costs are going to come from the posts and not the fencing.
    Wow, really? Did you see this thread? I wouldn't even consider rubber fencing based on that feedback.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,066

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    This is what we were leaning towards, but I wasn't sure how economical it would be. We'd like something functional for the horses that will appeal to a variety of horse people, but that still looks nice, since we plan to sell the place in a couple years.

    That's what we did - keeps our dogs (and horses) in and neighbor's dogs out.

    We did fencing ourselves and buying 'no climb red wire horse fence' in large 330" rolls is the most economical way - also buying poles in quantity (local logging company) is also very economical.
    Sandy in Fla.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2013
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    85

    Default

    ran across these as I'm in the same situation, but haven't used it personally- "adapter" cost may cancel out the t-post idea (as someone mentioned- may not be much more to just do 3 board), but looks like a cool idea and has a top wire mount.

    Equi-Tee

    Don't worry about your redneck fencing I'm still debating about even starting electric fencing as most of mine have never seen it, let alone cared about the fence unless they are coming to say hi when I get home.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,334

    Default

    One of the things to keep in mind is that the calculations are different based on whether you are adapting an existing fence line or putting in all new fencing. When I price it, the cost of a running element of fence is low compared to the cost of installing braced posts.

    So you can get a roll of 4' field fence for $150 or you can get 4' no-climb for $199 or 5' no-climb for $250... and at the end of the day the differences in your total are probably going to be less than $1000 over a very large bill and the result will last longer and be safer... perhaps saving you a $1k vet bill and a fencing do-over if you have an entanglement.

    Now, if you're comparing it to not buying a roll of fencing at all, then the financial considerations lean much stronger towards keeping it and adding some strands of electric inside of it.

    By the way, before considering the rubber fencing, I'd look at the flex-rail systems from Ramm that are 1" and economical, or horseguard. JMHO.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2004
    Location
    PacificNorthwest
    Posts
    270

    Default

    i vote for Ramm Flex Fence or Centour type fencing combined with 2x4 No-Climb. Use PT posts. with "field fence" and steel posts you need to add in the cost of inevidable vet bills. I live in a location where the power is agurenteed to go out so electric just does not work --



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,496

    Default

    Wire mesh with an oak board on top will be almost maintenance free for 30+ years. The rest is a never ending battle ($$) to maintain.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2010
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Vote for no-climb here. We had a company install Red-Brand mesh and love it so far. Probably debatable on the visual appeal factor, but we like it! https://mail-attachment.googleuserco...x2KnyeTEQgv0E4 and https://mail-attachment.googleuserco...WxpsU&sadssc=1



Similar Threads

  1. Fencing dilemma...what are the options?
    By Melelio in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Nov. 17, 2012, 08:40 PM
  2. Reinforcing fencing, electric and other options?
    By mg in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May. 20, 2012, 12:37 PM
  3. Favorite/most economical fencing?
    By florida foxhunter in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Jan. 13, 2010, 03:09 PM
  4. Temporary Fencing Options?
    By Romo in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Sep. 28, 2009, 09:00 PM
  5. economical and safe foal fencing?
    By okggo in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Apr. 18, 2008, 04:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •