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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Horse Heaven
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    1,899

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    I use any of the rubber/plastic groomers as long as the teeth/nubs are very soft. And they vary by brand and batch....I won't buy them if they are already old and hard.

    I have also started using a soft brush -- the skin is so thin and hair so short that the brush gets most of the dirt out. And is very soft.

    Also do most of my grooming AFTER riding, when the horse is relaxed and warm.

    On our most sensitive ever TB, it turned out that the cold also was part of the problem...Now he gets a cooler draped over the parts not being groomed. It works like magic.

    I feel for the really thin-skinned sensitive TBs out there. They really are special. Its like getting a gold star when you can find the right mix of grooming tools and temperature. Lol.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Posts
    1,788

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    I'll put in another vote for the cactus cloth. I have a version of the mitt as well as a true cactus cloth. The mitt is far less abrasive than the cloth I will say. It is not nearly as effective at dirt removal as the cloth. My always itchy Arab likes the cloth a lot better for getting his itchy spots.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Posts
    149

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    Yes, there exists a hard rubber curry that has round nubs for teeth. It has been tested and approved by more than one thin skinned sensitive TB. I really like the hard rubber curry when trying to deal with caked on mud - most of the soft curries don't do well with caked on clay.

    Unfortunately, I don't know where to tell you to find it. A local tack store has had it in stock sometimes, so I've picked up a few when I've seen them.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2004
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    3,824

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    steel curry comb. seems counter intuitive but my most delicate flowers do ok with it and it totally breaks up the dried mud.
    A man must love a thing very much if he not only practices it without any hope of fame or money, but even practices it without any hope of doing it well.--G. K. Chesterton



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2001
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    519

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    I'm partial to this one from Oster:
    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...4b25&gas=oster

    It's a but more "substantial" that some of the other fine currys that have been mentioned, yet it is soft enough that it doesn't seem to offend even the most fine-skinned horses
    *Absolut Equestrian*

    "The plural of anecdote is not fact...except in the horse industry"



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,140

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    I think someone mentioned a hay knot? Like a strapping pad, I just ordered my first strapping pad-it's pretty hard to find in the states- because my thin skinned 'turdhead' , lol, HATES the curry, any kind if curry. And I figure why tick him off when he works so hard for me? I'll see if I can fin a link. They are supposed to be great to bring the bloom and blood flow to the surface.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,140



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2000
    Location
    Goochland, VA
    Posts
    1,441

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    It's called a "hay wisp"...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,125

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    Well, the Grooma curry thing seemed to be Toby approved. I was able to rub him all over with it without risking life or limb or him collapsing on the floor in a writhing pile of goo. He wouldn't admit it, but he may have actually enjoyed it.

    Thanks for all the suggestions. If this loses its appeal in a day or two, I'll try some of these other ideas.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2008
    Posts
    1,721

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    Cactus cloth
    Shed flower if used very lightly
    This dog grooming mitt is easily my favorite, gets the job done really well but it's super flexible and not harsh at all.

    ^^^Any of the above options are acceptable to my TB, who thinks all rubber curries are an abomination unless I use it on his face or ears (who likes having the inside of their ears curried? My weirdo horse, that's who)



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,904

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    My TB chestnut mare - uber sensitive skin enjoys the Massage Jelly scrubber - http://www.bitofbritain.com/Curry_Combs_s/200.htm. Little teeth on one side good for getting up the scurf and 'bumps' on the other side good for a bit of massage. Very flexible and lasts for several years.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,125

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    Yeah. Except Toby doesn't like the jelly scrubber/curry thing. Too pointy for him.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,409

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    Cactus cloth.

    I didn't even read past the title of the thread and the Clipped... yada yada... Thin Skinned... yada yada.

    Just. Cactus Cloth.

    I say Cactus Cloth at the drop of a hat. I look around for places to say Cactus Cloth.

    But then again it's always the right answer.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2006
    Posts
    614

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    For the really sensitive horses, I don't use the curry in a circular motion like everyone is taught. I use it in strokes, like I do with the body brush and the sensitive horses like it better.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    519

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    Quote Originally Posted by fatappy View Post
    http://www.smartpakequine.com/soft-r...x?cm_vc=Search

    Very soft. but still effective to get loose hair off and add shine. Not so good for mud....
    I've tried many, many curries and these above are fabulous!!!! I can't recommend them enough. Dover sells them in different colors, the curry is very soft and gentle. I originally got it to do the face and ears of my mare but she loved it so much that I use it all over her body! Which is a little time consuming but if that's what makes her happy then so be it.

    The Epona ones can be a bit stiff/hard. I have not found anything nearly as nice as the curry listed above so would strongly suggest getting one of them



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2001
    Location
    The Great White North, where we get taxed out the wazoo
    Posts
    638

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    I have one of those types and ordered myself a Cactus Cloth, after reading a thread here about them.
    My guy loves it, even the tickly belly places. The face rub after his bridle comes off is morphing into A Religious Experience for him with it.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,140

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    How long do these cactus cloths last?



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,961

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    Either the jelly scrubby mitt thing, or one of those grooming blocks. Seriously glad I discovered them pre-mud season, I always felt so bad torturing my poor horse trying to get the dried mud off with curries and scrapers while he twitched and danced around, and with that block, it just scrapes away while he snoozes.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  19. #39
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HorseKrazy View Post
    How long do these cactus cloths last?
    They are extrememely long lasting, you have to take care of them like they recommend though or they can tend to get hard. Regular old burlap bag works well too if the CC is too tough on them. I second the Oster curry though, although my favorite on the thin skinned ones was just a regular rubber grooming mitt.

    http://www.equestriancollections.com...0524&source=CJ
    Last edited by Calamber; Jan. 5, 2013 at 09:24 PM. Reason: found link to product
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2001
    Location
    The Great White North, where we get taxed out the wazoo
    Posts
    638

    Default

    There was a poster here who had a Cactus Cloth going on 15 years. They are around $8 and so far well worth it. You soak it in water and wring out then let dry and away you go. I shake it out to clean it altho in warmer weather you use it to bath with rather than wash it. There was a thread a month or so back...



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