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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2006
    Location
    Berryville, VA
    Posts
    2,719

    Lightbulb Just Because He Is Fat, Doesn't = Good Dental Care ***Pics Added***

    I've been going with Sean on farm calls lately because I've taken some time off work to enjoy the holidays. Of course, he NEVER takes time off, so if I want to see him, I have to go on farm calls. Lol

    Anyway, I can't tell you how many owners I've heard say over the past few weeks "oh, he doesn't need his teeth floated, he's fat as a tick". WELL, let me tell you that means NOTHING! We were at a big barn recently and Sean was making his way through the herd saying this one needs done, this one can wait, this one needs done, etc. He came to a big gelding that did not want his mouth touched. The BO said "oh, he's fine, he's such an easy keeper, don't worry about him". Sean was about to turn him loose and thought better of it because of how the horse was acting. After a few seconds, Sean slid his hand in the mouth and his hand came out bloody. It was Sean's blood from cutting himself on a tooth! Now this happens on a semi-regular basis, so not a huge deal. It did, however, make him want to give the horse a better exam. Well, the poor horse had lacerations on his tongue and all thoughout his mouth. Some were old, some were healing, some were pretty darn fresh. Sean showed the BO what was going on in the mouth and she was amazed how good the horse looked because his mouth was so horrible...one of the worst Sean said he had seen in months. The horse was a riding horse, but everyone said he rode great - no head-tossing, no getting heavy, no indication there was a huge problem. The poor thing had been suffering for who-knows-how-long because he looked "good" so no one thought there was a problem and he was very stoic about his pain.

    So anyway, this is a friendly reminder that horses under the age of 6 and over the age of 15 should be CHECKED (doesn't mean they need to be floated, but at least looked at) and horses 6 to 14 should be checked yearly unless there is a known problem.

    Also, have the dentist SHOW YOU what is going on. Let him open up the horse's mouth and you look in with a head-lamp so you can SEE before and after (of course have him/her explain what you are looking at). Don't just let someone just say they did a good job and be on their merry way. Some dentists do a fantastic job up-front where the horse is "checked" and then don't touch the rear teeth. Be your horse's advocate! If you don't know something, ASK. If they are providing quality work, it should not be a problem from them to explain in detail what is going on in the horse's mouth and what they are doing about it.

    OK, I'm getting off my soap-box. I was lucky enough to have two fantastic EqDT's that worked on my horses prior to Sean. After seeing some of the work that is performed out there, I feel very fortunate to have found them. Like many owners, I didn't know the difference between a quality job and a so-so job, but now that I know what to look for, I was very lucky they practiced in the area.
    Boarding for Show, Pleasure, and Retirement horses. www.LockeMeadows.com


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada and South Australia
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Well said! Love hanging out with our dentist. Generally learn something and always good fun to talk too and the easiest job ever to do aka I do nothing and just stand there! lol

    P.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    3,918

    Default

    This is certainly true at my farm: the two equines with the worst mouths are the fattest! (Our large pony, and the 33 year old donkey, both of whom did not get good dental care for a lot of their lives).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2006
    Location
    Berryville, VA
    Posts
    2,719

    Default

    Well, Sean finally worked on the guy I picked up at the auction on January 1st. He is a CLASSIC example of a horse in good weight, that has no issues under saddle, but has a HORRIBLE mouth. Here is a link to today's float. Sean worked over an hour getting his mouth where it needs to be. Honestly, neither of us guessed it was going to be this bad. Figured a routine float. Not so much.

    http://www.facebook.com/LockeMeadows...type=1&theater



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
    Location
    NYC=center of the universe
    Posts
    1,869

    Default

    Good reminder.

    My mare was becoming less willing to collect all of a sudden. It was her teeth bothering her.

    I love my equine dentist. He shows me everything and has me practically put my whole arm down my horses' throats!

    My poor mare looked like she thought she was dying and she just couldn't fight it with the sedation.

    My gelding? Let's just say he's a fighter, and no sedative will change that!
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    Berlin, CT
    Posts
    3,997

    Default

    Drives me crazy, the farm owner where I board at is that way. I've asked in the past when I was scheduling the dentist if they would like their 4 checked and they always tell me no. They look fine and they don't see them dropping wads of hay yadda yadda yadda... Wish I could get them to at least have them checked! Oh well.
    "You are under arrest for operating your mouth under the influence of
    ignorance!" Officer Beck



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    2,836

    Default

    OP, thanks for this, your poor guy, so thankful that he finally has someone who loves him that has a clue!
    "I have brought on the hatred of Wall Street and I relish it".
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2012
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    462

    Default

    *sigh* Had a border who knew everything.... things like horses only really need their feet trimmed once or twice a year. Even though she professed to know everything she had no idea what floating even was, sometime's people just need educated. Although, even then you get that one that look at you bug eyed and tells you how cruel and horrible that sounds and refuses to have their horses teeth even checked.... *face desk*

    on a happier note I took one of the 9yr old girls that takes occasional lessons with me to the vet to see the horses get their teeth done and she was highly amused but totally would not feel their teeth! in her words "that would be totally weird and scary!"



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