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  1. #101
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneGrayPony View Post

    But here are your options:

    1) Learn to ride said beast.

    2) Sell him and move on.

    Those of us who are saying maybe #1 is an option are saying that we've had enough equine experience to know that a solid sane temperament, with a heart of gold, is really really worth so much more than a horse who is 3" too tall is an inconvenience.
    I do not think anyone should be made to ride a horse they do not want to, so I vote #2.

    That aside, another reason to vote #1 is what many have said all along, him having lofty forward way of going does not have anything to do with his height, it has everything to do with him be athletic. There are tiny little critters who feel the same way when they move.



  2. #102
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    Dec. 2, 2009
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    Yes, trub, and great big tall ones that ride like they are 12.2.

    Should someone ride a horse they don't want to or stretches them out of their comfort zone? Only if they want to get good, and judging by this poster's other comments, she's not trail riding, she's competing.

    Of course I did forget that any more it's not about getting good, it's about being successful showing.

    Another thought is that sometimes when a horse is so radically different in stride length or slab sided vs not or what have you, the discomfort is what may tell you that you need to do things differently. Perhaps you've been relying on strength to help them keep their balance and you need to learn how to help the horse help themselves, and keep you less in the picture.

    I just went from a slab sided horse to a horse that is as round as...well lets just say even dropping my stirrups 4 holes puts my leg at a 90 degree angle and puts me in a bit of a chair seat. The problem is not that he's the wrong horse for me, the problem is that my hips are too tight. I guess I could sell him because of it, but I'm not likely to, I'm more inclined to believe that I'm the one who needs some modification.



  3. #103
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    Dec. 21, 2008
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    Missouri
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    2,190

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    Quote Originally Posted by ponyrider212 View Post
    Haha, basically, yes. I don't mind that he got big in and of itself, but that my trainer lied to me about how tall he'd get, and sold me a horse that she knew would grow a hand taller than what I wanted. I thought I was buying a horse that was the size I wanted.
    You NEVER know how tall they will get. I had full siblings one was 16.2 the other was 17.2. You took a gamble in buying a horse that is still growing and it didn't turn out like you planned. Sell him or trade him or learn to ride him, but I don't believe you have the right to blame or sue anyone for a choice you ultimately made of your own fee will. The only way to get the size you want is to buy one that is 100% done growing.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #104
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    May. 3, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneGrayPony View Post
    Yes, trub, and great big tall ones that ride like they are 12.2.

    Should someone ride a horse they don't want to or stretches them out of their comfort zone? Only if they want to get good, and judging by this poster's other comments, she's not trail riding, she's competing.

    Of course I did forget that any more it's not about getting good, it's about being successful showing.

    Another thought is that sometimes when a horse is so radically different in stride length or slab sided vs not or what have you, the discomfort is what may tell you that you need to do things differently. Perhaps you've been relying on strength to help them keep their balance and you need to learn how to help the horse help themselves, and keep you less in the picture.

    I just went from a slab sided horse to a horse that is as round as...well lets just say even dropping my stirrups 4 holes puts my leg at a 90 degree angle and puts me in a bit of a chair seat. The problem is not that he's the wrong horse for me, the problem is that my hips are too tight. I guess I could sell him because of it, but I'm not likely to, I'm more inclined to believe that I'm the one who needs some modification.
    Actually, and I'm not trying to be snarky here at all, truly, but you can do serious damage to your body/hip joints/knee joints that you will really regret later in life (think hip replacement level regret) if your new horse is that much too wide for you and your body has to stretch beyond what it should be stretching. So it's not just a matter of sucking it up. Don't be a martyr.

    ETA-Maybe it's a dressage thing, but most dressage riders I know take horse size and how it fits their body into account when buying a horse. They don't consider learning how to ride an 18 hand horse to be any sort of learning experience or badge of honor. When they buy size appropriate mounts to train up the levels, I don't consider that evidence of them being all about winning, taking short cuts and not caring about learning any more than I can consider riding in an ill fitting saddle to be a valuable experience.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #105
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    Dec. 2, 2009
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    I am later in life, and the damage was done when I ran too far into my pregnancy, hence the tightness :-) I'll probably need all sorts of joints replaced when I'm even older - trust me, if I were a horse you'd say "dear god don't ride that thing!" However, it's good for me to stretch them, just as it's good for me to stretch my hamstrings which are ridiculously tight and don't help my back issues.

    Ahh the joys of being conformationally challenged.

    Incidentally, I have a really long thigh and short calf so I prefer the feel of the rotund ones, and they spin out from underneath me and my stupidly long torso less easily :-) So what's a gal to do?

    Anyway - thank you for the observation, I didn't take it snarkily at all!



  6. #106
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    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    The OP said her horse was taller and longer strided than her comfort zone. She didn't say he was so wide her hips were popping out.

    Seriously... she owns a horse that is stretching her limits of psychological comfort and perhaps riding ability. She can either sell him and downsize, or learn to stretch her boundaries. Her choice. But she has no recourse on the trainer who talked her into it before he got that way.



  7. #107
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    And I will just point out that the concept of suing the trainer is just ridiculous here. What are her damages, exactly? She bought a yearling that is now trained and going very well with an amateur, and has therefore nearly certainly increased in value. But she wants to sue for the purchase price? And what? Keep the horse as well? Or just kill the horse after she gets her purchase price back from the trainer? The whole thing is so absurd I can't stop thinking about it!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #108
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    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    You were ignorant and too trusting and bought the wrong horse. Shame on you that you didn't educate yourself about what happens to long yearlings (they continue to grow up). Shame on the trainer for taking advantage of your ignorance. OK there we've laid blame.

    Just sell him. I lost every ounce of respect for you when you voiced that your stupidity resulted in your fantasy about chopping his head off. What an absolutely horrible thing to consider about a horse whose only sin is being too tall.

    We can cross you off the list of 'horsemen'. You're just a short chick with a fat wallet and a bucketful of misdirected self-pity and no horse sense.

    Shame on you, woman.


    23 members found this post helpful.

  9. #109
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    Jun. 7, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCRider View Post
    Actually, and I'm not trying to be snarky here at all, truly, but you can do serious damage to your body/hip joints/knee joints that you will really regret later in life (think hip replacement level regret) if your new horse is that much too wide for you and your body has to stretch beyond what it should be stretching. So it's not just a matter of sucking it up. Don't be a martyr.

    ETA-Maybe it's a dressage thing, but most dressage riders I know take horse size and how it fits their body into account when buying a horse. They don't consider learning how to ride an 18 hand horse to be any sort of learning experience or badge of honor. When they buy size appropriate mounts to train up the levels, I don't consider that evidence of them being all about winning, taking short cuts and not caring about learning any more than I can consider riding in an ill fitting saddle to be a valuable experience.
    I see your whole post and say simply "Debbie McDonald and Brentina."
    Somebody tell her hips they need to be replaced.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #110
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    New York, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    I see your whole post and say simply "Debbie McDonald and Brentina."
    Somebody tell her hips they need to be replaced.
    Margie Engle and... Indigo, Land of Kings, Saluut II...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #111
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    WWJJS?

    What would Judge Judy say?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #112
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    Feb. 22, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    Well, I would love to, but I don't own this horse. I lease her. I won't buy horses anymore because of family financial obligations. I'm old (50) and my equitation days are 30 years behind me. I'm weird, but I still want to learn things in my old age. While shopping for a new lease horse, I came up with a 17hh OTTB and this little Trakh mare. Big OTTBs are my thing, totally in my comfort zone, all I've ever ridden and we see eye to eye. In my old age, I decided I needed a challenge . I've got to say this mare is very nice and definitely a challenge (I've always had geldings too ). Eeek! She's giving me a workout, that's for sure, and some humility!
    Omg -don't make 50 sound so old! I still do endurance riding at 48 and I'm thinking about getting a young Arab to bring along.


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  13. #113
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    Jun. 7, 2004
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    Pittsburgh,Pennsylvaina
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    Kinda makes me seem foolish that I want a pony My girl is 13 and 15.1hh.



  14. #114
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    May. 3, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffany01 View Post
    Kinda makes me seem foolish that I want a pony My girl is 13 and 15.1hh.
    1-Debbie MacDonald is a professional dressage rider who had an Olympic caliber large horse, not an adult amateur with one horse. The option of trading in Brentina for an equivalent smaller model didn't exist. Even DM took horse size into account when shopping. From Flying Changes article "Sometimes Debbie might look at a horse and think it's too big for her, but then Bob might point out that it has a narrow build, or a certain flexibility, and she'll try it. "I can tell usually in one ride if it will work," she says."

    2-DM may have conformation that made riding a large horse possible even though she herself was short.

    3-AFAIK Margie Engle isn't a dressage rider.



  15. #115
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    New York, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCRider View Post
    3-AFAIK Margie Engle isn't a dressage rider.
    I don't think the OP is a dressage rider either, so I don't see how your example is relevant. My point was that I'm a little skeptical of the claim that riding a big horse means hip/joint replacement down the road. That just sounds ridiculous.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #116
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    Aug. 7, 2005
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    Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabby.gator View Post
    I'm reading this as she's mostly disappointed in the fact that she got hosed by trainer, which is making her angry, and her anger is projected at the horse, who is the reason she got hosed. and the fact that he's bigger than she's comfortable with.

    .
    To be angry with the horse or to dislike him because of it isn't very fair or reasonable. Poor horse. He sounds like a honey,
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  17. #117
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    Feb. 4, 2004
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    If he's not the right horse for you, or you aren't comfortable, you should sell. Life is too short to spend with the wrong horse.

    I don't think it's worth getting upset about the possible conspiracy theory. It would suck if your trainer intentionally tricked you into buying an unsuitable horse so she could sell him on your behalf, but none of you--breeder, ex-trainer, you--knew how much he would grow. And it's hard to imagine that the breeder would remember a 4 yo conversation word for word.

    Besides, since you've left your trainer, she cannot collect if you sell him, and you're now left with what sounds like a very nice and valuable horse. Sell him if he's not the one for you, and enjoy the commission-you-don't-have-to-pay-her.



  18. #118
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    Dec. 20, 2011
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    Seattle
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    I feel as though it's a little over board to tell the OP she should be ashamed of herself. A lot of people are blowing what she said way out of proportion.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #119
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    Apr. 10, 2006
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    It was years ago. What exactly do you want to do about it? It sounds like you've got a really nice horse, and I'm sure he'd be easy to sell.

    I recently found out a mare I have now had a relatively serious injury prior to me taking her on last spring. It was not disclosed. Maybe the previous owner knew, maybe she didn't. She may never be sound for even light work. She is 7. I would gladly trade your scenario for mine-- where the only issue is a few inches and not an entirely bum leg.

    So... be accountable for the decision YOU made. Move on. Sell him. Buy something else. But really, time to let it go....
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  20. #120
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2004
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    E. Washington
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    693

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Lu View Post
    I get that you're upset if what you heard is the truth. You have every right to be upset. That said, I can't imagine purchasing a horse without talking to the owner myself. After all, it's your $$. But there's not much you can do about it now, so I'd just let it go.

    In terms of height, I also get that you love the horse but he's bigger than you'd like and is greener than you want. I disagree that everyone wants a big horse (I would not choose to buy a 17.1 hh horse) and I disagree that you should "buck up" and ride a horse you are apprehensive about because lets face it - it's a recipe for you to lose your confidence as a rider at best, or get hurt at worse. And you may never reach his or your potential if you are mismatched. There's no reason for you to feel like you should keep him unless you *want* to.

    I suggest selling him and purchasing a horse that is more your size and with the experience level that is comfortable for you. There's likely someone out there who'd love to get your large greenbean - everyone is happy in the end.

    Just my thoughts...
    This is very good advice. I got a younger fjordX, was supposed to be 6 but was 8. Owner was confused, time does fly by. Lovely horse, I owned him for over 8 years. Never came off of him, he turned out to be versatile and lovely. He was just under 15.3, 1400# and very drafty. He was so wide he hurt my back and I had a hard time getting on him from the ground. Reaching up over him to mount was difficult because of the angles and lack of leverage.

    I decided to go to a smaller horse and didn't plan on selling him. I found a lovely AQHA mare, 15h, 1100#. Sturdy, big shouldered and not as broad in the back. Smooth gaited and so much easier to ride. My back didn't hurt so much, my confidence came back mounting from the ground and I adore this mare.

    I did sell the fjordX and I do miss him, but my little mare and I get along so well. I do the same things and she's going to be even better at our favorite activities.

    So, look around. See if you find another horse you like, you could love this next horse and it give you the incentive to move this guy on to be the perfect mount for someone else.



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