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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
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    44

    Default Is this frowned upon for a young sale horse?

    We have a wonderful '09 gelding that we currently have on the market. He is back home with us after 60 days in training and I am dying to start riding him myself. The problem is, I have not ridden on a regular basis in about 10 years. I rode him a few times after his original 30 days last spring and he was a gem. His most recent trainer states that he is perfect for an ammy and is safe, safe, safe. I am not worried about me because he doesn't have a mean bone in his body, but I also don't want to set him back since I am "rusty". What do you think? Go for it, or stay off of him if I want to keep him marketable?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2002
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    6,192

    Default

    How about getting some lessons with him? That way you'd have a pro there to help you, and you'd get to have fun with him.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    7,730

    Default

    Go for it! As a buyer, I look for a horse that has been ridden by more than just a pro. As long as you aren't trying to "train" him, just keeping him going W-T-C, muscled up and ready for an amateur to hop on, then that should be fine.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,998

    Default

    If he is pricey and fancy?

    well, horses of this age are very impressionable.

    so,
    If you can get on him and insure that you will allow him to find 100% steady contact 100% of the time, you can reassure him and fix his balance issues before he is worried about them, and allow him to move the fullness of his abilities then go for it.

    or

    If he is solid solid solid on the aids and already has the disposition of a school master and won't misunderstand his job if someone hangs on him for some of the ride or all of the ride.

    or,
    if he is an average or below average type of back yard sale.

    then go for it.

    Coming from someone who starts and trains young horses for sale--
    If they are fancy and pricey, I don't let anyone on them at that age.
    If they are average and are priced for a rider who is of adult ammy type or child then I do let others on.

    It's all in what you expect from this horse and how well of a young horse rider you are.

    Personally, I def think you should hop on for at least a hack!!!
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    33,715

    Default

    Whatever, don't let him sit, he has to stay in work to be presentable to buyers in this really tough for Green horses market. Plus he can easily forget what he learned if he does not practice regularly If you don't want to do it, see if you can find an ammy or older Junior who wants some extra saddle time (ammy has to do it for free but you can pay the Jr a little if desired and you think they are worth it).

    Contact your trainer and a few others in your area for recommendations.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    7,153

    Default

    From the original post, there is one serious danger I think you should consider.


    It really sounds as if riding him will risk the status of "sale horse" and possibly turn him into "keeper." If you're willing to take that risk, I say go ahead and ride.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed


    10 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    5,134

    Default

    I second the idea of riding him and take lessons with him. He will get the benefit of continued work, and you will get the benefit of the lessons to get back into the swing of things.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,236

    Default

    If you are truly concerned about interfering with his training, then I would find a local adult of junior that is experienced that would want to hop on a few days a week. Then you ride a few days a week. Have a consistent schedule and make sure whomever you bring in to help is really good and has experience with youngsters. Get references and keep him at home.

    He needs to work though, because having only 60 days on him is not enough to sell him in this market.
    Strong promoter of READING the entire post before responding.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,429

    Default

    It sounds like the choice is for the horse to sit at home, doing nothing, or for you to keep him in some light work...if so, go for the latter. Having shopped in the past for young horses, it is very frustrating to try to look at a young, started prospect that has been sitting. It isn't fair to the buyer and certainly not to the horse. In your shoes, I'd give the riding a try and if I felt like it wasn't going well, I'd have someone come in to help, whether that was the trainer who was recently working with him or perhaps someone they recommend. It is too bad you weren't able to take lessons while the horse was still at the training barn (or so I interpret what you wrote), but I'd still give it a go at home.

    But like the others have said, you'll run the risk of not wanting to sell! Have fun with him!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Thank you, everyone! I think I'll give it a go. I like the idea of doing some lessons on him, so I'll look into that. I already don't want to sell him..lol. Here is some video of him at about 3 weeks back in training - it shows his amazing temperament.
    Last edited by StoneLily; Jan. 3, 2013 at 09:32 PM.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    21

    Default

    No wonder you don't want to ride him! You'd fall in love! He is lovely.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2010
    Posts
    212

    Default I wouldn't be able to NOT ride him

    [QUOTE=StoneLily;6762473]Thank you, everyone! I think I'll give it a go. I like the idea of doing some lessons on him, so I'll look into that. I already don't want to sell him..lol. Here is some video of him at about 3 weeks back in training - it shows his amazing temperament.


    I love his video (drool)! Good luck and have fun.
    Last edited by IvyHall; Jan. 4, 2013 at 06:21 PM. Reason: Bc apparently I did something wrong



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    3,180

    Default

    I ride my super fancy young mare. I'm a good Ammy and confident on the flat. I took lessons on her. I can't begin to describe riding her at Devon, even though I did not show her. It was the best.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2011
    Location
    NC
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    2,341

    Default

    I'd be careful riding him, because if he was mine and for sale, I'd ride him and not be able bring myself to sell! What a LOVELY young horse!
    Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    This is the most clever advertising I have seen on COTH in a long time! Congrats OP, what a nice youngster.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Well, thank you to everyone who had nice comments and words of encouragement about getting back in the saddle on our homebred. Apparently, threads with videos make it an ad, so I will delete my video link.

    Editing:

    I've changed my mind. If the mods believe that this violates the rules of advertising, then please let me know and I will delete. I started the topic with a clear question of "would a green rider make a young horse less appealing to a buyer vs. leaving him turned out with his only training/riding done by a pro". I did not give the horse's name, pedigree, trainer, price, or any other details. I posted the video simply as a example of his kindness to show that he is not a 'fire breathing youngster' that I may get into trouble with. I do not believe that my post violate the rules. It must be exhausting to always look for the worst in people and their intentions. I am fairly new to the breeding world, but I hope that once I lose the passion and can no longer see and appreciate the joy and excitement in others' eyes (or posts), that I realize maybe it is time to move on to something else.
    Last edited by StoneLily; Jan. 3, 2013 at 10:17 PM.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Ivyhall, please delete the video link out of your quoted portion. Thank you!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,997

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StoneLily View Post
    Ivyhall, please delete the video link out of your quoted portion. Thank you!
    I appreciated the video & was glad to be able to still see it - he looks just where I'd like to see a young horse with 60 days

    I'd definitely have a lesson at least weekly - perhaps a lesson for yourself + a trainer ride, depending on what's available; though, OTOH given his age, as a buyer (which I'm not at this time), I'd be happy if you just threw him back out for a couple months to grow, then started him back again... I suspect it rather depends on your local market (& where/when you hope to sell him) whether you should keep him in work (& how much) at this stage.

    Of course, if you're in "waterworld" & your fields are closed until things dry up, then ride him more.

    Just remember that every ride you're "training" him - intended or not


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    OP, sorry if you were upset by my post. FWIW I didnt hit the alert button. Enjoy your lovely horse.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2006
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    845

    Default

    I am glad I got to see the video, I think the horse is lovely . I think it is better if he is ridden and agree with others that say have some lessons. I also think if you can arrange a pro-ride 1-2X (or as others suggested a very good ammy/ junior if you know any to save a little $$) per week that may be beneficial as well.



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