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  1. #1
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    Sep. 11, 2011
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    Default Insulin resistance/laminitis caused by pregnancy?

    I am so worried and confused, hoping someone can help.

    Background: 7yo Appendix mare, no history of laminitis/founder/insulin resistance, always out on grass, in foal and due in 8 weeks (first pregnancy). Recently (2 months ago) moved her back to my property. She has access to a round bale and gets pelleted vitamins each day but no grain. Not overweight but obviously being in foal she is heavier than normal.

    Problem: 12/31 notice heat in coronet band area of right front hoof. Several hours later, heat in three and by 1/1 slight warmth in coronet area on all four. Had given 1g of bute per vet on 12/31, gave another 1g of bute on 1/1 (today). Completely sound. Don't feel an abnormal digital pulse.

    Vet does not seem concerned since she is sound, said to keep the bute up for a few days. Did not recommend changing her diet or doing X-rays. Miniature pony companion is showing no similar signs.

    What else could cause warmth in that area of the hoof on all four? Should there be some warmth and I am just overreacting? Could the pregnancy have caused her to become insulin resistant and I should take her off the round bale? If this IS laminitis/founder shouldn't X-rays be done immediately? Is it possible that this is a sign of something wrong with her pregnancy?

    I am trying to tell myself not to worry if the vet isn't worried but it just doesn't seem right. Hoping some of you knowledgable COTH'ers will have some advice.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  2. #2
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    Mar. 20, 2011
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    Default

    put her out in the snow til you get your answer



  3. #3
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    Default

    Does she have a fever?



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by HealingHeart View Post
    Does she have a fever?
    No fever so far!
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
    put her out in the snow til you get your answer
    Too warm for snow here Wish we had a nice cold river.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  6. #6
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    Aug. 25, 2012
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    Has the mare had any sensitivity in her feet? Does she react at all to hoof testers? If a set of x-rays will give you piece of mind do them. With laminitis/foundered rather catch it earlier rather then later.



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwalker024 View Post
    Has the mare had any sensitivity in her feet? Does she react at all to hoof testers? If a set of x-rays will give you piece of mind do them. With laminitis/foundered rather catch it earlier rather then later.
    No sensitivity with hoof testers :-/ So, so odd. I think you are right, I need to just have them done so I can stop worrying (or start worrying about a different issue). I hope it's not something caused by the pregnancy.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  8. #8
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Yes, pregnancy can cause both... it happens and it's not fun to deal with a foundering pregnant mare. But if she is sound and comfortable, personally, I would not worry at this time. Just keep being diligent in case anything changes.

    Sometimes hooves are warmer than usual for no outwardly apparent explicable reason.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  9. #9
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    Aug. 25, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by OTTBcooper View Post
    No sensitivity with hoof testers :-/ So, so odd. I think you are right, I need to just have them done so I can stop worrying (or start worrying about a different issue). I hope it's not something caused by the pregnancy.
    Best to catch it early if it is. Although, I wouldn't immediately assume she is IR if I had to guess I'd say potentially mechanical founder due to her increased weight but if you wanted to rule out IR you could also have the vet test her glucose and insulin. Jingles for your mare!



  10. #10
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    Jan. 29, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwalker024 View Post
    If a set of x-rays will give you piece of mind do them. With laminitis/foundered rather catch it earlier rather then later.
    I agree, except a horse can have laminitis and not yet rotated so the xrays won't show anything right away.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToN Farm View Post
    I agree, except a horse can have laminitis and not yet rotated so the xrays won't show anything right away.
    Completely agree but at least it rules out the founder part of the equation. The other option I've thought of if you can go to a place like Autozone they will have hand held radar temperature reader guns that you can use to get a reading of the temperature of your horses feet. You have to be aware of the time you take the temperature and consistent with the outside environment factors. As in if you take a reading while the horse has been standing outside in the sun and then one while the horse has been in its stall for a few hours obviously there will be differences. Start tracking it though so you know what is normal or your horse and that can be helpful too.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texarkana View Post
    Yes, pregnancy can cause both... it happens and it's not fun to deal with a foundering pregnant mare. But if she is sound and comfortable, personally, I would not worry at this time. Just keep being diligent in case anything changes.

    Sometimes hooves are warmer than usual for no outwardly apparent explicable reason.
    Thank you so much Texarkana - your thoughts are right in line with my vets.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texarkana View Post
    Yes, pregnancy can cause both... it happens and it's not fun to deal with a foundering pregnant mare. But if she is sound and comfortable, personally, I would not worry at this time. Just keep being diligent in case anything changes.

    Sometimes hooves are warmer than usual for no outwardly apparent explicable reason.
    Thank you so much Texarkana - your thoughts are right in line with my vets.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwalker024 View Post
    Completely agree but at least it rules out the founder part of the equation. The other option I've thought of if you can go to a place like Autozone they will have hand held radar temperature reader guns that you can use to get a reading of the temperature of your horses feet. You have to be aware of the time you take the temperature and consistent with the outside environment factors. As in if you take a reading while the horse has been standing outside in the sun and then one while the horse has been in its stall for a few hours obviously there will be differences. Start tracking it though so you know what is normal or your horse and that can be helpful too.
    ToN and Kwalker - thank you! I think for now I will just keep a really close eye on her (and use those radar temperature guns!), and if anything gets worse or she starts to seem uncomfortable/lame then move forward with X-rays and blood work if nothing else to rule founder in/out. Poor thing. The pregnancy was NOT planned (free leased to a friend who's young pony got to her) so this is all very new to me!
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwalker024 View Post
    The other option I've thought of if you can go to a place like Autozone they will have hand held radar temperature reader guns that you can use to get a reading of the temperature of your horses feet. .
    there have been several unpublished studies on this that showed so much variation in the same horse, and between horses, that there was no significance. I also tried it on my two ponies, and there was no correlation between the sore one and the sound one.



  16. #16
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    One warm hoof =/= laminitis. Be vigilant, but I wouldn't be worried just yet. I notice my horses' hooves are a little warmer if they've been outside for a long time and have not been lying down. Maybe she's getting too big and round to lie down comfortably, or maybe it's just one of those things. Good luck!
    Click here before you buy.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    One warm hoof =/= laminitis. Be vigilant, but I wouldn't be worried just yet. I notice my horses' hooves are a little warmer if they've been outside for a long time and have not been lying down. Maybe she's getting too big and round to lie down comfortably, or maybe it's just one of those things. Good luck!
    This is what I am hoping! Her feet have got to be more sore now that she's carrying a lamb-sized being in her little body. Thank you!
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  18. #18
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    I can tell you one thing - I will always test my hay before purchasing it from now on! A little harder to do since I only buy 150-200 bales a year, or rounds. But definitely worth it.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Watts View Post
    there have been several unpublished studies on this that showed so much variation in the same horse, and between horses, that there was no significance. I also tried it on my two ponies, and there was no correlation between the sore one and the sound one.
    As I said you have to figure out what is "normal" for your horse. Every horse is different. I wouldn't say it is 100% fool proof but just another tool that can be used.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by OTTBcooper View Post
    I can tell you one thing - I will always test my hay before purchasing it from now on! A little harder to do since I only buy 150-200 bales a year, or rounds. But definitely worth it.
    I'm a huge fan of testing hay! Just keep an eye on your girl and if she is in bed her stall extra deep!



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