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  1. #101
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2002
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    Ontario, Canada
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    409

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    Quote Originally Posted by glfprncs View Post
    Bureau
    Supper (my mom is the only person I've heard use this instead of dinner in the last decade)
    Where I live ALL of the farmers call lunch "dinner" and dinner is "supper". Really threw me for a loop on several occasions when one would say "I'll bring a load of hay over after dinner" and the guy would roll in at 1:00, when I was thinking he would be here in the dark LOL. Oddly enough my husband, who is a born and bred city person before marrying me, has always called dinner "supper" as well. No idea why.



  2. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    I learned that one when I read To Kill a Mockingbird. Is it an old expression, a Southern one, or both?

    What about hassock?
    a footstool too small to be sat upon...and ottoman could be used for spare sitting a hassock not so much...in my own mind they are either antebellum or victorian or queen anne in design used with wing chairs...but that is just my generalizations in my own mind ;>
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,605

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    Tonic (vs. "soda")
    daft
    dungarees
    my grandfather referred to a cast iron frying pan as a spider

    My family used chest of drawers to mean a tall one, and bureau to mean a short one.
    Same in our family.

    Does anyone know the definition of 'hough'? Used in a Mark Twain horse based short story.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  4. #104
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,061

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    Don't even THINK of putting soda in my gin and tonic.

    We called an ottoman a pouf.

    My dad would say it is five and twenty to two, or five and twenty past two, etc.

    In a world increasingly multilingual, there are bound to be a lot of cross-over words, and many of these I see are of English origin, which I grew upwith.

    Any German, French, Spanish lingo that is common parlance (taco does not count).
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  5. #105
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
    Posts
    7,842

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    out of context "hough" might be a challenge

    twain often wrote words in the vernacular, trying to illustrate a way of pronounching or mispronouncing a word(s)

    right enough might elide to "hough"
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com



  6. #106
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    506

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Tatterdemalion . . . how about virago?
    In the 1942 dictionary, virago: a turbulent woman; vixen
    In the 2009 dictionary, virago: a domineering, violent, or bad tempered woman
    I think I like 'turbulent' better.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
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    506

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    Quote Originally Posted by fooler View Post
    Same in our family.

    Does anyone know the definition of 'hough'? Used in a Mark Twain horse based short story.
    In the old dictionary and the regular OED it says hough is a variant spelling of hock.



  8. #108
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    5,729

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    Quote Originally Posted by fooler View Post
    Same in our family.

    Does anyone know the definition of 'hough'? Used in a Mark Twain horse based short story.
    If you pronounce it with the Scots ending like Loch it'll make sense.

    ETA: oops, missed Crackerdog's response.



  9. #109
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    5,729



  10. #110
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,605

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoopoe View Post
    out of context "hough" might be a challenge

    twain often wrote words in the vernacular, trying to illustrate a way of pronounching or mispronouncing a word(s)

    right enough might elide to "hough"
    From Twain's "A Horse's Tale" in speaking of a bull fight:

    "Yes, Sometimes a bull is timid, finding himself in so strange a place and he stands trembling, or tries to retreat. Then everybody despises him for his cowardice and wants him punished and made ridiculous: so they hough him from behind, and it is the funiest thing in the world to see him hobbling around on his severed legs: the whole vast house goes into hurricanes of laughter over it; I have laughed till the tears ran down my cheeks to see it. When he has furnished all the sport he can, he is not any longer useful and is killed".

    My thought was the animal's hamstrings are severed.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  11. #111
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    2,732

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    trollop and strumpet
    My grandmother used to fuss at us if we were "going out dressed as a trollop." Translations: short shorts
    Free bar.ka and tidy rabbit.



  12. #112
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    Dec. 29, 1999
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    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by fooler View Post
    From Twain's "A Horse's Tale" in speaking of a bull fight:

    "so they hough him from behind, and it is the funiest thing in the world to see him hobbling around on his severed legs: the whole vast house goes into hurricanes of laughter over it; I have laughed till the tears ran down my cheeks to see it. When he has furnished all the sport he can, he is not any longer useful and is killed".

    My thought was the animal's hamstrings are severed.
    Yes, when used as a verb it means to hamstring.



  13. #113
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
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    4,605

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    Yes, when used as a verb it means to hamstring.
    Thanks for the confirmation!
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  14. #114
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    979

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    IIRC, cattywampus means "askew" or "crooked," not at diagonal corners.
    Yes! That is the technical definition of cattywompass...I knew I didn't have it quite right, thank you!



  15. #115
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crackerdog View Post
    In the 1942 dictionary, virago: a turbulent woman; vixen
    In the 2009 dictionary, virago: a domineering, violent, or bad tempered woman
    I think I like 'turbulent' better.
    I like "vixen"!



  16. #116
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    Feb. 27, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by clint View Post
    Love those words! I think britches is vastly superior to trousers, and I still remember my grandmother using icebox. Bumberchute for umbrella is a fave of mine, also used by her.
    Britches was a more common usage. (where common means vulgar or coarse, not of frequent occurrance ). It was indelicate for a lady to be said to wear britches, instead she wore trousers.



  17. #117
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy's Girl View Post
    Favorite, forgotten words? Crepuscular, tatterdemalion, bonkers... I'll think of too many to list. I love the English language! I get the Shakespearian insult of the day on my homepage, and it's usually full of oldies but goodies.
    I too love crepuscular! The wolf is a crepuscular carnivore, active at dawn and dusk.



  18. #118
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by hastyreply View Post
    Britches was a more common usage. (where common means vulgar or coarse, not of frequent occurrance ). It was indelicate for a lady to be said to wear britches, instead she wore trousers.

    And now a modern usage for trousers is the abbreviation, "trou" as in, "to drop trou".

    Do people still say that , or was that just in my college days?



  19. #119
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    14,968

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    Quote Originally Posted by Houndhill View Post
    I like "vixen"!
    Vixen is technically a female fox, no?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  20. #120
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    Feb. 27, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Houndhill View Post
    And now a modern usage for trousers is the abbreviation, "trou" as in, "to drop trou".

    Do people still say that , or was that just in my college days?
    I've never heard that particular expression. Maybe it was a regional one. Sounds a bit common to me. LOL



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