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  1. #41
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    Oct. 23, 2004
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    I am rather shocked that these words are considered antiquated!

    I guess I'm older that I thought!

    Oh... and I just ordered that book
    Kanoe Godby
    www.dyrkgodby.com
    See, I was raised by wolves and am really behind the 8-ball on diplomatic issue resolution.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
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    Feb. 4, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crackerdog View Post
    Today I was at the used bookstore and I found a Funk and Wagnalls Concise Standard Dictionary from 1942 and learned some new old words like grimalkin and megrim. I know there isn't much use for these words in today's world, but I still like to know them.

    Does anyone else have this kind of interest? Or am I just weird?
    The second cat I ever owned was named Gimalkin. We called her Grimmie for short.

    Something I don't hear anymore is the way my grandmother would tell the time. She would never say 10:30 or 10:45 for example. If it was 10:30 it was "half past" 10. 10:45 would be "a quarter to" 11. I don't recall that she ever narrowed it down closer than that. She took the closest 15 minute interval and went with it.
    Last edited by mswillie; Dec. 31, 2012 at 09:46 PM. Reason: clarity


    6 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
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    Dec. 22, 2000
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by hastyreply View Post
    I find I am often flummoxed these days.
    I like to use that one, as well as flabbergasted. And dastardly whenever possible.

    The other fun movie quote to slip in to conversation: "I'm disinclined to acquiesce to your request. Means no." From Pirates of the Carribbean.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    the Armpit of the Nation
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    Quote Originally Posted by halo View Post
    Heard one today in conversation, britches.
    I say this all the time Actually I dont know anyone who says "breeches". Is this breeches thing new??

    Apoplexy

    Blotto - my grandma used that one

    Crummy

    Rotter - as in, he's a rotter - another grandma expression.
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  5. #45
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    Feb. 26, 2011
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    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
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    I get teased for using pail instead of bucket. I think some might be regional, like dinner and supper. If I am having a bunch of people over for a noon meal and making something big like fried chicken, dinner is at noon. If I am having people over for something late, it is supper.
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  6. #46
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    Feb. 4, 2009
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    NCC DE
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    Quote Originally Posted by rustbreeches View Post
    I get teased for using pail instead of bucket. I think some might be regional, like dinner and supper. If I am having a bunch of people over for a noon meal and making something big like fried chicken, dinner is at noon. If I am having people over for something late, it is supper.
    I use both, to me a pail is smaller like a feed pail. The bucket is bigger, like a water bucket. Don't know if it's just me or not.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
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    Apr. 4, 2009
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    555

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    A while back I got on an English and Russian literature kick, and read everything Tolstoy, Dostyevsky and Somerset Maugham wrote. (Fasinating, loved every torturous hours of the slog through! Took forever, too.)
    Anyway, I loved how they always called the inhabitants of apartments, hotels, schools, INMATES. I would go around using that term myself, and got not a few horrified looks from the average folk. Too bad "inmates" are only referred to as guests of penal institutes now. ;D



  8. #48
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    Aug. 30, 2007
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    Sunny Florida
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    I actually wore bloomers ( or knickers) and remember my grandparents' ice box. I guess that makes me really old, huh?
    "I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you..."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #49
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Twin Cities
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    I still say & hear half past/quarter 'til. More in New England than in midwest.

    I hear "half ten" on BBC & do not know if that is half past or half before/

    Bureau and couch are old?

    I had 2 apts with old iceboxes, used them to store wine & garbage bags



  10. #50
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    a lot of what I currently hear as Midwestern terms I associate with my Grandmother's generation back east:

    dungarees, tennis shoes, jersey (shirt), dinner for lunch



  11. #51
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    Oct. 9, 2012
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    Washington State
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luseride View Post
    What do those two words mean?

    I love words and know if I open a dictionary I will become distracted very quickly reading words and their meanings.
    If this is for me...
    grimalkin means an old cat
    megrim is a headache on only one side of your head. I get those all the time and now I have a simple word for it instead of having to say, "I have a headache on this one side of my head."

    I'm loving the words you guys are using. We do use 'supper' and 'icebox' in our house but say 'dresser' for chest of drawers/bureau.



  12. #52
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkenStormy View Post
    Chiffarobe
    What's a chiffarobe?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adamantane View Post
    My grandmother used to use "d'ast" which to the archaic past participle of 'to dare' as in "D'ast (or dastn't) you do [this]." Or "You dastn't do that."
    I think some freaks have said "daren't"-- present for dare not.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rallycairn View Post
    Hey, what else do you call a chest of drawers? A bureau?
    Not a bureau. That goes on the rubbish heap. It's a dresser now.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  15. #55

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    a chifferobe is a sort of a armoire for clothes.
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  16. #56
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamara in TN View Post
    a chifferobe is a sort of a armoire for clothes.
    I learned that one when I read To Kill a Mockingbird. Is it an old expression, a Southern one, or both?

    What about hassock?



  17. #57
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Swivet
    What's that?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  18. #58
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    Jan. 7, 2001
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    Usually too far from the barn
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    Whilst I am partial to bureau, I like chest of drawers as well.

    My parents (born in 1920) both used "half past" and "quarter to" and my Dad always used "icebox" rather than refrigerator. The thing we sat on in the living room was a sofa and we put our feet on a hassock.

    Mom was an English major and when I was about 6 or 7 I had this encounter with her...
    Me: Mom! Can I go out and play?
    Mom: Yes, you can, but you may not...

    I wasn't sure what it meant other than that I had been hoisted by my own petard.
    F O.B
    Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
    Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
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    Feb. 14, 2003
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    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
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    A swivet: upset, extreme agitation "Don't get in a swivet over spilled milk!"
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  20. #60
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    Aug. 9, 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
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    42

    Default Canadian content

    Chesterfield. I don't think it was used south of the border.



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