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  1. #1
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Default Losing weight in 2013

    Every year it's the same: going to finally get the weight off. Ideally about 70 pounds but since I'll never be 19 again, 40-50 would suffice.

    Every morning I wake up with firm resolve and do really well until about 4:00. Between 4 and bedtime I turn into a person who doesn't know the person who got up. And every night I go to bed with regrets over the opportunities that were thrown away.

    I'd like to break the cycle in 2013 but haven't a clue what more I can do. I've analyzed and worked on this problem ever since I went on birth control pills back in 1966. Of course, don't take them now. lol

    I'd love to lose weight to improve my diabetes, my riding, my general well being and, believe it or not, so that the outside of me matches the vision I have on the inside...where I'm young, slender and fit.

    Oh, how to get from here to there.

    So what are you doing to FINALLY get the weight off?

    I lost 40 pounds in 2010 and 2011. Today I'm up 7 pounds from that but down 10 pounds from Dec. 31, 2011.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    40,125

    Default

    Get the last Psychology Today, February 2013 issue (Walmart has it here) and there is a good article with some of the latest on losing weight.

    There you can find some tricks on how to use your own circadian rhythm, with what we know today, to help your metabolism.
    That could be a starting point.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    12,183

    Default

    My qualifications for giving advice -- I have lost 95 pounds since January, 2012. This is the site I used to do it. http://caloriecount.about.com/foods

    This site has the most calorie information of any site out there, but there are others (a good number of COTHers used My Fitness Pal for a while). And, this site gives you nutritional grades and exercise programs, plus forums where you can communicate with others who are also dieting.

    The key, and I suspect that you already know this, is will-power. You have to be determined to do it. It's not going to work, otherwise.

    However, the important thing to remember is that you don't HAVE to follow all of the dieting rules out there. For instance, I'm like you. I am good to go throughout the day. Keeping to my diet schedule is pretty easy. Late afternoon and evening, I always get a bad case of galloping ravenousitis. So, I don't follow the, undoubtedly right, recommendation that you eat your biggest meals early in the day and eat lightly at night. It makes sense to do it that way, because you have all day to burn those calories off, but it will not work for me.

    I eat my breakfast around 10 or 11 AM. It's usually a bowl of some kind of organic cereal that is high in fiber. I used non-fat milk at first, before I discovered that I liked the unsweetened almond milk just as well, and it had more calcium and fewer calories.

    I eat lunch around 2 PM. Again, it's light. Sometimes I have a salad, sometimes I cook up a large bowl of veggies, sometimes I have a protein drink. I use the Spiro-tein brand for that, but you may find another that you like better. Again, I started out with no-fat milk, and switched to unsweetened almond milk. The shakes taste better with the milk, so that may be the way to start out.

    That last sentence reminds me of something else. Don't start cutting everything out. I found that, as I went along, it was easier to switch from a lower, but not totally calorie food, to an even lower calorie food. An example, for instance is that I went from 50% fat cheese to 75% cheese about half way through the diet. Now, I'm back up to regular cheese, because I'm through dieting and just want to maintain, or lose the remaining five pounds very gradually.

    I always eat a good supper, and I spread it out over a couple of hours. I will have the meat, an hour later I may have a yam or some other starch, and, finally, an hour or so later again, I will have my veggie.

    The important part for me was that I always saved some of my calories for an evening snack. I found out quickly that I literally could not get through the night without something to munch on. Air popped popcorn is great for this, by the way. It's low calorie and high in fiber. I found this great microwave popcorn bowl on Amazon. You don't have to go out and invest in a fancy air popper. http://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Ware-60...popper+hot+air
    Other late night snacks that I found were good were raisins, apricots, prunes, the Kashi snack bars (yum), almonds (calorie count has the calories for one almond so you can count them out), and Weight Watchers Giant Fudge Bars which are absolutely yummyhttp://www.weightwatchers.com/shop/c...pageid=1056551 I will go right on eating them, even on maintenance, just because they're so good. I also allowed myself one piece of candy a day, calories counted in, of course. I found Hershey's kisses to be golden for this. There are a ton of different varieties, and they are only around 20 calories apiece.

    A couple more hints, and then I'll shut up. Make sure you watch your fiber. Calorie count says 21 grams is good. I found that I had to get up to around 35 grams. Otherwise, I got horribly constipated (sorry, TMI). Metamucil or some other fiber supplements are very useful. Watch your fat intake, too. With all the low fat and not fat foods out there, it's easy to find that you are eating too little fat. And, again, eating too little fat can tie your innards up good. Go to your doctor and go through your plans with him/her. Then, go back every couple of months and have bloodwork done. That will assure that you are staying on the right track nutritionally and that your body isn't suffering for it. And, make sure you take a vitamin every day. You're not eating much food, so you need to make sure that you're getting enough essentials.

    Good luck. Listen, if I can do it, anyone can. I am a foodaholic. I always have been, and I always will be. It's a matter of loving your body and your health more than your food, and recognizing that you're making life long changes and not going back to your old habits once the weight has come off.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.


    13 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
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    6,704

    Default

    Get a good qualified nutritionist with a doctorate degree.
    Get a good personal trainer that has a bachelors degree and has worked with diabetics

    The more you dabble and sample diets to try and find what'll work for you, the more you'll wreck your metabolism. I could write out what works for me but I'm not you. What works for me could hurt you.

    So set aside $5k in 2013 to devote to your wellness and track down the folks mentioned above.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble


    6 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    12,183

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    Get a good qualified nutritionist with a doctorate degree.
    Get a good personal trainer that has a bachelors degree and has worked with diabetics

    The more you dabble and sample diets to try and find what'll work for you, the more you'll wreck your metabolism. I could write out what works for me but I'm not you. What works for me could hurt you.

    So set aside $5k in 2013 to devote to your wellness and track down the folks mentioned above.
    I respectfully disagree that that's the only way to do this. You don't have to drop that kind of money to follow a diet that someone else has prescribed for you. And, dropping that kind of money doesn't insure that you will lose the weight. They don't know you as well as you know yourself. You have to want to lose the weight and you have to use common sense. There are lots of people out there who have lost weight without that kind of expensive help. It's one way, if you have the cash to spend. Most of us, I expect, don't.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    2,893

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    I'm also trying to get back on track with weight loss/fitness for 2013.

    I once again hired a personal trainer (package deal - comes with "eating plan" and homework). In 2010 I first hired a personal trainer and lost about 30 pounds and I felt sooooo good, so strong and so healthy.

    The emphasis for me was on fitness/health more than weight loss.

    I kind of dropped off that wagon after my wedding/selling my house/buying the farm/getting the horses home, but I'm ready to get back on track.

    My workouts are the Crossfit type, so that includes weight lifting, cardio, gymnastics, etc. The eating plan is leaning towards the Zone diet/ Paleo/low carb, with focus more on adding healthy foods to your diet, not so much counting calories.

    It was expensive for me to hire the trainer, but it works for me because I get 100% of her attention when I'm at the gym working out (I do one workout at the gym each week and she sends me home with 4 workouts to complete during the week), and I'm able to ask questions about workouts, nutrition, while I'm there. It makes me accountable.

    Best of luck to you in 2013!
    Jigga:
    Why must you chastise my brilliant idea with facts and logic? **picks up toys (and wine) and goes home**



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
    Posts
    3,775

    Default The endocrinology of fat:

    The bottom line is THIS:

    (1) Whenever you eat carbohydrates, your blood glucose rises.
    (2) This causes insulin to be secreted.
    (3) The insulin removes the glucose by storing it as more fat.
    (4) Without that energy available, you get hungrier and eat more.
    (5) Exercise makes you hungrier yet.
    (6) Calorie restriction always fails in time because it is starvation.
    (7) If you're already insulin-resistant (diabetic), it's even harder to have any effect on this process.

    What WILL help:

    (1) Cut out ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING made with flour or sugar NOW. That includes almost 100% of packaged, processed food.

    (2) Restrict fruit as well--most of it is about 65% sugar

    (3) Eat freely of meat, fish, poultry, cheese, nuts, and ALL GREEN, non-starchy vegetables.

    (4) Drink pleny of water and watch the fat melt off.

    (5) If you're on meds for diabetes, you're going to have to be monitored through this process; but it WILL work if you resolve to eat this way for LIFE!!!

    The standard, thoughtless American diet has over the last 25 years mutated to the point where most of it has minimal nutrition and maximum empty calories. At the same time, we have stopped eating the (animal) food groups which for millions of years were what we actually EVOLVED to eat. The result is the crashing health of millions of Americans that you see.

    If the "conventional wisdom" is telling millions of people to do something, and they are doing it, and across the board getting fatter and sicker by the minute--fer chrissakes, do something ELSE because their "theory" by definition is WRONG.

    (And if you knew how little legitimate science backs up ANY mainstream "dietary" wisdom, you'd just DIE! You can solve your problem starting today, but you MUST DARE to think outside the "box" of BigAg/BigPharma's propagandists!)

    For further reading: http://www.amazon.com/Why-We-Get-Fat...to+do+about+it

    Best of Luck!


    7 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Dec. 10, 2009
    Posts
    138

    Default

    I'm reading Primal Blueprint / paleo. sounds so easy...



  9. #9
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    1,778

    Default

    What is so frustrating is that I DO know what to do. I really love my diabetic diet because I make up recipes and make over recipes. It's like spa food. My biggest problem is that after 4 I don't even remember that I'm on a diet. My appetite...as opposed to hunger...kicks in and wow....watch out for everything that isn't nailed down!

    FOCUS FOCUS FOCUS!!!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
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    1,778

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    Lady Eboshi, that is basically how I eat. And no, the fat doesn't melt off. I'm sure age has something to do with that. I used to be able to lose a couple of pounds a week; now I can't seem to get off even 1 pound a week.

    But, ya, been on the high protein, no grain-based carbs and limited fruit for years. Actually, I think that's part of the problem because when I go off my diet it's always for starchy carbs. I think there's something metabolic going on with that but haven't figured out what.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 8, 2012
    Posts
    30

    Default

    I basically do low carb, holidays and such I have *free* days. I think this helps a lot.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
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    All 'round Canadia
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    Logging is what worked for me. I used Livestrong's DailyPlate, but any of the free calorie-count sites are fine.

    And I logged everything. When I went off the skids and had 4 servings of ice cream, it got logged faithfully. Seeing it there every day, and the bar going into the red, really helped me keep to my eating plan.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
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    480

    Default

    OP, I don't know your exact circumstances, nor do I know much about Diabetic eating, so take this with a grain of salt (it may work for you, it may not). However, it sounds like you get very specific, and very ravenous cravings. So, I'm wondering - could you allow yourself to have a *controlled* portion of the carbs (or whatever) each evening? That would hopefully satisfy your craving, while keeping you from eating a lot. If you don't think this would work, I would encourage you to literally *savor* every bite of that controlled amount as you eat it. Roll it around in your mouth, take your time, experience the food. Because two things will happen: 1) You're craving should be satisfied with less by truly *tasting* it and enjoying it as you eat, and 2) You'll become full faster by taking so much time.

    As time goes on, it's possible you may be able to successfully lessen the amount of the craved food, or maybe even get rid of it altogether. But for now, if it were me, I'd allow myself a certain amount just so I can control the amount I am taking in.

    Best of luck - I hope you find this journey a lot easier in 2013!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 11, 2008
    Posts
    363

    Default

    I use the same site Louise uses and religiously log everything I eat. After a while you just train yourself to think "is is REALLY worth the calories", "do I REALLY want this or would I rather eat a, b and c later". I too tend to get hungry in the evening and often plan my day for a bigger dinner and lower calories breakfast and lunch.

    As for all that "don't eat after 8 PM", "don't eat any processes foods", etc etc... All I can say is dinner time at my house is typically between 8:30- 9:30 PM and I'll admit I eat a lot of processed foods (more than I should I know). I've gone from a size 14 to a size 8 since March.

    Oh, edited to add, I try to ride 4-5 days per week and with working full time and a 30 minute commute each way, I haven't found time to go to the gym or do any formal workouts (don't enjoy it that much either and it NEVER gives me tons of energy). Horsie is a part-lease who is on pasture board so besides riding I just have grooming and going to and from turnout.

    Maybe this isn't the ideal, textbook way to lose weight, but logging what I eat and staying in a set calorie range has worked for me. I have a co-worker how does P90x 4x a week at least but doesn't pay attention at all to what she eats. She is probably fitter than me, but I doubt she's lost more than 5 pounds all year.



  15. #15
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    Feb. 20, 2010
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    All 'round Canadia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iechris View Post
    As for all that "don't eat after 8 PM", "don't eat any processes foods", etc etc... All I can say is dinner time at my house is typically between 8:30- 9:30 PM and I'll admit I eat a lot of processed foods (more than I should I know). I've gone from a size 14 to a size 8 since March.
    Oh yeah, I eat the vast majority of my calories in the evening. That's just when I like to eat. I reached my goal weight no problem doing that, just keeping to the overall calorie goal.
    I don't eat that many processed foods, but I haven't cut out carbs or anything.



  16. #16
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    Apr. 29, 2006
    Location
    Evansville, Wisconsin
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    3,081

    Default

    My eating inclinations are similiar to the OP's. Mornings are easy, lunch is fine, but at 4:30pm, I'm ravenous. No matter what I've eaten earlier in the day, at 4:30, my timer goes off.

    After trying to change that unsuccesfully, I eventually just decided to take that as a given, assume that I would probably eat at around that time, and then sort everything else out accordingly.

    I don't keep many fast and easy foods around, or I will eat them. Most of the time, you won't find chips, cookies, crackers, or anything like that in my house.

    I do my own cooking, lots and lots of vegetables and some lean meats, but I often find that I really don't feel satisfied without a little bit of carbs. It's probably mental, but I try to budget them in, and I only eat them after I've eaten my chicken and greens (or whatever)that makes it much easier to stick to reasonable quantities.

    DH often works late, but I generally start cooking at 4-4:30 when I get hungry, and then I reheat a plate for him when he gets home. I find that I'm actually pretty good about not eating when I'm cooking, since I feel like the food is coming so I can wait for it.

    Eating dinner earlier and then having a small evening snack at around 8pm is what works for me. Getting to bed on time is also really important for me. If I stay up past 10, I will feel hungry again, to the point where I will be unable to sleep without eating something.

    Another thing that helps me in the evenings is drinking tea an knitting. I love my tea plain, and there are some that taste rather sweet even without anything added. Sometimes that's enough to help me with "sweet" cravings. And knitting keeps me from snacking mindlessly while watching movies and such. It keeps my hands busy, and I don't want to get crumbs and such on my work.

    And I've spent a ton of time talking with doctors and nutritionists to find strategies that work well for me. Because honestly, it's not the same for everyone.

    And I'm certainly not perfect. Coming to terms with just how little I have to eat in order to lose weight was rough (apparently I'm a very easy keeper :P), and it didn't happen overnight. It took me at least a year before I even started losing weight, but eventually I got enough of the kinks worked out to start the scalle creeping slowly in the right direction. So far I've lost 30lbs in the last year, and I still have another 30 or so to go.

    Medications can make a difference, too. I'm not talking about weight loss medications, but rather sitting down with your doctor and talknig about your current medications to see if there's anything that might cause less weight gain than what you're currently on, if you have any meds that are contributing to the problem. Switching antidepressants was a huge help for me, personally.

    I've been on My Fitness Pal with some of the other folks here on CotH, and that helps, too. http://www.myfitnesspal.com/groups/h...-horse-fitness Many of us are still active as MFP friends even though the group page doesn't see much action.

    Anyhow, that's kind of long, and mostly anecdotal stuff about what works for me. But absolutely talk to your doctor, get a dietician/nutritionist on board if at all possible. And don't beat yourself up about what you ate yesterday and then throw in the towel, just do the best you can every day at every meal.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2004
    Posts
    331

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    My qualifications for giving advice -- I have lost 95 pounds since January, 2012. This is the site I used to do it. http://caloriecount.about.com/foods

    This site has the most calorie information of any site out there, but there are others (a good number of COTHers used My Fitness Pal for a while). And, this site gives you nutritional grades and exercise programs, plus forums where you can communicate with others who are also dieting.

    The key, and I suspect that you already know this, is will-power. You have to be determined to do it. It's not going to work, otherwise.

    However, the important thing to remember is that you don't HAVE to follow all of the dieting rules out there. For instance, I'm like you. I am good to go throughout the day. Keeping to my diet schedule is pretty easy. Late afternoon and evening, I always get a bad case of galloping ravenousitis. So, I don't follow the, undoubtedly right, recommendation that you eat your biggest meals early in the day and eat lightly at night. It makes sense to do it that way, because you have all day to burn those calories off, but it will not work for me.

    I eat my breakfast around 10 or 11 AM. It's usually a bowl of some kind of organic cereal that is high in fiber. I used non-fat milk at first, before I discovered that I liked the unsweetened almond milk just as well, and it had more calcium and fewer calories.

    I eat lunch around 2 PM. Again, it's light. Sometimes I have a salad, sometimes I cook up a large bowl of veggies, sometimes I have a protein drink. I use the Spiro-tein brand for that, but you may find another that you like better. Again, I started out with no-fat milk, and switched to unsweetened almond milk. The shakes taste better with the milk, so that may be the way to start out.

    That last sentence reminds me of something else. Don't start cutting everything out. I found that, as I went along, it was easier to switch from a lower, but not totally calorie food, to an even lower calorie food. An example, for instance is that I went from 50% fat cheese to 75% cheese about half way through the diet. Now, I'm back up to regular cheese, because I'm through dieting and just want to maintain, or lose the remaining five pounds very gradually.

    I always eat a good supper, and I spread it out over a couple of hours. I will have the meat, an hour later I may have a yam or some other starch, and, finally, an hour or so later again, I will have my veggie.

    The important part for me was that I always saved some of my calories for an evening snack. I found out quickly that I literally could not get through the night without something to munch on. Air popped popcorn is great for this, by the way. It's low calorie and high in fiber. I found this great microwave popcorn bowl on Amazon. You don't have to go out and invest in a fancy air popper. http://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Ware-60...popper+hot+air
    Other late night snacks that I found were good were raisins, apricots, prunes, the Kashi snack bars (yum), almonds (calorie count has the calories for one almond so you can count them out), and Weight Watchers Giant Fudge Bars which are absolutely yummyhttp://www.weightwatchers.com/shop/c...pageid=1056551 I will go right on eating them, even on maintenance, just because they're so good. I also allowed myself one piece of candy a day, calories counted in, of course. I found Hershey's kisses to be golden for this. There are a ton of different varieties, and they are only around 20 calories apiece.

    A couple more hints, and then I'll shut up. Make sure you watch your fiber. Calorie count says 21 grams is good. I found that I had to get up to around 35 grams. Otherwise, I got horribly constipated (sorry, TMI). Metamucil or some other fiber supplements are very useful. Watch your fat intake, too. With all the low fat and not fat foods out there, it's easy to find that you are eating too little fat. And, again, eating too little fat can tie your innards up good. Go to your doctor and go through your plans with him/her. Then, go back every couple of months and have bloodwork done. That will assure that you are staying on the right track nutritionally and that your body isn't suffering for it. And, make sure you take a vitamin every day. You're not eating much food, so you need to make sure that you're getting enough essentials.

    Good luck. Listen, if I can do it, anyone can. I am a foodaholic. I always have been, and I always will be. It's a matter of loving your body and your health more than your food, and recognizing that you're making life long changes and not going back to your old habits once the weight has come off.
    I am LOVING this whole thread, but you in particular!! What an inspiration!!!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
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    2,893

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    Quote Originally Posted by ezduzit View Post
    What is so frustrating is that I DO know what to do. I really love my diabetic diet because I make up recipes and make over recipes. It's like spa food. My biggest problem is that after 4 I don't even remember that I'm on a diet. My appetite...as opposed to hunger...kicks in and wow....watch out for everything that isn't nailed down!

    FOCUS FOCUS FOCUS!!!
    Is there a chance that you're not really hungry, but rather thirsty, bored or frustrated? If you're really starving at that time of day, maybe you need to change your eating schedule a little -- like eat a really good snack around 3:30pm; something with fat and protein. I usually have a decent sized snack around that time and then I can wait until 7pm or so for supper. Great snack foods are things like nuts, cheese, avocados, tuna, celery w cream cheese, greek yogurt with a few berries.
    Do you usually eat lunch at noon and then try to wait until after 5pm for supper? Letting yourself go hungry can really derail healthy eating attempts.
    Jigga:
    Why must you chastise my brilliant idea with facts and logic? **picks up toys (and wine) and goes home**



  19. #19
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    Jul. 24, 2008
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    Also wanted to add -- stay away from sugar (obvious, with you being a diabetic) but also stay away from reduced-fat products! Totally! Fat does not make you fat.
    Jigga:
    Why must you chastise my brilliant idea with facts and logic? **picks up toys (and wine) and goes home**


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Definitely tired and therefore bored. If I have something exciting to do, I breeze right thru. But usually I'm too tired to be excited about anything. And BLEH...I never eat a processed "low fat" product. They are just disgusting and loaded with other bad stuff.

    I've thought about weight watchers. There's a meeting walking distance from my house, at a church. I went to one meeting years ago and never went back. The leader talked about cleaning up after her kid's birthday party and then going and getting the trash bag out of the garage @ 3 a.m. She said she stood IN the bag and ate cake off the plates. Just never could identify with THAT. I couldn't help thinking "I am NOT you people." The ones who were nodding their heads in agreement that they had done that too. Ewwwww.......


    1 members found this post helpful.

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