The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    975

    Default Tell me about Pony Jumpers....

    I come from eventer land, and know nothing about pony jumpers.... and very little about hunter/jumper land.

    I tried a pony prospect this morning who screams pony jumper and I'm trying to decide if its worth it to put some more rideable miles on her and try to resell her.

    She has a ton of jump,can easily do 3+ , is only 13'1-2, can be a little spicy, but listened (or listened to me who can and will ride just about anything).
    Could probably do the hunters after some work.
    How good of riders are these kids that do pony jumpers or hunters? Do they know when a half halt is needed and know how to do one? When I was that age, I didn't, but I was also a kid on a pony yeehawing around my farm, not in a lesson program or anything close to it.
    I didn't find her jump hard to stay with, but it wasn't an easy smooth jump. She was a bouncy ball.

    I'm in Ohio...

    tell me about the pony jumper market and what is expected out of a jumper and even a pony hunter

    Thanks!
    -Chelsie
    "Hell yes I can ride. I was riding when I fell off!"



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2005
    Posts
    3,504

    Default

    Pony jumpers go at 3'6". 13.1 is going to be a hard sell, no matter how high the thing can jump, just for suitability reasons. A kid small enough to be suitable and good enough to do the 3'6" on something non-pushbuttonish is going to be hard to come by.

    From your description, she doesn't sound like a hunter prospect. I could be wrong, though.

    ETA: I would not target the pony jumper market for a resale project. Even the very best pony jumpers sell for almost nothing. Unfortunate, but true.

    She sounds interesting though. Is there any market for eventer ponies?
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Ditto what SaturdayNightLive said.... even if she was a more appealing height for pony jumpers, they just do not have a big market, and don't really draw prices that are too impressive even when they are nice. Pony jumpers are probably the last h/j market I'd buy a project to aim to resell in. Sorry! As far as what people in that market typically look for... fast, larger ponies, push button, no-stop, no-rub types. Agree with above poster, doesn't sound like a hunter prospect



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    My daughter does pony jumpers in Zone 2 which is one of the more competitive zones. Even so it is sometimes hard to fill the division. Take a look at some upcoming shows in your zone to see how many even offer pony jumpers. There are some mediums out there and some small kids but most people are looking for large ponies.

    AS SNL said the hotter the pony the harder it will be to find a buyer. The courses are technical and nobody wants to have the kid that makes people watching gasp. And the market for pony jumpers isn't that great unless you have a pony that will also hack out quietly and do other things - like event or do pony club.

    Which makes me think that may be your best bet with this pony. See if you can make her more of an all arounder so that a younger kid who is involved with pony club and deciding if he/she is going to be an eventer or a jumper can try a little bit of everything on the pony.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    975

    Default

    Thanks, thats what I needed to know.
    I'm looking for a decently quick resale.

    She was a lot of fun, really cute flashy pinto thing that is a decent mover for a pony.
    I thought she may potentially be a hunter because even though she was quite zippy with her owner, she responded well to what I did with her and she was quite a bit less zippy and pretty easy to ride for me.

    Kind of the same issues arise with her being an event pony. I think she could tackle a novice course pretty well, she's just a little too small to really be able to market her to make a little bit of a profit.
    So I guess I'll pass.

    Thanks agian!
    -Chelsie
    "Hell yes I can ride. I was riding when I fell off!"



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Location
    The Part of TN in the Wrong Time Zone
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    Maybe pony club pony?
    .אני יכול לעשות הכל על ידי אלוהים



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,458

    Default

    If it fell into your lap for free, it might be able to do some local show speed bump/puddle jumpers if it was safe for the size rider it would need. But as a reale? No market unless it can do the Ch/Ad Jumpers at 3'6" and afraid a 13.1 is going to get lost in the combinations set for horses and not handle stretching out for a spread fence within a combination.

    Most of the Pony Jumpers (and there are not many) do the regular Ch/Ad to stay sharp for the rare PJ classes. And they tend to be big Larges.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,294

    Default

    No one intentionally buys a pony jumper with the intention to flip it. (I love the division, but it's true.) You get a pony jumper when a pony doesn't jump well enough for the regular ponies but isn't quiet enough for the children's ponies.

    I love watching the pony jumpers and those kids are amazing, but 99.9% of those ponies are rejects from the other pony divisions, and 99.9% of those kids are crazy brave and talented!! The *true* pony jumpers are 3'6" and it's intimidating enough cantering down to that on a large, much less on something 13.1hh.

    If it really really REALLY isn't suitable for the hunter ring, I'd walk away -- at least from a flipping aspect. Sounds fun for pony club or eventing maybe...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,906

    Default

    Honestly, unless it's going to make up into a nice pony hunter, ponies are tough sells! I had a really cool (and good looking) large a few years ago who was a great jumper, but not a hunter. And he was a sports car. I evented him and did some jumpers, all of which he did very well in. He was a snazzy mover and, with a little practice, got quite good in the dressage ring (I would practice my prelim and one star tests on him). But he was a TOUGH sale, and not even expensive. The only reason we sold him as quickly (after a few months) as we did was because the timing worked out perfectly for a kid that was already in our barn who was ready for more horse power.

    I know he took a while to sell this past year, even with eventing and jumper miles with a kid, loads of hunting miles with me and a kid, and moved up to 3'3"-3'6" jumpers with another small adult. Even with extra mileage and proven kid mileage, he didn't sell for anymore than his family bought him for. Ponies are TOUGH unless they are hunters.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    95

    Default

    My daughter competed in Pony Jumpers in Zone 7 for 4 years. Went to Finals 3x and that was the best time she has ever had during her 12 years of showing.
    She was competing in Childrens Jumpers, Level 3 and level 4 jumpers. Her pony was champion many, many times at the A and AA shows. So if you have a talented gutsy child under the age of 17 that can ride a talented pony jumper there's more out there then just Pony Jumpers. Oh and her pony was 13.2 hands
    "An ordinary trainer cannot hear a Horse speak, a Good trainer can, a Great trainer can hear them whisper and a Top Trainer can HEAR them Think." John O'Leary



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,458

    Default

    But OP does not have a gutsy teen rider, she wants to flip it for resale and, presumably, for enough money to recoup the purchase price and some of her upkeep and labor costs.

    Thats going to be exceedingly tough in OPs area, which is my area too. Even the Green Hunter Ponies sit unless they can haul out to shows and buyers. Not to mention pack the kid.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,294

    Default

    Feeltheride -- none of us have anything bad to say about the pony jumpers -- I think we all love the division! But even you have to admit that it's not a terribly "marketable" division. Even in the most competitive zones, the pony jumpers are small, both in height and in numbers of competitors.

    A ballsy kid who can ride the snot out of a 13+hh pony that can jump the moon is something we would all get behind, but I can't honestly tell someone that intentionally buying a pony to flip as a pony jumper is a good financial decision.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2011
    Location
    Cheney, WA
    Posts
    541

    Default

    I'm finding how hard it is to market a pony! I didn't intend to sell mine for at least a few years! Especially since her dad grew till he was 7 and she just turned 5 in May. I was hoping I might be able to get a little more height on her to get her into the mediums but for now we are a small (12.1-12.2 haven't measured in a while) But life changes and things happen and we could use the money more than the pony! If she doesn't sell it's not a huge deal, but the extra money to put away would be nice! But anyhow, she is still green which is even harder to sell then just being a small! She is a little spicy so she isn't ready for a small child or beginner unless the small child is a good rider. She doesn't do anything naughty, just gets a little forward. I will admit when I bought her I did think about the resell of a small, but only a little since I figured by the time I sold her she would have a couple years of training and showing under her belt. What she does have going for her is that she is an awesome jumper and loves it! But I pretty much have to find a trainer that is willing to work with a small or has kids that can. I don't currently ride with a trainer (though I have two lined up when I have the money!) and they both have kids that I could use possibly in the future to show her if I don't get her sold for a while. In the mean time I am going to continue working her and when shows start up again get her out to as many as I can and if I can find someone to go with me I will take her out XC schooling and to the trails as well. That is what I can do to try to make her a more well rounded individual and more marketable. People kind of pushed me into getting a pony since I'm small but after this one I don't think I will try it again. If I do it will for sure be a large like I had planned! One friend was recently pushing me to buy another pony instead of a new horse and then make up the two ponies and sell them both and THEN buy a horse a year or two down the road with that money. Problem is I wanted a horse to show for myself not TWO ponies that I would have to try to sell. Couldn't get that one across to the friend either. So my advice is to be prepared to hang on to the pony for a while, because it may take a while to sell! And if it's smaller it needs a kid riding it to really be marketable!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2009
    Location
    South Central: Zone 7
    Posts
    1,960

    Default

    I did pony jumpers as a junior and showed up to 3'9", but schooled up to nearly 4'6". My pony was a top of the line large with a HUGE step. Even with winning a zone HOTY (and consistently champion or reserve at shows), she still was only worth low-mid 5 figures (someone offered us $40k) and that was way back when the market was good. Nowadays top pony jumpers peak at $20k maybe $30k but most are under $10k or $15k.

    And yes, it was a BLAST to do! I really wish there were more people interested in it. It would be awesome to have enough to offer a low and high division and go up to 4', but I don't think that would ever happen.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    382

    Default

    Interestingly enough, I am in the OP's area too and a 5yo, 14h pony "fell" into our laps this weekend. Guy driving by the barn thought we knew what we were doing and stopped and said he had a pony that liked to jump! Brought him by and low and behold, pony is 5 and quiet as a mouse, nice little jump but knows nothing but as willing as the day is long. Anyway, pony is now in an empty stall and munching hay...going to see what he is like. Love, love the ponies!



Similar Threads

  1. Pony jumpers
    By gold2012 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Nov. 12, 2012, 09:29 PM
  2. Pony Jumpers...
    By Weatherford in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: Aug. 2, 2011, 06:40 PM
  3. Qualifying for Pony Finals in Pony Jumpers
    By isis08 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Apr. 10, 2011, 09:45 PM
  4. Pony Jumpers in NorCal?
    By JJ747 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Aug. 30, 2010, 02:09 PM
  5. Pony Jumpers
    By Vindicated in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jul. 15, 2009, 04:48 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •