The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 100
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    I have earned the right to be a self righteous scrooge when I see people in "poverty" living better than those who produce.
    The people to be angry at then, are the scrooges that don't pay a living wage. Not the people who live off the system. If your option was McDonalds and you had 3 kids.... and your check barely covered day care, what the hell would you do? Turn down food stamps? Live in a shitty overcrowded trailer and leave your kids alone while you work? Or would you reach out for some assistance?

    I do some work in public housing and the people are a mixed bag. Some are leaches. Some want better. Some have tragic stories. A lot are fighting their asses off to get their kids out of poverty.

    Go meet some poor people. Talk to them, volunteer, help. See how many are aged or disabled. See how much they help each other. Then if you'd like, go be a service worker for the 1%. See how they treat you. You get to see what it is like to be invisible. But hey, we bail out their bad decisions and indiscretions.


    15 members found this post helpful.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,777

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by magnolia73 View Post
    The people to be angry at then, are the scrooges that don't pay a living wage. Not the people who live off the system. If your option was McDonalds and you had 3 kids.... and your check barely covered day care, what the hell would you do? Turn down food stamps? Live in a shitty overcrowded trailer and leave your kids alone while you work? Or would you reach out for some assistance?

    I do some work in public housing and the people are a mixed bag. Some are leaches. Some want better. Some have tragic stories. A lot are fighting their asses off to get their kids out of poverty.

    Go meet some poor people. Talk to them, volunteer, help. See how many are aged or disabled. See how much they help each other. Then if you'd like, go be a service worker for the 1%. See how they treat you. You get to see what it is like to be invisible. But hey, we bail out their bad decisions and indiscretions.
    Have worked along side of and for people of some to considerable wealth. Have worked along side of people of little wealth.
    Have learned people are good and evil regardless of their personal wealth. The money or lack thereof just magnifies the individual's traits.
    Most jobs in fast food are meant to be entry-level. It provides an opportunity for people to learn how to work. Sounds stupid, but our work mentoring kids has proved that many of them do.not.know.how.to.work. No one taught them. We often ask them to do simple chores around the farm, for 2-4 hours max, and find we spend more time and energy showing them how.

    The other thing we have learned is that too many kids believe they are 'entitled' to annual salaries of 50,000 to >150,000. Especially if they have a college degree.

    "We" have failed too many of our children in that we have not taught them how to work and given them unrealistic expectations of income.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim


    8 members found this post helpful.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    18,653

    Default

    Yeah, but Fooler, look how we set up our schools.

    If a work ethic is to be installed, it has to come at a very young age. Our school calendars aren't set up to do that. We have very short (comparatively) school days, many vacation periods during the year and a three month vacation in the summer. People come out thinking that school is the way life is. If the calendar were changed to a model that doesn't have such a long single break, the children would not forget what it's like to "be in work."

    We'd never expect a horse on that kind of schedule to be "well-trained", especially a young horse.

    Keep the kids in school from 8 to five, just like they had a job. Use the extra two hours for mandatory sports, extra curricular activities like debating or music, or remedial work or study hall with assistance available. Parents should love that, since they wouldn't have worry about what their children were doing while the parents were working.

    And don't talk about outside jobs; school should be their job.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire


    5 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,777

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    Yeah, but Fooler, look how we set up our schools.

    If a work ethic is to be installed, it has to come at a very young age. Our school calendars aren't set up to do that. We have very short (comparatively) school days, many vacation periods during the year and a three month vacation in the summer. People come out thinking that school is the way life is. If the calendar were changed to a model that doesn't have such a long single break, the children would not forget what it's like to "be in work."

    We'd never expect a horse on that kind of schedule to be "well-trained", especially a young horse.
    The school is not responsible for teaching children how to work. That is the responsibility of the parents and extended family. As in my home we learned to make our own beds and clean our rooms, then other duties around the house as we grew older and stronger. I started rolling newspapers at age 7 to help my older brothers with their newspaper routes. All of us, 5 kids, worked in our family restaurants. Our parents considered us kids as free labor

    Again I firmly believe that "we" have failed the many of next generation by not teaching them how to be productive members of society. It is always so much fun to have one of the kids around who knows how to work. We can work some, talk some and later eat a good meal while admiring all that we accomplished.
    Another 'feel good' for us is to watch the kids learn the feeling of accomplishment when they earn good grades, get into and do well at college and figure out how to do those "manly" chores. They love working along DH, learning and using the tools. FYI - DH is a major safety geek - so the kids are limited to the equipment they are around.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
    Posts
    5,961

    Default

    Good points viney and fooler. It is true so many kids don't know how to work. Our school system was originally set this way because kids DID work on the farm and were needed summers to take care of and harvest crops and after school to do the farm work. The system is really archaic.

    I think five states just passed a bill or something where they will lengthen the school day and year just to deal with this. There are so many kids who don't have good examples at home, and getting them away from that to learn a good work ethic is needed.

    Even a lot of good parents don't teach their kids very good work ethics.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2009
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    Yeah, but Fooler, look how we set up our schools.

    If a work ethic is to be installed, it has to come at a very young age. Our school calendars aren't set up to do that. We have very short (comparatively) school days, many vacation periods during the year and a three month vacation in the summer. People come out thinking that school is the way life is. If the calendar were changed to a model that doesn't have such a long single break, the children would not forget what it's like to "be in work."

    We'd never expect a horse on that kind of schedule to be "well-trained", especially a young horse.

    Keep the kids in school from 8 to five, just like they had a job. Use the extra two hours for mandatory sports, extra curricular activities like debating or music, or remedial work or study hall with assistance available. Parents should love that, since they wouldn't have worry about what their children were doing while the parents were working.

    And don't talk about outside jobs; school should be their job.
    This is the very essence of private school. And it's why many choose to go without new cars etc in order to afford that tuition bill.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,236

    Default

    A lot of people banging on keyboards at one another, losing the complexity of the problems in an apparent effort to make strawmen of the contending points of view
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    852

    Default

    I see a few problems here, the first being government waste. The govenrnment needs to run more effeciantly. The second is there are leeches out there, but there are a lot of good people to. So lets try not to throw the baby out with the bath water. Do we need some new regulations, yes. I see no issue with drug tests for people on public assistance. I am subject to random drug tests as a condition of my employment and so are lots of other people. I think this would go a long way in seperating the good from the bad.
    That said there are always going to be a**holes. Life works on a bell curve, super sweet and wonderful on one end, super evil bastards on the other, and the rest of us fall somewhere in between. We have to do the best we can to figure out how to keep the bad out of the kitty.
    Railgirl.blogspot.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,233

    Default

    I haven't read through all of these posts (and I doubt anything I write here will change anyone's mind) but in what I glanced through, almost every misconception I've heard of re: poverty has been thrown out here. I spent 4 years of college minoring in something called the Shepherd Program. It was a minor in "the study of poverty and human capability" and it was, among many things, extremely eye opening. The degree requirements included a 10 week internship program at non-profits, health clinics and government assistance programs around the country and was one of the most impacting parts of the program. I did my internship at an after-school and summer program for children ages 8-18 and learned more in those 10 weeks about the have and the have-nots of our society than I could ever learn from all the books and papers I read the rest of the program.

    1. Poverty crosses geographic and demographic boundaries. Some people are born into it, some people fall into and some people do eventually leave it.

    2. Poverty, in its chronic and persistent form, is a culture. I worked in Church Hill, Richmond, VA. For the people of that community, poverty is a way of life. Everyone they know is poor, everyone they know has children out of wedlock, and everyone they know knows at least one someone who has had run-ins with the law. Not a single child I worked with (that's over 200 kids) had ANYONE outside of our program that ever said to them, "hey, you should go to school" or "hey, did you know you could get this job?" or "hey, maybe wait till you're out of your teens to have kids of your own". When a nine year old thinks it's the norm to get pregnant at 16 and can barely write her own name, how can you blame her for not making more of her life? If all you know is the culture of poverty, how do you come to expect any more in life? Throw in horrendous schools (last I checked, reading a magazine at the front of class while your kids do "work sheets" isn't teaching), increased incidence of violent crime and zero local job market, and children of impoverished communities are set up to fail. The ones that make it fight against the system every step of the way, and in almost every instance, have a "guardian angel" type mentor that is encouraging them, making them aware of opportunities (hey, I think you can apply for this scholarship and I'm going to help you do it) and getting them "out" of the community they are in, rather than trying to change the community itself. Communities like Church Hill (or the 9th Ward of New Orleans, or Harlem, NY, etc etc) are dense concentrations of the poorest of the poor in our country, but they do not represent the majority of those in poverty.

    3. The majority of those in poverty do, in fact, work. And work hard. And are still poor. There's so much to write here but Mr. Shipler says it better, so I'll just recommend this read: http://www.amazon.com/Working-Poor-I.../dp/0375708219

    4. I know a lot of rich lazy people, and I know a lot of poor lazy people. Neither did anything to EARN the socio-economic status into which they were born and neither should be used to gauge their entire population.

    5. Federal and state government assistance programs are some of the most bureaucratically dense, inefficient systems in our country. I am fully in favor of government assistance, but not as it currently exists. Programs that provide EDUCATION, job training AND financial/food assistance, not any individual assistance alone, have a much better chance of lifting an individual or family out of poverty than handouts alone.

    The more I read and learn, the less I know. Poverty is so much more complex than any of us here could state. The only thing I can disagree with for certain is the idea that "the poor are poor because they are lazy. If they really didn't want to be poor, they would just get a job and not be poor anymore." It just isn't true.
    If it were easy, everybody would do it.

    Equi-Sport Services


    17 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2006
    Location
    wyoming
    Posts
    523

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by caballero View Post
    The only cure for poverty is to work out of it, even if it takes ten generations.

    Government benefits serve ONLY to legitimize poverty. Just how many have ever lifted themselves out of poverty based on .gov assistance?

    I sure as hell would like to know.
    Google is your friend.

    J.K Rowling and Oprah Winfrey both lived on welfare as children, at least part of the time, according to this website. It took me two seconds to find them. I haven't looked any further, but as I said, Google is your friend - as long as you don't mind seeing two sides to an issue. (Which, from your above statement, doesn't appear to be the case, since you apparently arrived at a conclusion before doing any research.)

    Liz


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Location
    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
    Posts
    740

    Default

    My DH works in Memphis, at a plant that CANNOT fill entry level jobs, which start at $12-15/hr with quite nice benefits. They have 3 plants in the Memphis metro area, all of which have the exact same problem. After about 2-3 years there, almost all employees are making $50K+.

    It is not hard or dangerous work (boring shift work, yes), all plants are on metro transportation lines (2 in decent walking distance to high poverty areas), but they do require you actually show up, unstoned, and work.

    And they cannot find workers in an area riddled with poverty, with plenty of politicians and the poor crying there are no decent-paying jobs here.

    Most can't pass the drug test (average 75%+ fail that), many outright state they are only applying in case someone checks so they don't lose their benefits.
    It is an honest-to-goodness running joke on how long new hires will last; and how much rubber they will leave on the drive while making their escape, when they realize they must work while there.

    So is it really on the nasty employers that don't pay enough to support a family?

    Or is Memphis just less of a "mixed bag", since one would think that there would be a line outside the doors every day of those who are willing to work their way out of poverty, happy to take a job with regular paychecks, health care, other benefits, vacation, 5% 401K matching, etc?

    Where are those who are willing to work to change their circumstances? I understand not all are, but where are those who will?

    This is a constant topic in this area; it's not simply DH's plants that have the problem of finding those willing to work while listening to all the cries about the high-poverty in the area.
    I really do not understand this, and haven't since we moved here 10 years ago.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    18,653

    Default

    Faybe, that's a great post. I take it you're an Oscar Lewis believer, as am I.

    I live and have for many decades in one of the poorest parts of the United States, the Mississippi Delta (which for those who don't know is NOT the Delta of the Mississippi). Our capital is Memphis. I've often described where I live as the Ethiopia of the United States. I've put in my stint with Legal Services for the poor, and I worked in the public schools immediately after they were desegregated.

    I came out thinking that the answer was intensive mentoring beginning at a very young age. In an odd way that is what good schools can provide.

    One of the points that Lewis made was that people who are trapped in a day to day struggle for existence do not see any point in planning for a better future that they don't think they will ever see. It's not overt, but it's the mindset. So those people look for things that will make them happy in the moment, not in the future. That might explain the prevalence of drugs and teen pregnancy and multiple unwed pregnancy--as well as being embedded in the culture. Here, a teenaged boy who doesn't have at least one child is NOT a MAN.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire


    4 members found this post helpful.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,844

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fooler View Post
    Have worked along side of and for people of some to considerable wealth. Have worked along side of people of little wealth.
    Have learned people are good and evil regardless of their personal wealth. The money or lack thereof just magnifies the individual's traits.
    Most jobs in fast food are meant to be entry-level. It provides an opportunity for people to learn how to work. Sounds stupid, but our work mentoring kids has proved that many of them do.not.know.how.to.work. No one taught them. We often ask them to do simple chores around the farm, for 2-4 hours max, and find we spend more time and energy showing them how.

    The other thing we have learned is that too many kids believe they are 'entitled' to annual salaries of 50,000 to >150,000. Especially if they have a college degree.

    "We" have failed too many of our children in that we have not taught them how to work and given them unrealistic expectations of income.
    They're meant to be entry level, but they're not. We're losing our manufacturing jobs and replacing them with service jobs that pay minimum wage. You can't blame it on the employees.

    I don't think it's unrealistic to expect to earn enough money for a roof over your head, food, clothing, and medical care. Bare necessities.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,844

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MoonoverMississippi View Post
    My DH works in Memphis, at a plant that CANNOT fill entry level jobs, which start at $12-15/hr with quite nice benefits. They have 3 plants in the Memphis metro area, all of which have the exact same problem. After about 2-3 years there, almost all employees are making $50K+.

    It is not hard or dangerous work (boring shift work, yes), all plants are on metro transportation lines (2 in decent walking distance to high poverty areas), but they do require you actually show up, unstoned, and work.

    And they cannot find workers in an area riddled with poverty, with plenty of politicians and the poor crying there are no decent-paying jobs here.

    Most can't pass the drug test (average 75%+ fail that), many outright state they are only applying in case someone checks so they don't lose their benefits.
    It is an honest-to-goodness running joke on how long new hires will last; and how much rubber they will leave on the drive while making their escape, when they realize they must work while there.

    So is it really on the nasty employers that don't pay enough to support a family?

    Or is Memphis just less of a "mixed bag", since one would think that there would be a line outside the doors every day of those who are willing to work their way out of poverty, happy to take a job with regular paychecks, health care, other benefits, vacation, 5% 401K matching, etc?

    Where are those who are willing to work to change their circumstances? I understand not all are, but where are those who will?

    This is a constant topic in this area; it's not simply DH's plants that have the problem of finding those willing to work while listening to all the cries about the high-poverty in the area.
    I really do not understand this, and haven't since we moved here 10 years ago.
    I have to say, I find that very hard to believe. My husband ran manufacturing plants in Baltimore, San Antonio and Nebraska, never had problems finding workers. He had some turnover sure, some drug problems, yes, but he always had workers. Has your husband tried going into the high schools for internships that can turn into full time jobs? Is there any training program for upward mobility?
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,233

    Default

    Viney, I struggled with Lewis through all of my coursework, but definitely came to terms with him after my experiences in Richmond. And I 110% agree with this:

    I came out thinking that the answer was intensive mentoring beginning at a very young age. In an odd way that is what good schools can provide.
    Sadly, that system depends on dynamic and engaging individual teachers. I know many, but for every outstanding educator I know, I've met three more who weren't qualified to teach the janitors to sweep, never mind kids to read and write and aspire to things beyond. Teachers, to me, are on par with (and in most ways surpass) physicians, lawyers and other graduate professionals in their importance to society, but until society recognizes them as such (and educates and pays them accordingly), the profession won't attract enough of the individuals it so desperately needs to change the education system.
    If it were easy, everybody would do it.

    Equi-Sport Services


    5 members found this post helpful.

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,075

    Default

    Is OP saying that the families actually physically get hold of that amount of money? Because when I worked (I had a fellowship, paid for by the U.S. government) with the poor, most of the cost was spent in administration, i.e., people who were paid to get money to the poor. By the time that the working poor got any money, a lot of salaries had been paid to a lot of administrators.

    I always said back then that it would be better to just hand the cash to poor people and let them spend it as they wished, instead of having just a little trickle down to them. But no, everyone working with the poor said that the poor wouldn't make the right choices of how to spend the money. So most of it went to salaries and not for salaries for the poor.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,844

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    Yeah, but Fooler, look how we set up our schools.

    If a work ethic is to be installed, it has to come at a very young age. Our school calendars aren't set up to do that. We have very short (comparatively) school days, many vacation periods during the year and a three month vacation in the summer. People come out thinking that school is the way life is. If the calendar were changed to a model that doesn't have such a long single break, the children would not forget what it's like to "be in work."

    We'd never expect a horse on that kind of schedule to be "well-trained", especially a young horse.

    Keep the kids in school from 8 to five, just like they had a job. Use the extra two hours for mandatory sports, extra curricular activities like debating or music, or remedial work or study hall with assistance available. Parents should love that, since they wouldn't have worry about what their children were doing while the parents were working.

    And don't talk about outside jobs; school should be their job.
    That's actually a wonderful idea. My daughter's school started at 8:00, they had mandatory sports after school (or they had to take a PE class 3 to 5 days a week after school) until 5:30 or 6:00. No time to get in trouble, and a great smorgasbord of sports to try. Theater practice at night if one was so inclined.

    But, that takes money. Something that many of those who complain about the poor being lazy don't want to spend on education.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    The other thing we have learned is that too many kids believe they are 'entitled' to annual salaries of 50,000 to >150,000. Especially if they have a college degree.
    They don't get them. They get $35,000 a year jobs and are expected to be 60-80 hour a week employees, on call 24/7. They may or may not afford their student loan debt.

    I am aghast at what employers want out of a $40,000 a year employee in terms of skill set. I myself am looking for a job. I applied for one... they can't fill it. The pay is $35,000 a year. For someone to guide real estate investment decisions(qualified). Execute pro-formas (qualified). Estimate the cost of repairs on homes (unqualified). Unwilling to train. They bitch that no one is qualified, but ask for 3 skill sets that are somewhat unique. They want a combo realtor/finance/handyman.

    I just missed out on a marketing job. Real estate skills? check. 5 years experience? check. Graphic design? check. Commercial real estate? check. Admin skills? check. Oopsie, not a paralegal. The pay? $40,000. Still unfilled. It is critical to have all those skills, but they don't want to train in any one of them.

    I can't imagine actually moving out of the service industry when the qualifications for the next step up have become so involved. Every employer wants the 17H bay, 8 year old packer than can do the hunters, trail ride, vets clean and they want to pay $5000 for it. Then they bitch when they can't find it.

    Then you have the "gotta have X degree". That company is special- they need someone with a degree in finance. I apply. No degree in finance. So since they can't find someone in finance with the requisite experience, they farm the work out to you guess it.... ME. But they can't hire me- no finance degree, so not qualified. But they'll contract to my company for a higher rate (and no one with finance skills on board).

    Oh yeah, and the drug testing bull shit. Yeah, I heard that from the poultry processors. If my job was slaughtering chickens all day, I might want to go home and smoke dope to forget that I stand all day in a fridge cutting up chickens for $7 an hour. Maybe it is not so critical they remain drug free. Shit, the bankers shovel coke in their noses. OK for them and fine when they gamble on bad mortgages.... we'll bail 'em out. But god forbid some poor laborer smoke a little pot to ease their day.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,844

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by faybe View Post
    Viney, I struggled with Lewis through all of my coursework, but definitely came to terms with him after my experiences in Richmond. And I 110% agree with this:



    Sadly, that system depends on dynamic and engaging individual teachers. I know many, but for every outstanding educator I know, I've met three more who weren't qualified to teach the janitors to sweep, never mind kids to read and write and aspire to things beyond. Teachers, to me, are on par with (and in most ways surpass) physicians, lawyers and other graduate professionals in their importance to society, but until society recognizes them as such (and educates and pays them accordingly), the profession won't attract enough of the individuals it so desperately needs to change the education system.
    Absolutely. Instead of taking teachers from the bottom third of their class, they should come from the top. And they should be paid a salary that reflects the professionals they are (or could be with the right higher ed programs and mentoring). Take a look at Finland.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Location
    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
    Posts
    740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I have to say, I find that very hard to believe. My husband ran manufacturing plants in Baltimore, San Antonio and Nebraska, never had problems finding workers. He had some turnover sure, some drug problems, yes, but he always had workers. Has your husband tried going into the high schools for internships that can turn into full time jobs? Is there any training program for upward mobility?
    We moved from CO, and I have lived in other states and have not come across this attitude/issue to this level before, either.

    This company is world-wide including many plants in many other states, most of which do not have any of these issues finding help. It really is this area and the environment here. They have sent in plenty of people from HQ to figure out how to solve this; so far the solution is just keep hiring and running though them, hoping one or two here and there will stay.

    They have tried working with local schools, which is difficult, as it is shift work, and the local school system (read up on Memphis and the county schools if you want an interesting eye-opener) is pushing a "Every Child College Ready" type program, and is not interested in the helping kids with the "trades".

    Tried local programs with community leaders to help poverty-stricken teens; they have only a few that made it through that program and remained.
    A couple of those are now family friends, and their insights are very disheartening indeed; it is very much an attitude in many local areas to "get it over on the man", and a source of pride of not having to "slave" at a real job. Peer pressure is an issue; not working is "cool", and actually working means you get robbed and at minimum constantly hit up for $$ since you "sold out" and they know you have more than them.

    Tried with "welfare to work" type programs, and that was an unbelievable mess; lots of folks expecting to work a couple hours a couple times a week, calling out on their second day, using no transportation as an excuse not to come to work while refusing rides, you name it. Not one person from that made it more than a month before just up and quitting (Yes, even after the above they tried to work with the people, "training" them of what a real job entails, like showing up, working and not walking off after 10 minutes, etc.).

    This employer PUSHES upward mobility and promoting from within and has a great amount of training classes and help for those who want a promotion to the next level. If you work hard and try, you WILL be promoted (sometimes even undeserved, IMO), and the promotions all have monetary components; no busting your rear for just a higher title. And if you want to go "all the way", quite a few people have been promoted into upper management and to HQ jobs.

    I really don't get what it is about this area where jobs go begging while people would rather fuss about how bad it is rather than do something.
    And I'm not saying it is everywhere, but this region honestly amazes me; it often seems to be a way of life that few are willing to give up??


    3 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Horses and apparent vow of poverty :)
    By lilitiger2 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: May. 27, 2012, 09:40 PM
  2. Statistic?
    By maggie32 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sep. 29, 2011, 12:22 PM
  3. Horses: Vow of Poverty or Stupidity?
    By elizuhowell in forum Off Course
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Feb. 22, 2010, 08:01 PM
  4. NC Peeps - Horrible Rain Statistic
    By EqTrainer in forum Off Course
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: Dec. 19, 2009, 02:52 PM
  5. Replies: 20
    Last Post: Nov. 25, 2009, 03:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness