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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2012
    Posts
    57

    Default Wood Chewing

    What product do you recommend for wood fences to inhibit chewing? I know that nothing is likely going to work 100%, but I've got to try something before these beavers, er, horses, chew their way to the next county!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2002
    Location
    Idaho USA
    Posts
    1,885

    Default

    Replacing the wood fence with a non edible fence is the only thing we have found to work!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    269

    Default

    Strand of hot wire on top board
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2012
    Location
    Coastal NC
    Posts
    982

    Default

    For small areas the McNasty spray works well. Just don't inhale it or get it in your eyes as it really is nasty and burns. My mare actually like the Farnam spray and would lick it off the wood.

    Farnam also markets a pelleted supplement (Quitt Chew) they claim helps stop wood chewing.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2008
    Posts
    333

    Default

    I have the same dilemma. i have a horse on stall rest and am worried that his wood eating is going to progress to cribbing. I am trying dfferent things to keep him entertained during the day. In the interim I am trying "cribhalt" but have found the effects dont last too long.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
    Location
    NOVA
    Posts
    93

    Default

    I've resorted to hand dish washing liquid. It's cheap, sticks on really well, and the horses hate it. Dawn is what I've used in the past...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2003
    Location
    Southern MD
    Posts
    1,448



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,067

    Default

    Andylover - you may consider giving your stall bound horse ulcergard. My mare ate wood when her ulcers flare up & being on stall rest with limited turnout can cause ulcers.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,333

    Default

    Cribox and hot wire.

    Cribox- is not user friendly to apply, but stopped my cribber from cribbing on the fence. Because it worked for cribbing, I imagine it will work for chewing. I slathered his entire paddock with cribox over a few days. Good times.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    341

    Default

    Irish Spring soap, although you do have to keep applying. My horse loved the "step chew" paint on product, so that did not work for us!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Good luck. One of mine went through a period of gnawing the boards dividing their run-in. The soap kind of worked, but not for long, and the Quitt didn't do much. I gave him a powdered Probiotic on his feed and that seemd to work. Coincidence, I don't know, but I kept him on it for a few months and he's been good since. Knock on wood. Haha.

    If they are all doing it, hot wire. You can spend a lot of time soaping/painting fence if you have a lot of it.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Location
    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    4,380

    Default

    Our paddocks are hot wired but the damned things still go in between the wire and above and below it to get a chew in ...

    The only thing Ive found that works and is cheap / easy to apply, is either Hooflex or a liquid hoof dressing. They hate it, it lasts forever, doesnt wash off in the rain and snow and Ive found the areas I painted last year they still avoid this year

    Good luck!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Saco, Maine
    Posts
    4,715

    Default

    I put on some Chew Stop laced with red pepper (cayenne) yesterday and it stopped them-lots of sneezing...The best I've found is RapLast but don't breathe it nor get it in your eyes!
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,844

    Default

    I'd try treating the ulcers. It's cheaper in the long run and better for the horse. In the barn, for chewing because of boredom, Vicks VaporRub.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I use chew stop, comes in a yellow paint can or a smaller square can. You have to use the black/brown color. It is like tar almost and messy, but it works. You have to reapply about once a month. It sticks in your hair like marshmellows. If your horse can lean over the fence then the stuff will get on their necks. But it works great. I use a paint brush or roller brush to put it on. Do not get the clear stuff, it does not last nearly as long and it soaks into the wood more, so it is less effective.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,273

    Default

    I just took a look at the "Quitt" supplement. Smartpak sells it. It has good reviews. Basically it's just a vit/min supp in an alfalfa pellet. I would think any additional vit/min would work; there's tons to choose from. Maybe try adding one in?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,301

    Default

    Have you got any "safe" kind of brush you can trim to put in their paddocks? Honeysuckle is a good one for our location, pesky invasive, needs trimming to keep my fences cleaned out. Or some new cut tree logs like live willow, Ash, other safe woods?

    I have found that our horses seem to have a "need to chew wood" when winter comes. May be part of being a horse, when winter forage would be brush instead of grasses in snow or cold times. We toss some stuff into a small pile in the paddocks, where horse can choose to chew or not. They like the cut wood better than chewing on stuff that we have to pay to repair, wood posts, stall walls, BARN SIDING.

    There isn't much left of a brush pile, even HUGE ones, when the horses get done with it in spring. They all have PLENTY of hay to eat, will walk away to chew brush pile offerings.

    Deer locally change what they eat in winter, so folks tossing them hay bales are usually wasting their money and hay, because deer stomach is not set to digest that kind of food in winter. Deer around us eat brush in winter, not grasses. So horses' seasonal choice of foods changing that way is quite logical if you think about it. Horses having round hooves to paw with, clear snow, gives them an advantage over the split hooved animals trying to eat in winter snow depths.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2012
    Location
    Moved South from North Pole
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Quitt. It goes in the horse not on the fence.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2012
    Location
    Moved South from North Pole
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow36 View Post
    I just took a look at the "Quitt" supplement. Smartpak sells it. It has good reviews. Basically it's just a vit/min supp in an alfalfa pellet. I would think any additional vit/min would work; there's tons to choose from. Maybe try adding one in?
    It works. Our owner uses it when we chew wood. Only takes a few days for us to quit when we eat those Quitt pellets.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2010
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quarterhorse4me View Post
    For small areas the McNasty spray works well. Just don't inhale it or get it in your eyes as it really is nasty and burns. My mare actually like the Farnam spray and would lick it off the wood.

    Farnam also markets a pelleted supplement (Quitt Chew) they claim helps stop wood chewing.
    I tried the Farnum No-Chew yesterday for this very same problem, and my gelding also liked it! I could see he had increased his chewing since I applied it. The barn is going to apply some really icky stuff today that seems to work. It's an anti-cribbing product, not sure which one, but none of the horses like it.



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