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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    594

    Default gun safety

    What I want to know is when having a gun makes me and my family safer. How much training? Etc.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    3,047

    Default

    Well, I'm an okay shot with a handgun, as long as the target is decent sized and stationary. But it would take an awful lot more than occasionally shooting at a range for me to feel comfortable shooting a moving, armed person in a building full of people. Like years of military experience and intensive study of blueprints and specialized weaponry more.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3

    Default

    Take the NRA safety class. Even juniors are welcome. Don't know how old your kids are, but there was a 9 year old in the class I took this year - and she was darn good with a .22.

    Practice. Practice. Practice. That's what it comes down to. Get as familiar with your weapon as possible. That means practice drawing it from a holster. Shooting in different positions - kneeling, standing, sitting. Cleaning it and getting familiar with all the parts. Shoot more. Join a good range and take some lessons from a pro if possible.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    14,888

    Default

    IMO, it's a huge problem that most folks aren't taught gun safety and respect.

    I'm not a gunner, but my daddy was. This was the dude who would own guns, teach his kids to shoot (while drinking beer... don't ask), but go Tasmanian Devil on you if you pointed anything-- a toy gun, a stick, your hand at something imitating a gun-- at a living thing. His deal was that if you did that, you meant to kill what you were pointing at.

    Fine by him so long as you were committed to killing it and not just screwing around like a douchebag. You got no pass just because you were a 10-year-old kid, by the way.

    So gun safety appears to me to be only half of the equation. The other half is the consequences of shooting at living things. How people miss this or disregard it, I just can't fathom.

    A few simple question suffice:

    If you killed it only half way would you be willing to finish the job, point blank?

    If you killed a person, would you be willing to spend the rest of your life in jail for that? Face their family members in person and apologize (or explain/justify as you might)?

    If you thought that shooting was justified, would you be willing to be on the receiving end of someone else's gun and logic?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    34

    Default

    I remember taking gun training as an 11-year-old. My mother and father required all the kids to take it (we are a huge hunting family). Having done so, I am not entirely sure what my parents paid for it. However, I wish more people would take a similar course.

    The course went through how to identify different firearms, the ammo used, and the different actions (so basically, I can look at almost any typical firearm and know the correct way to use it). We went through proper safety techniques when loading the gun, using the different safes on different guns (very important as not all guns have the same safes and some are "safer" than others), cleaning, and storing guns.

    After that we were taught how to properly hold a rifle, shotgun, and handgun both at the ready and while at rest. How to hold a rifle when walking alone vs walking in with a group of people. How to crawl under a fence and climb a tree safely with a gun in hand (once again while alone and when in a group). When to shoot and when not to shoot was also a huge thing (ex. don't shoot towards movement, sound...ONLY shoot if you can see what you are shooting at and have a CLEAR shot!) They even went through why you shouldn't shoot towards certain areas both for the obvious reasons such as housing (i.e. rocky areas and water due to the risk of ricochets)

    ONLY AFTER we did all that did we actually get a chance to fire each type of weapon. We were taught how to shoot standing, sitting, kneeling, and laying down and by both open-sight and through a scope. We started at shooting things from 20 yards all the way up to 100 yards with rifles and learned how to shoot clay pigeons with a shotgun.

    At the end of the course, we had to complete a test with a written portion and a practical portion involving ALL the aspects we covered.

    I would HIGHLY recommend you take a firearms safety class. Coming from someone who comes from a community where we often have to hunt for food, you never know when you will need it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    16,650

    Default

    Well it just doesn't make you safer. Some statistics:

    A gun in the home increases the chances of being killed by a firearm by 72%.

    A gun in the home triples the risk of a homicide.

    A gun in the home is 22 times more likely to be used in a suicide, a homicide or an accident than in self defense.

    A gun in the home increases the likelihood of suicide by 5 times.

    An abused woman is 6 times more likely to be murdered if there is a gun in the home.

    A gun in the home is responsible for the vast majority of children's deaths by gunshot.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2012
    Posts
    689

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Well it just doesn't make you safer. Some statistics:

    A gun in the home increases the chances of being killed by a firearm by 72%.

    A gun in the home triples the risk of a homicide.

    A gun in the home is 22 times more likely to be used in a suicide, a homicide or an accident than in self defense.

    A gun in the home increases the likelihood of suicide by 5 times.

    An abused woman is 6 times more likely to be murdered if there is a gun in the home.

    A gun in the home is responsible for the vast majority of children's deaths by gunshot.
    Ignore all this. Anyone who knows basic analytical mathematics can make statistics say whatever they want.

    The one thing that is almost always missing from this discussion is mindset. You must have the mindset that you will not be a victim, nor will you allows yours to be, at any cost including your life.

    How much training? There is never enough. That is why those who are serious about this train constantly. They use every avenue available, from training courses given by people whose livelihood is fighting with weapons, to competing in sports that emphasize the tactical/martial use of firearms, to learning how to use their own body as a weapon.

    But all that training is useless if you have not made up your mind to fight to the very end even against odds that seem futile.

    Using firearms to fight is drastically different than what the NRA and other basic training organizations teach. And you don't need a military background to learn this stuff. There are plenty of current and former policemen and soldiers making a living teaching their fellow citizens the skills they have learned in battle.

    You just have to know where to look.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,344

    Default

    I think that anyone who wants to have a gun in the house needs to understand gun safety, know how to take care of the gun AND be able to shoot.

    I grew up with guns and a healthy respect for them.

    I do not currently have a gun in my home though I wish I did to be honest.

    I think that if you're not comfortable with a gun, it has no business in your home--it can just make things worse. If you're not trained and prepared to use it correctly, you have a higher liklihood of having it used against you.

    I have big dogs. I figure that if someone tries to break in, they MUST have a gun else they wouldn't challenge the dogs. I'll be bailing out the back window thank you.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2007
    Location
    (throw dart at map) NC!
    Posts
    4,465

    Default

    Do not ignore. Facts are facts. Numbers don't lie, they are what they are. You might think you have the "killer" mindset but you'll never know until you are in that exact situation, and hopefully you won't kill your husband/wife/significant other/child/house guest/neighbor because your shot went through the wall, etc. And the numbers say that most law-abiding, solid citizens don't have killer instincts, even in the heat of the moment (thank god, but the downside is that they are much more likely to have the gun taken away and used on them).

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Well it just doesn't make you safer. Some statistics:

    A gun in the home increases the chances of being killed by a firearm by 72%.

    A gun in the home triples the risk of a homicide.

    A gun in the home is 22 times more likely to be used in a suicide, a homicide or an accident than in self defense.

    A gun in the home increases the likelihood of suicide by 5 times.

    An abused woman is 6 times more likely to be murdered if there is a gun in the home.

    A gun in the home is responsible for the vast majority of children's deaths by gunshot.
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2012
    Posts
    689

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Lu View Post
    Do not ignore. Facts are facts. Numbers don't lie, they are what they are. You might think you have the "killer" mindset but you'll never know until you are in that exact situation, and hopefully you won't kill your husband/wife/significant other/child/house guest/neighbor because your shot went through the wall, etc. And the numbers say that most law-abiding, solid citizens don't have killer instincts, even in the heat of the moment (thank god, but the downside is that they are much more likely to have the gun taken away and used on them).
    You know nothing about me.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    I have a dear friend whose husband had an accident with his gun in their home. One of their pets were killed.

    One of their pets. Think about that. All of the stars aligned so that the pet was where the bullet went. What are the odds?

    I dont have a gun, in spite of having owned them as a child, after hunting extensively with guns, after sitting in my bedroom as a 13 year old, loaded shotgun pointed at the door, because there was someone outside trying to figure out how to get in the house.

    I am not lucky. It wouldnt be a pet.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,344

    Default

    There was a time a few years ago when I couldn't sleep without a gun. I didn't want to touch it. I was lucky that my ex was willing to stay with me and protect me. We were flat out told we were at risk by the police. He was very well trained (teaches gun safety actually). He loaded the gun with special bullets so we probably wouldn't kill the person, but I could. not. sleep. without him and that gun. And when he couldn't stay, the gun did. There is a time and place.

    Then the cops told me to leave the state for awhile. So I did.

    People shouldn't have to leave their homes to stay safe.

    I would've used a gun then, I'd use one now.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2011
    Posts
    856

    Default

    Gun safety=Safe sex



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2007
    Location
    (throw dart at map) NC!
    Posts
    4,465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by caballero View Post
    You know nothing about me.
    No, I do not know you. The statistics address/describe the average American, as did my post.
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    594

    Default

    I don't hate guns, but from what I have read ,just owning a gun isn't enough. It takes training - ongoing, if effectiveness is desired.
    So, what is your training regiman? And how much training do you consider necessary for real life effectiveness.
    Be warned, IMO a 3 day training weekend is never enoughfor real understanding


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2005
    Posts
    494

    Default

    Shooting is a perishable skill, and needs to be kept up and practiced regularly. I highly recommend taking a class, and then maintaining the skill set at a local range.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    6,575

    Default

    There are professional classes. I was in the military and learned rifles, etc there, then I got proficient with handguns thanks to dating an ex-special forces cop.

    The best way to learn to back a big trailer is from retired firemen and truckers. You can learn gun safety and proficiency from retired cops and vets.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Well it just doesn't make you safer. Some statistics:

    A gun in the home increases the chances of being killed by a firearm by 72%.

    A gun in the home triples the risk of a homicide.

    A gun in the home is 22 times more likely to be used in a suicide, a homicide or an accident than in self defense.

    A gun in the home increases the likelihood of suicide by 5 times.

    An abused woman is 6 times more likely to be murdered if there is a gun in the home.

    A gun in the home is responsible for the vast majority of children's deaths by gunshot.
    Liberal propaganda.

    Sorry.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    804

    Default

    We are a gun family. I grew up with guns, my DH grew up with guns. My 14 yr old step daughter got her first rifle last year and my dad gave my 11 yr old son his first gun (which was my dads first gun) this year for christmas. These guns stay locked in the safe with trigger locks on them.
    We preach saftey! They started out with bb guns, Don't EVER point it at anyone! Know your target and what is beyond it, understand how to operate it, DO NOT put your finger on the trigger until you are ready to fire. They are required to clean their guns, know how to take them apart, understand how the safteys work etc. They shoot at the range and are taught range saftey (DH dad was a range saftey officer in the military but this is pretty basic stuff)
    We always stress that the wrath of all things holy and most things unholy will come upon them should they even touch any weapon without our permission. This includes friends, neighbors etc.
    They just think it is normal, there is no OMG its a gun, neat lets play with it. We have taken the mystery out of it.
    That said, I don't think you can have enough training. We practice with our guns, we do hunt and I love trap shooting but neither I nor DH are cocky enough to think that we can not learn something from trained people and do try and attend a class now and then.
    Here are some pics.
    At the range http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/p...type=3&theater
    Cleaning the guns
    http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/p...type=3&theater

    http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/p...type=3&theater



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    Best experience I had with firearms was volunteering with my local PD, getting trained to shoot from the same guys who trained the officers, doing practice in the simulator, then going on exercises with the SWAT team. It's one thing to shoot a stationary target, but a completely different thing to have to shoot in a high pressure situation. Granted, in my case, they were exercises, not the real thing, but there was considerably more pressure than trying to hit a target that doesn't move. It was an unconventional way to pursue weapons training, but very, very valuable.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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