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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2004
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    N. TX...just N.East of paradise...
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    Default Slant load with head at the passenger side of trailer?

    Do these have a particular name? I am looking at a trailer online, and the entry is the LEFT side of rear, and dropdowns are on the RIGHT side of trailer. Have asked what config it is, no answer yet.

    I do NOT think it's a 'reverse slant'; I believe the heads still go forward, just the opposite of the normal slants.

    What are these called in ' trailer speak'?

    How do they compare as far as ride and comfort? I'd look it up if I knew what to call it
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2011
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    WNC
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    Default

    They ARE called Reverse Slant; meaning it slants to the "right" (passenger side) instead of the "normal" slant to the left. The angle is the "reverse" of the normal.

    My friend has one that she loves; she ordered hers before I knew her and I'm not really sure why she preferred that style. My horse has traveled on hers many times and has never had a problem even though my own slant is "normal." I will say that my friend's horse always hesitates at getting on mine, like he's a little confused.

    I believe that "regular" slants are more commonplace because you typically want the heaviest part of the load toward the crown (not the edge) of the road; and of course the front of the horse is heavier. I don't really know if it makes a difference if you're not hauling a big bunch of horses.
    Last edited by GotMyPony; Dec. 28, 2012 at 04:10 PM. Reason: clarification
    It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.



  3. #3
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    May. 21, 2004
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    Default

    I thought a true 'reverse slant' was like what the Turnbows offer; where the horse's head faces the curb side AND it's pointing toward the back, not the front, like this trailer appears to load them.
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2012
    Posts
    113

    Default

    OP, you're right; a reverse slant has the horses riding backward.

    I don't know what you'd call the trailer you've found, but I don't think the horses would mind that they're facing the passenger side rather than driver side. Only issue could be that when you approach them in this trailer you're coming from the 'off' side. If it starts out as an issue you could train them out of it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2003
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    498

    Default

    I have always called that a ditch side slant - almost always order my goosenecks DS slant, it allows the short wall to be on the ditch side, this allows the dress door to be on the short side, which allows for better use of the dressing room because the long wall is not broken up by the dress door - you have your escape door on the ditch side so your horses are facing away from traffic, in an emergency or just for access this made more sense to me - on living quarters - camp ground hook ups are usually on the road side so it makes sense to have the dress door on the ditch side where the "picnic" area is - most slants are built to the road side because that is the way it has ( almost ) always been done / horses are led from the left - so, if you get a ditch side slant you should be able to lead your horse from the right / off side.... Of course I am happy to build road side slants if clients prefer!
    Risa
    www.happytrailstrailers.com
    www.balancedridetrailers.com
    www.sterlinghorsetrailers.com ( coming soon! )


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2004
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    Default

    I'm surprised there isn't a 'formal' name for it...I guess ditch or curb side would work.

    Bummer on the trailer I saw, no collapsible rear tack. That's a MUST in my have list. I'd have been willing to try ditch side if not for that....sigh...
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2006
    Location
    Maben, MS
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    Default

    I have a 2001 3-H Hawk like this - I call it a right-handed slant since I haven't heard any kind of formal name for it.

    I got it used. It has a weekender - people door on the passenger side. Horse drop-down doors on the passenger side. It does have a collapsable rear tack, which I don't love but it's doable.

    I haven't had any problems loading horses that are used to left-handed slants or straight-loads on it.



  8. #8
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    May. 21, 2004
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    Boomer, why don't you love your collapsible tack? I find it essential in case I have a bad loader, an accident or just need to open the whole space up for whatever....I don't like being restricted by structure if I don't have to be...
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2006
    Location
    Maben, MS
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melelio View Post
    Boomer, why don't you love your collapsible tack? I find it essential in case I have a bad loader, an accident or just need to open the whole space up for whatever....I don't like being restricted by structure if I don't have to be...
    Mainly because if I put saddles on the racks I have to make sure they are well anchored - all the bouncing back there makes them "jump" off their racks. My gelding likes to pee in the trailer and it tends to find it's way under the collapsible wall getting anything on the floor a little wet. Although I put shavings down somehow it seems to make it to the back. In my trailer, if I collapse the tack, there is no butt bar to put up across the back of the trailer.

    I have to agree I really would not like it if it wasn't collapsible.

    I would love a trailer with a mid-tack, but my budget makes me buy used, so the trailer I got was the best in my price range with a good ratio of plus to minus



  10. #10
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    Default

    Ah, I see. I agree it's a pain to have them rattle off. Maybe incorporate some bungee ties somehow?

    I'd think they'd fall off a mid tack, too, really. I've never had one-a those so can't tell you
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.



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