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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Posts
    638

    Default Looking for solutions for a temporary arena fence

    Hi there,
    I'm looking to set up a temporary arena of about 80 by 150 feet and need some fencing ideas. It needs to be about 30" high and safe for regular use. I've looked at setting it up with cavaletti stackers and rails, but the stackers are very expensive for a pair, and we'd need quite a few. The cost of the rails wouldn't be an issue. We have also considered standards with poles, but are worried about the stability of a long run of standards all held together with poles, and the safety of the cup and pins in the event of a fall.
    The fencing would be placed inside a larger arena to divide it into two smaller arenas, and would need to be moved for arena maintenance or to change the configuration of the arena for events.
    Any ideas would be welcome! Thanks!
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,262

    Default

    Is it just for more of a visual barrier to keep riders off of one side, or do you use it for turnout and need it to be a secure barrier?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2008
    Posts
    118

    Default

    2" electric tape makes a wonderful arena. forgiving and pretty.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    You might check out some "crowd control equipment" catalogs. For instance you could use something like this-- would be about $3500 to do 460ft, and they look safe (might need to sandbag the bases to keep from blowing down?).
    Or just do stanchions and plastic chain: These ones have bases that you can fill with water to weight them down. You could do the 460ft for less than $1200. And you can get plastic chains to match your barn colors, which might look nice.


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Posts
    638

    Default

    Thanks for the replies so far. It would only be for riding in, so more of a visual barrier, but the riders are beginners and might very well bump into whatever the fence is made of. I should also add that the area is dragged regularly, so the fence uprights will be hit by he tractor. They either need to be cheap enough to be replaced when that happens or sturdy enough to take it.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2001
    Location
    Nashville, TN USA
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    use the fiberglass step-in post from TSC and 2" electric tape for high visibility. I use it here and it is great for setting up a temp riding ring. During the summer, I usually put up 3-4 60' "round pens next to each other for my campers to ride in. The horses do not run into or over the perimeter.


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 17, 2012
    Posts
    120

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nashfad View Post
    use the fiberglass step-in post from TSC and 2" electric tape for high visibility. I use it here and it is great for setting up a temp riding ring. During the summer, I usually put up 3-4 60' "round pens next to each other for my campers to ride in. The horses do not run into or over the perimeter.
    this sounds good; a picture of this would be nice.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Posts
    638

    Default

    The step in posts and tape sound like a good option. Do you feel like it's pretty safe if someone were to fall into it, or a horse were to go through it?
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,945

    Default

    Step in posts and tape make me think of a couple of possible issues. One is a kid (since you mention novice riders and I'm thinking smaller horses or perhaps ponies) might get a foot caught in the tape...I see tape trailing after them like toilet paper on a shoe and that could get ugly.

    Another thought is that I would not be keen on punching holes with step in poles across MY arena. I suspect that would not be a good thing for the base. I'd at least want to ask my footing guy before I did it. Assuming that the division is temporary as you say and that I'd want to keep the whole arena intact for other times. Especially considering you'd be putting it up, taking it down, putting back up...etc...you'd be making new holes all the time. Just not sure that would be a good plan.

    I wonder if a fence like they build on rocky land (with criss cross posts that sit on top of the ground rather than dug in) would work?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,318

    Default

    If you just need a visual barrier, I would just put the poles right on the ground.

    You can use blocks and save on them by lifting only one end of each pole, if you don't want them on the ground.

    You can elect, when using poles, not to fill in every foot, but to do corners and key places on the side.

    CDS has these neat pylons which are used by many shows locally: http://california-dressage.org/html/shop_here.htm
    They're very nice but probably more than you wanted to spend.

    Nothing wrong with standards and poles either. They're generally designed to be okay to fall on (not that it's enjoyable!) and if that's what you have and you want the poles off the ground, I would not hesitate to use them. If you're worried about exposed pins, there are several newer jump cup designs that don't use pins and have fewer exposed pointy bits. This one is compatible with a normal 'old school' drilled standard: http://www.paperchasefarms.com/Jumps.html
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2001
    Location
    Nashville, TN USA
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    You guys totally kill me. The tape is not loose so that someone can get their foot caught in it. The tape is approx 2 1/2 ft off the ground and pulled snug. The holes made by the step in post are approx 1/2" in diameter and quickly disappear when the perimeter is moved. Would I poke holes in an all weather footing arena, no. I use these in the large flat grassy areas of my place where the drainage is good. I have used this system for over 3 yrs successfully. Even green horses being lunged in it have respected the tape and not run through it. BTW, if a horse will run through a barrier, go back and start over the training.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2001
    Location
    Nashville, TN USA
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    1,159

    Default

    rtph, if I knew how to upload a pic here, I'd do that. I have found this perimeter system to be very safe.


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
    Location
    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
    Posts
    527

    Default

    I did this same thing when I first started to teach beginners. What I did was take small buckets, PVC posts and concrete to make a series of moveable posts. I wish I had a picture, it'd be easier than describing it. But I'll try.

    I got two sizes of PVC piping from Lowes. The smaller ones, I bought enough to be my upright posts. The larger, I got just a slight bit bigger than the post ones. The larger ones I cut into pieces just tall enough to stick up out of my buckets two or three inches. I put the PVC pieces in the buckets and poured in my mixed cement. When it dried, I could carry my buckets by the handle, line them up where I wanted, then put the tall PVC posts in. I needed to be able to easily change the size of my kidi-pen as we called it. For little little kids, they got a very small round pen where I could reach them in just 3 or 4 strides, but for the advanced beginners, I needed to be able to divide my ring in half just to "contain" them when others were in the ring. What I did was drill holes thru the PVC post at whatever height I wanted my "rails" at. Then I tied a loop of bale twine thru the drilled holes. I cut electric tape to be about 10 feet long, and stuck a double end snap at each end to snap to the bale twine in the PVC posts. I figured, if TSHTF for any reason, it'd be easier to break/unsnap just a section. It worked great for me for the few years that I needed it.

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow


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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    4,945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nashfad View Post
    You guys totally kill me. The tape is not loose so that someone can get their foot caught in it. The tape is approx 2 1/2 ft off the ground and pulled snug. The holes made by the step in post are approx 1/2" in diameter and quickly disappear when the perimeter is moved. Would I poke holes in an all weather footing arena, no. I use these in the large flat grassy areas of my place where the drainage is good. I have used this system for over 3 yrs successfully. Even green horses being lunged in it have respected the tape and not run through it. BTW, if a horse will run through a barrier, go back and start over the training.
    Please don't die. It isn't worth it!

    Tape loose or taut, those tenp posts IME, come out of the ground super easy, so if you get anything to pull on the tape, it can all come out. My Horseguard tape of my paddocks is not loose, yet I've had a horse get something caught and pop pop pop, it pulled the insulators off the posts and tape went with him. Had those been temp posts, they would have gone too.

    Yep, your base and footing will vary, and how you choose to treat it is up to you. I got to thinking later, there is NO WAY in some places that you could step in posts if the base is pretty firm. Unless you weigh 300 lbs and have posts that can handle it!

    I'm trying to remember how they split rings for shows around here, but it has been so long, I can't recall. The posts in bucket idea sounds much better to me.


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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Posts
    638

    Default

    Wow, lots of good ideas here! We have a dressage court with the pylons that Poltroon suggested, but some of the horses will step over the rails at that height if the riders point them at it or don't steer. Two of them (we think they're related) do it gleefully while snickering under their breath. The rest of the arena fence is about 30", and no one has managed to convince one of the horses to exit over the fence, and even (accidentally) loose horses respect the barrier at that height, so we feel pretty comfortable with that. We're using this area to contain the super-beginner riders, so poles on the ground and things like that are not going to be quite enough.
    The pinless cups and posts in cement buckets are good ideas that I'm going to look into.
    Thanks for the replies so far, your answers are really helping me work through my options!
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  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2001
    Location
    Nashville, TN USA
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    I am a safety freak and have been for 20+ yrs. FREAK.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nashfad View Post
    I am a safety freak and have been for 20+ yrs. FREAK.

    Me too. Nothing wrong with that.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2009
    Posts
    772

    Default

    I recently set up a beginner program. They can't steer, so some things that would work if you were just training are not appropriate for this use. I would NOT use step in posts. If a kid fell on them they could be impaled. I considered using electric tape, but rejected it because I was concerned about it getting hung up on a stirrup and being trailed around as a spook hazard. I also think that my insurance company would reject that idea. If you are teaching beginners, insurance companies have lists of requirements. If you have an accident and there is a claim...you need to not be found negligent. My company specified that there be no wire perimeter around riding school rings, for instance.

    One of my rings is bordered by no climb, so that's not helpful for you, but the other is bordered by vinyl.

    You could buy single long white vinyl rails, as used for fencing. They need support every 10" or they sag. I think you could get creative for the supports, and either cut slots in the tp of tall white buckets filled with sand, or buy plastic bathroom trash bins and do the same thing. The vinyl isn't cheap, but it will look a lot better than saggy tape, and will be safer. If some one wobbles into it, it will just fall over.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2012
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Make a PVC post & rail fence:
    - Secure a 3" diameter PVC upright in a bucket with a little cement (not too heavy)
    - Drill 2" diameter holes - both sides - in top of 3" PVC prior to setting in bucket
    - Get several 10 foot long (or whatever length you want) 1 1/2" diameter PVC pieces. Stick them into the drilled holes of the 3" pipe.

    You'll end up with something like this (with just a single top rail) and portable PVC!

    Or if height weren't as much or an issue, turn buckets upside down and drill holes into them. Insert your length poles in bucket holes. But those would wind up being too low for your needs I'm thinking.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,368

    Default

    Orange traffic cones come as tall as 36". You could use them for the uprights to support tape or rope. They would be safer to fall on than step-in posts.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



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