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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
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    Colorado- Yee Haw!
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    2,755

    Default Part time professional jobs- do they exist? Any stories of going PT after FT?

    Not in the super near future, but in my longer plan I would like to cut back from my full time job and spend more time as a mom (meet the school bus etc.) That said- I really like my job and would love to find a challenging job that I can do 20 hours a week rather than 50. (I do project management and business case analysis.) Are there part time options for this type of job? I just don't see any out there and my company is a full time+ situation where very very few people work part time and not in the role I do.

    Has anyone done this? Where do you find this type of job? How did the transition work for you?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Contract work?

    I've picked up a little that way since quitting my FT job. But not much. I haven't tried very hard though, just stuff for old contacts.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
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    3,477

    Default

    I do similar work (business systems analyst with a bit of program management thrown in). Years ago, at a different job, I was able to negotiate down to 30 hours a week, with 8 of them worked at home, so I was able to go into work only three days a week.

    Current job wasn't interested in part time, but I was able to negotiate an off schedule 7:00am - 3:00pm M-Thurs and Fridays worked at home. I do some work at odd hours, as well, early evening, sometimes on the weekend, etc...all from home. It's full-time, but it does enable me to get DS10 right after school, volunteer for some school activities (especially on Fridays) and be around more than I'd otherwise be able to.

    I've found this to be a pretty good compromise between full-time work and meeting family needs.

    I have never been able to find a job like this where I could have part-time or flexible hours right off the bat, it's much easier to negotiate from a regular full-time position where they know you and value your work. If your current job absolutely will NOT negotiate flexibility, I'd look for another full-time job at a company with a reputation for flexibility and then negotiate a better schedule once you've established yourself. That's how I did it...I started this job with standard full-time, on site, hours and then negotiated something different after I'd been here about a year and a half.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2002
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    2,221

    Default

    I've managed to have this kind of situation, but only after putting in my dues as a full time employee for a company - that company was willing to negotiated less hours with me after I'd been with them 10 years.

    Later I did some 1099 work for various related companies.

    Now I'm a full time Controller again, but this company does have some highly paid part time professional Tech Writers, EOD Technicians & Software training Engineers. All people they knew for a long time though, I don't believe any were hired as Part time pros who had not already been with the company full time for awhile.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5

    Default

    Contract work would probably be your best bet. I currently do contract consulting work which offers me almost complete flexibility in when (and where) I work, as long as I meet the deadline.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,122

    Default

    as a side line job I review technical manuals for a specific industry to correct errors and add clarifications in application of the products.

    Most installation manuals are written by engineers in a sterile environment not taking into account the inconsistencies of the field or the inabilities of the average installer to understand what was written


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2011
    Posts
    842

    Default

    If you have a masters degree, you should be able to teach for your local colleges -- most colleges are offering online courses now and need solid instructors. The number of courses you can get per semester varies from college to college; some people are happy with 1 or 2, and others teach 10+. Just depends on the need.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Posts
    1,119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex and Bodie's Mom View Post
    If you have a masters degree, you should be able to teach for your local colleges -- most colleges are offering online courses now and need solid instructors. The number of courses you can get per semester varies from college to college; some people are happy with 1 or 2, and others teach 10+. Just depends on the need.
    really? I have a masters in biology with 10 yrs experience... would this count? Wouldn't this take a lot of hours to prepare lectures/grade, etc? Thanks



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
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    6,867

    Default

    Yes, Senden. You could be an adjunct professor teaching Biology 101 If you happen to be in western WA, the community college I work at is currently looking for a Biology teacher for the military sites. One is grounded (in the classroom) and a few are online.

    The community colleges are easier to get a foot in the door, call up HR or approach the Dean of Sciences (or similar) for info.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    6,867

    Default

    I also need to add this, I am currently an online student. My college is Liberty University and it is one of the top 3 online accounting programs. I really, really have enjoyed having instructors who have "real world" experience. My first Accounting instructor is a CFO full time and also holds a CFE certification. She teaches part time, and I was so impressed with her knowledge and the way she portrayed her profession I became an Accounting major! That real world experience is wonderful for students to hear about.


    When we have staff and faculty meetings at work I have to honestly say I have no idea what LalaLand some of the professors live in LOL!!! They have never done anything except teach.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
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    Default

    I'm not sure that PT college teaching would pay anywhere near what OP is likely getting now for what she currently does, at least based on the market here in the Boston area.

    OP, would you be willing to forgo the project/program management piece and just do the analysis? I've found the project management is almost always a full-time job, mostly on-site. Business analysis, however, can easily be part time...and, often remotely, from home with trips into the office for meetings. I have no idea what the job market is like in CO, but good analysts are constantly in demand around here. That said, I've never seen PT analyst job posted. It's really a matter of getting in the door somewhere with a flexible attitude and then negotiating for PT after you've proven yourself.

    Have you ever approached your current employer about PT, flexible schedule or telecommuting? At a previous job of mine, I asked after my youngest was born. I was Program Manager at the time, having been promoted there from business analyst a couple of years before. The told me they could not accomodate a PT Program Manager, but if I wanted to switch back to analysis, sure, I could work PT. I did, I didn't even have to take a pay cut (other than the proration for fewer hours worked). It worked out well.


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
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    Colorado- Yee Haw!
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    Default

    Thanks! I actually did switch jobs when I had my daughter from a 60+ hour a week job to my current job which is much closer to 40 hours a week. I have talked to my employer about part time options, but it is never the right time or the right role. I have not pushed it yet as I'm not quite ready to make the move and I don't want to been seen as the un-dedicated one for now. I've been with the company over 8 years and think I'm pretty well viewed- I only talked to one other manager when I was looking for an option to my previous job and he pretty quickly found me a place. (My previous job was a 24 hour on call if something came up type job that while I loved the job and the challenge just did not work for my new lifestyle as a mom. I actually miss the excitement of managing really big projects and being at the forefront of major technology development.) I also telecommute 1 day a week now- when things are not really busy, or there's a new hire etc. It allows me to cycle the laundry through between calls- which is a huge help.

    I do have a graduate degree and have teaching experience from being a TA in grad school. So, I have considered the community college route. I just enjoy what I do and would rather keep my foot in it. I keep thinking that with over a decade of experience in my field and bringing results that I have a lot of value to add even if I don't want to work full time. It seems like a big shame there are not more options out there. I have a number of really talented friends that either resent working full time or have quit to be SAHMs when a lot of us would love to be able to work school hours. With the economy so tenuous though I like the risk mitigation of both my husband and I working for now.

    I was just curious if I was missing out on opportunities or if others struggled with the same thing.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2011
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    1,668

    Default

    4Martini, just wait until next year, after Obamacare kicks in. You will see A LOT of part time positions. Those part time positions will replace what was typically a full time job.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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