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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2003
    Location
    Newtown, CT, USA
    Posts
    136

    Default Blanketing for a horse with Azoturia

    My 11 yr old Morgan mare tied up almost 2 years ago in the winter. We worked her back slowly and she has done well, no more episodes since then. She is on pasture board and always has been, I don't blanket her often at all, only if it is FREEZING and wet or stormy (I'm in VA, but used to live in CT and barely blanketed there either). The Vet recommended that I blanket her when it is cold and wet to limit the chance of her tying up from shivering. I asked them again when they came out for spring shots to see if I should continue this from now on - they said yes. Has anyone had experience with a horse that has tied up? What kind of blanketing do you do? She seems comfortable even when it is chilly and windy and she has a run-in in her paddock.
    If it was your horse, would you blanket if its windy too? I don't want to over blanket because she isnt used to it, and I also worry about flattening her coat....
    I appreciate all suggestions Thanks!
    \"A horse gallops with his lungs, perseveres with his heart and wins with his character\"



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,958

    Default

    Maybe post this on Horse Care?
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver, Equine Insurance Specialist



  3. #3

    Default

    I think the point is to keep her from clenching her muscles to stay warm or stressing out. I wouldn't worry about flattening her hair either, it'll fluff right back up when you take it off again.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2000
    Location
    Where am I and what am I doing in this handbasket?
    Posts
    23,441

    Default

    azoturia - that term is a blast from the past!

    Was it a one time thing or did she behave like an EPSM horse? I would just treat her like normal if it was the former and adjust diet accordingly if it was the latter.

    As for blanketing, if she isn't clipped, you will probably only be doing her a favor by blanketing her when it is windy and/or wet (rain wet, not snow wet, unless it is that really heavy, wet snow that soaks through everything) or if you see her shivering when it is not either of those things. I had an old pony who just got cold when she got old. Even without clipping AND living in the deep south, she still needed a blanket.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2003
    Location
    Newtown, CT, USA
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Thanks! Thats what i thought, just keep her comfy. It was only a one time thing and normally she wasn't blanketed even if it was wet and cold.
    \"A horse gallops with his lungs, perseveres with his heart and wins with his character\"



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 1999
    Location
    Middleburg VA and Southampton NY
    Posts
    6,130

    Default

    If your horse has done well without blankets, chances are it's because most horses actually do fine that way in all sorts of weather, as long as they are a healthy weight and have enough food available to stay that way.

    I have made it my business to stay informed about tying up, as I have one horse that has RER, and would tie up regularly if he wasn't managed appropriately. I have never read or heard anywhere that blanketing affects a horse's likelihood of tying up, and I don't think there is a basis for thinking so.

    Tying up symptoms instead result from over-exertion, especially when exercise has been irregular and a horse is unfit, or, from over-exertion of a fit horse who has had a break in activity. The metabolic mechanisms that cause a horse to tie up are at the cellular level and genetics determine whether these are 'caused' by RER, ESPM, or PSSM. All of these syndromes are addressed through exercise management and a nutritional plan that includes a high fat ration.

    When it's cold, my horse has worn blankets for extended periods, but he is seldom confined to a stall for long stretches, just overnight in bad weather or in for daytime hours during the summer because of heat.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2003
    Location
    Newtown, CT, USA
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Ok, thanks. I think I'm going to limit the blaneting, but only do it when the weather is cold and wet. The Vet said that she was worried that any shivering would over exert her muscles and make her more prone to tying up again.... I can see how this would be a concern, but because she isnt normally blanketed, I have never noticed her being cold.
    \"A horse gallops with his lungs, perseveres with his heart and wins with his character\"



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