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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    46

    Default An Odd Issue With Eq. Over Fences

    We started jumping my greenie over jumps that are about 2'-2'3" the other day, and in doing so, we discovered that he has a REALLY round jump over anything higher than 18". My issue is that I've only ever really jumped eq. horses with really smooth, flat jumps up until now, and so every time I go over a jump with him, my heels fly up, I duck way too much, slouch way too much, and come out of the saddle way to much. I still can't do anything past singles with him, so no grids, but any recommendations?

    I have tried shortening my stirrups, by the way, but my leg doesn't seem to be the issue as much as my upper body and seat.

    Thank you!

    EDIT: Ignore the title, something wierd happened when I was typing this, and I just thought that some words were deleted, but it turned out that it gave me a title that was meant for a post a while ago about a problem that I ended up fixing and not having to post about. I guess it kind of fits, though.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,523

    Default

    Is there a horse at your barn with a poppy jump you can learn on for a bit to get you more ready for your boy?
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2007
    Posts
    333

    Default Try "folding"

    Because you probably have a good quiet seat it can be easier,safer, and feel more connected to not worry so much about getting out of the saddle. Just fold up to stay out of the way. You still want to have the hip to heel line and stay with the vertical point of your horse, but this would enable you to work on steadying your leg to give you back your base of support. It won't take long once you're not worried about it. This is where a following hand will be very helpful, but it's ok to over release to keep from popping horsey in the mouth. Maybe greenie wants to go to the Olympics?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,438

    Default

    1. Grab some mane
    2. Make sure you are disciplined with your eyes - resolutely look up and ahead, not down.
    3. Grab some mane.
    4. Think, "open your shoulders" which will help you not collapse over the top of the jump, helping you stay over your hip and heel.
    5. Did I mention grabbing some mane?
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    8 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2001
    Posts
    4,693

    Default

    I had a round, "poppy", huge jumping, back cracking youngster. Got jumped seriously loose over every oxer. Grabbing mane and stuffing my heels down made me pinch with the knees and just popped me further out of the saddle.

    I learned to stay with him using a following hand/auto-release and thinking about keeping my knees just a touch open so I wasn't pinching. Staying soft in the hand and leg let my body angles appropriately close over the fence without an excess effort on my part.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2010
    Location
    Southern Maryland
    Posts
    111

    Default

    My current horse is a really nice hunter type but jumps much rounder than anything I've ridden before. It is a bit of an adjustment!

    I was taught to think of pushing my heals down and pushing my feet slightly forward on take off. Pushing the feet forward a bit seems to push my butt back and down and helps me fold more at the hip. Works for us!
    http://www.hunterjumperconnection.com/hjc-blog.html

    A blog featuring the musings of a semi-neurotic adult amateur rider on riding, training, showing, life.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    835

    Default

    I have a similiar issue, my 4 y/o mare has a pretty flat and easy form over 2'6 and under. Getting up to 2'9-3' at the end of a gym, produces a very round jump which pops me out of the saddle.
    And since I only jump her once a week over a series of maybe 6-10 jumps total and not all being that high, it is hard to practice so I have to make the best of my rides.

    Plus, I don't have the option of riding other round jumpers since they are not any at my barn.


    I focus on my heels and pretending that I have to DIG them into the ground like the Flintstones do as brakes for their cars lol. I also make sure that I am not leaning up my horses neck, I rather visualize staying back in the saddle and butt to cantle in my two point. Seems extreme but it helps me keep my core activated and keeps me in the centre of the saddle.

    I practice a two point doing that and warm up with some no stirrup excercises and the stand two beats trot, sit one, stand three, sit one, etc. This warms up my muscles and helps me keep my leg in the right position.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by airineek View Post
    My current horse is a really nice hunter type but jumps much rounder than anything I've ridden before. It is a bit of an adjustment!

    I was taught to think of pushing my heals down and pushing my feet slightly forward on take off. Pushing the feet forward a bit seems to push my butt back and down and helps me fold more at the hip. Works for us!
    didn't see this! Exactly THIS! Great minds I tell you...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2008
    Location
    at work and the barn...middle of nowhere PA
    Posts
    247

    Default

    Echo what others have said about grabbing mane and softening your joint. My guy did the "jump to the moon over anything questionable" thing for a while, and whenever we would head to a jump I thought he might power over, or pretty much any jump for that matter, I'd get into a galloping/2-point position, anchor my heels, and I just kept chanting to myself "are my joints working? Are my joints working?". And I'd grab mane like heck. It sounds kind of silly, but I used to have a stiff position, and sometimes I really have to remind myself to stay soft and let gravity do its job, bc the more I stiffened, the more I'd POP.


    Hallelujah he got over that stage.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2002
    Location
    Area VIII, Region 2, Zone 5.
    Posts
    6,593

    Default

    Instead of grabbing mane, strap a stirrup leather around the horse's neck and ride to the jumps with your hands holding the strap. You will learn to follow the horse's motion over the fence. Think about landing "heels first" and tighten your calf, not your knee, before you get to the fence, and keep it on. I remember realizing one day that I had gotten into the habit of taking my leg off as the horse started to jump, so I was gripping with my knees which made my leg slip back. Once I remembered to keep my calf tight and think about landing heels first, things fell back into place.
    Quote Originally Posted by Linny View Post
    Those martingales were so taut, you could play Ode to Joy on them with a comb



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2003
    Posts
    2,185

    Default

    You might also try shortening your stirrups a hole or three. My 4.5 year old is like an enormous bouncy ball and jumps me out of the tack on the regular unless I jack up my stirrups, get into my two-point, and let him jump up to me.

    My other horse (who has a very big but smooth jump), goes best if I sit like a German to the fences, and I didn't realize what a difference shortening my stirrups and getting up out of the saddle would make until my trainer had me do so with the baby.
    You can take a line and say it isn't straight- but that won't change its shape. Jets to Brazil



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2011
    Posts
    957

    Default

    Instead of thinking of jamming your heel down (and ending up with pinched knees or loose legs) think about tightening your calf around the horse. The old "squeeze the toothpaste out of their nose" move. I don't usually think about my heels over a fence since I know they are down when I approach the fence. Just keep your legs tight and don't let your crotch get over the pommel. Your heel should stay down.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2001
    Location
    The Great White North, where we get taxed out the wazoo
    Posts
    629

    Default

    Think "hold your shoulder"- my coach used to tell me to pose like I was going to be on the cover of Practical Horseman. I also use to think to push my hand forward, then push myself "UP" in the air.
    I'm sure as he gets comfortable with the job you will get comfortable with his jump.
    Lucky you to have such a problem.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by airineek View Post
    My current horse is a really nice hunter type but jumps much rounder than anything I've ridden before. It is a bit of an adjustment!

    I was taught to think of pushing my heals down and pushing my feet slightly forward on take off. Pushing the feet forward a bit seems to push my butt back and down and helps me fold more at the hip. Works for us!
    Great advice. Take heart that it will get easier to ride his jump.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2006
    Posts
    275

    Default

    [QUOTE=SillyHorse;6735137]Instead of grabbing mane, strap a stirrup leather around the horse's neck and ride to the jumps with your hands holding the strap. \QUOTE]

    THIS! Wouldn't jump a greenie without a neckstrap. William Fox Pitt rides all his horses in one, so that's good enough for me



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    433

    Default

    Squat a little on take-off and let the horse come thru you a bit.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2012
    Posts
    402

    Default

    I also recommend thinking of "wrapping" your leg around the horse. Helps me get the strong and long leg without pinching my knees.
    I like mares. They remind me of myself: stubborn know it alls who only acknowledge you if you have food.
    Hannah B. Nana: 50% horse, 50% hippo
    Fiona: can't decide between jumpers or napping



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,225

    Default

    Besides grabbing mane, try adding a bit of speed. Work on that canter instead of the old OMG a JUMP we all tend to do with an unpredictable or green horse.

    Add some speed to smooth the canter and KEEP it to, over, after and between. Pretty common to try to overmanage a Greenie to the base and have them poppping up to overjump out of nothing pace wise. Keep your leg on, be careful not to abandon him, think about continuing the canter, not the jump.

    He is Green, remember he is Green and it is going to take time for him. During that time you need to help by keeping canter momentum and letting him figure things out.

    Hesitate to recommend it not seeing where you and this horse are but...if he wants more height? Go to 2'6"ish and add an oxer in there. Have worked with many trainers who start Greenies and cannot think of any that worked below 2'6" once they had the canter established, very few trot jumps-and they all say too much too low and too many trot fences makes them sloppy and careless. Overmanaging the canter and trying to create distances makes for a backed off horse as well.

    Grab the mane, add leg, go and keep going. He'll tell you if he wants to be an Eq horse or a nice Hunter after he gets some miles.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 12, 2010
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Grab mane (or neckstrap) but think about pulling up on the mane a little bit while opening your chest up. Its tempting to grab mane and lean on the neck which can collapse your chest and make the whole thing even more jarring.

    Also, try starting with a series of canter rails where you eventually add a jump with a landing rail. You can let the exercise help him find a nice canter rhythm so you can focus on riding straight with a supportive leg. Make sure you keep your leg across the jump so he knows what you want on the other side. If you get to the jump and stop asking him to flow forward, you may get a round jump followed by a very hard landing!



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