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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
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    3,355

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    How about a chain/leather lead shank. Run the chain through the bit ring, one loop through the nose band, through the off side bit ring and back to the lead shank. Just put the leather shank in your hand along with the reins. It would be descrete, but effective to get his attention. Sounds like he has your number when out in public!!! Biothane reins would be more difficult to chew/ruin, but I think you need to address the behavior before it escalates.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    865

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    If possible you can take him to some local 4-H or open shows. Go and do a halter class or showmanship class. Let the judge know he's an ass and carry a dressage whip to pop him with when he bites or lunges. You may also be able to find a good trainer there who can take him in and have that CTJ type event at the local show if you aren't comfortable doing it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    2,416

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    Please check the rules for yourself and verify with the USEF, but I believe that you can jog with bridle on, reins resting on the neck, and a lead attached to the bit. I saw it done once with a bad actor, someone wanted to protest and the ruling came back that it was okay to jog that way. This was a few years ago and I was not directly involved, but was told of the outcome.
    www.midatlanticeq.com
    Mid-Atlantic Equitation Festival,Scholarships and College Fair
    November 14-16, 2014



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2012
    Location
    Phoenix/Charlotte
    Posts
    200

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    A bunch of people have addressed the behavior issue (which I agree with) but to directly answer your question, try these:

    http://www.victorycanter.com/product...5&cat=0&page=1

    I swear they're indestructible, and they look like leather. When I say indestructible I mean I have a pair that a crazed pack of Afghan hounds (aka our dogs) got ahold of for an hour or so out in the pasture and they didn't even leave a mark. Lesser reins would have been digested.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Posts
    1,761

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    First, I'd get beta reins. http://store.runningbear.com/catalog...at=31&scat=209 The beta brown color will be close enough to a leather look that no one should really notice.

    Second, I'd be having CTJ meetings until the biting stopped. I don't care who is watching or if I get disqualified. Biting and other dangerous behavior is NOT tolerated. I wouldn't just have the crop in his face, I'd be using it.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Location
    Southern Pines, N.C.
    Posts
    11,450

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    +First I would go to the warm up area of another ring at the show you are attending, and practice jogging. If it is not in you to have a CTJ session, get your trainer to do it. -- Speaking of which, what has your trainer recommended?

    If you do not want to have a training session in a warm up area with people in it, I would do it at the end of the day or beginning of the day. If you do not want to stay late or get up early, then get someone to do it for you.

    But you are the one who needs to work with him because the behavior happens with you. He may be good for someone else anbd then get away with things with you because he knows he can.

    You can also jog with your reins fed through the throat latch; I have seen that done and the horse has neve been knocked down for it. That will solve the problem of him chewing on your reins, but not of his "I can get away with whatever I want to" attitude.

    One last thought --- when he gets back to his stall after the jog, does he immediately pee? Horses can get snarky when they have to pee. And once the snarkyness started, it has escalated into a habit.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2001
    Location
    The Great White North, where we get taxed out the wazoo
    Posts
    638

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    As to the suggestion that a trainer or pro jog him/administer the CTJ moment: if this is an amateur division does the horse not have to be jogged by an amateur? In Canadian rules they would be.
    I agree with jogging with the reins on the neck and a chain shank as part of the program and rip him a new one if he tries to bite.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    14,952

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    Under USEF rules, anyone may jog a horse in the amateur division.

    The only restrictions on jogging are for divisions where the horse or pony must be shown by a junior. Then the entry must also be jogged by a junior, though it does not have to be the same junior who rode it.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2001
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,797

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    Been there with a bottle fed baby who did the conformation division. Jogged that sucker every chance I had, but in the show environment his nerves translated into biting. He had CTJ meetings with trainers much larger than me and those were in the ring during jogs and in the model portion of the classes, so it wasn't something we ignored. It was an ingrained behavior from his being bottle fed. When we started him in the junior divisions he had to be jogged by a junior so I had to come up with a solution.

    I continued to jog him daily during and after riding - I'd get off him and jog, then get back on and continue to ride. Repeat time after time. Honestly - made just a minor difference in the show environment. Finally found that me holding him outside the ring until the jog was called, meeting the junior rider at the in gate, stopping long enought to tranfer the reins and stuff something in his mouth, then her jogging him was the only way to get it done. Heaven forbid they had a re-jog. Things could get a bit dicey in those cases. She learned to just carry extra mints or whatever to stuff into his mouth if needed. Noseband as tight as we could get it as well.

    For everyone who will say this is a behavior that needs to be stopped - we tried. And I'm not saying we tried for a couple of shows and then gave up. I worked with this horse for 6 1/2 years. He was a lamb to work with other than this. Never put a foot wrong except when he got nervous. The CTJ meetings scared him and made him worse for a while until he finally just shut down if you tried to correct him. I finally had to work around it and found a solution. I still had to be very careful around him when he was nervous - it went straight to his mouth - but this was not something that was going to be beaten or trained out of him. In his case, nerves = grab onto something and hold it. Behavior learned as a bottle fed baby.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,659

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tackpud View Post
    Been there with a bottle fed baby who did the conformation division. Jogged that sucker every chance I had, but in the show environment his nerves translated into biting. He had CTJ meetings with trainers much larger than me and those were in the ring during jogs and in the model portion of the classes, so it wasn't something we ignored. It was an ingrained behavior from his being bottle fed. When we started him in the junior divisions he had to be jogged by a junior so I had to come up with a solution.

    I continued to jog him daily during and after riding - I'd get off him and jog, then get back on and continue to ride. Repeat time after time. Honestly - made just a minor difference in the show environment. Finally found that me holding him outside the ring until the jog was called, meeting the junior rider at the in gate, stopping long enought to tranfer the reins and stuff something in his mouth, then her jogging him was the only way to get it done. Heaven forbid they had a re-jog. Things could get a bit dicey in those cases. She learned to just carry extra mints or whatever to stuff into his mouth if needed. Noseband as tight as we could get it as well.

    For everyone who will say this is a behavior that needs to be stopped - we tried. And I'm not saying we tried for a couple of shows and then gave up. I worked with this horse for 6 1/2 years. He was a lamb to work with other than this. Never put a foot wrong except when he got nervous. The CTJ meetings scared him and made him worse for a while until he finally just shut down if you tried to correct him. I finally had to work around it and found a solution. I still had to be very careful around him when he was nervous - it went straight to his mouth - but this was not something that was going to be beaten or trained out of him. In his case, nerves = grab onto something and hold it. Behavior learned as a bottle fed baby.
    If the horse was that nervous and a wreck after 6.5 years, it appears it was the wrong career for him. I can't imagine forcing a horse that never acclimated after 6 years, if it was truly nerves.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2001
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,797

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    He wasn't a nervous wreck - he went around quietly and happily on a loose rein in the hunters without meds. He just got tense waiting at the ring right before the jog and it would come out in his mouth. He was completely happy in his job and won everywhere. There was no question that he enjoyed the shows - just not the jogs. Don't know why he didn't like the jog - don't know why that particular part of showing made him nervous - it just did. He won so we dealt with it the only way we could.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    970

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    If you need to train him at the show, do it in the schooling ring during a quiet time, or somewhere on the grounds. Your horse has no clue if he is being judged or not....he's doing it because he's learned this is a fun thing to do, because its boring to stand still in the ring patiently. Replicate the scenario as best you can, that's when you need to school him. When you're jogging, you should be next to his head and the reins should be in your hand below his mouth, not in front of it. If he tries to grab a rein you need to pop him quick with your stick, behind you (and if you're in front of him you won't be able to do this). If he tries to run you over, I'd stick a halter over the bridle and school him with a chain over the nose if you have to. If you have to drag him to get him to jog, he needs to learn to jog WITH you. You can do this with a lunge whip or long dressage whip. Don't look back at him and have someone behind you if its needed to get him moving.
    The last thing I'd do with a mouthy horse is bribe him with treats. This will only reinforce his oral fixation, and he'll always be looking for something - reins, treat, you, whatever. He needs to understand the ring is where he works, not plays. As soon as he tries to grab something, give him a hard whack - a reality check type of whack and get his attention. Lather, rinse, repeat - soon enough it will register that grabbing something means he's going to pay for it.



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