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  1. #21
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    Dec. 4, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Of all the aussies I've owned, I only had one who grew up in an apartment. in downtown St Louis. Well it was the top floor of a house which had been turned into apartments by its owner who had moved to one of the many cities surrounding St Louis.

    Coze ate a stuffed chair. She was not hyperactive (I've only had one hyperactive aussie over the decades.) She torn down clothes out of the closet. And dug into plant containers. If I hadn't had a siamese kitten as well, and my boyfriend's english cocker in there, I'm sure she would have done a lot more.

    And I had to walk Coze and the cocker and my kitten (who thought she was an aussie) since my boyfriend did not think animals needed all that walking. In St Louis. Back when we were mugged at 8am and noon. I never got mugged after I bought Coze. And we never got burglarized after we got the dogs. But midnight on the streets of downtown St Louis was spooky.

    Was it worth it? Oh yes. Aussies are the best dogs ever. I'd do it all again if I had to. However, I did learn from that experience that a yard, like the one where I grew up and we had dogs, including my first aussie Boo, was the way to go. So after I left St Louis, I made sure Coze and my other aussies all had a fenced yard to play in.

    Check out www.lasrocosa.com. All my aussies except Boo and Binkie have been las rocosa aussies. And buy the Hartnagle's books.
    I love Las Rocosa lines (I'm actually looking at a litter by a LR dog), but I would never suggest them for an apartment life. Very high drive dogs. I also wouldn't look at a mini.

    Talk to some breeders local to you. They might have a retired dog looking for a good home. Aussies can work in apartment living, but you need to get out with them. They still need activity, and they still need a job to do.
    Riding the winds of change

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  2. #22
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    Nov. 26, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    aussies are very "split" right now- the more laid back ones come from the conformation lines, and they tend to be large. Traditional working aussies are smaller and have less coat than the conformation lines, and require much more exercise/work than conformation lines; minis were developed from the smaller working aussies. If you want an "aussie lite" don't look to the minis, in other words- just because they are smaller doesn't mean they require less exercise or work. In fact, a large conformation line aussie is more likely to be an "aussie lite" laid back type dog than is a mini.
    I'd also suggest going to the rescues and look for an adult aussie that suits your particular lifestyle.
    Thanks for this. I've never been around mini aussies, only full size ones ( and just pet full size ones), and I'm totally unaware of this split between the sizes. I wasn't planning on getting a puppy. I have two dogs that I've seen on various rescue websites that look like what I want (obviously, I'm only getting one). The one rescue allows for an overnight or weekend visit so I could get a small feel for how it would work.

    The only reason I was thinking about a mini aussie in the first place is because so many apartment complexes and landlords show a preference to small dogs.



  3. #23
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    Nov. 2, 2006
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    Maine
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    I would say herding dog plus agility drive is not likely to make for a good apartment dog. I have corgis that work in agility and obedience. They are well behaved when travelling, good when I take them to work, but always thrilled to get home to our place. They get regular off leash walks on our farm which are mental release and physical release. I am pretty sure the littlest one would turn into a monster if I worked a 9 to 5 job and left her home in apartment. That said, her brother who tested out much more laid back, happily lives in Brooklyn with a young couple. I tend to think of Aussies as even more high energy than corgis.



  4. #24
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    Nov. 5, 2002
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    way out west
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    I have a nine month old standard Aussie puppy. She's full of energy, but definitely has an "off" button. Then again, she has a doggie door that gives her full run of our fenced yard, and there seems to be an endless supply of interesting things to chase out there, since she's always zipping around. Now that we have ten inches of snow on the ground, she's especially active.

    I can't imagine her in an apartment, to be honest. I'm hoping to be able to take her on trail rides with me in the summer, and she is my walking/jogging companion, too. I've only seen her really tired a couple of times in the six months I've had her...and that's despite my best efforts to tire her out. Turns out it takes play dates with my son's border collie to really give her a workout.



  5. #25
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Why an Aussie? Just curious if there could be another breed that would do well with apartment living.

    My old cocker would have been a great apartment dog. She loved to run, but would just hibernate when no one was home.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  6. #26
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    Apr. 3, 2006
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    Spooner, WI
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    All I know for sure, you'd have hell to pay if you kept my 5 month in an apartment with extended periods of staying alone. Oh my is she a handful. She get tons of exercise even without a walk, but if you miss 'the walk' due to time constraints or bad weather, look out... She is agility bred.



  7. #27
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    Oct. 25, 2006
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    Central Illinois
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    Let me say that we have a HUGE fenced in yard and a total of four dogs. I have two aussies. One is a mini/standard & the other is a mini. The bigger one wasnt too crazy. My mini, Echo, is VERY active. He has a huge drive.

    Echo never stops moving. In fact, how we got him, was some people knew we had our other Aussie. They had gotten Echo as a puppy. Did not have a yard, but had another dog. THAT dog was trying to kill Echo. Needless to say, they asked if we would take Echo, since it was not an ideal situation.

    Again, we have four dogs. One, is a 4 yr old lab that plays w/Echo non stop. I take Echo to the barn and take him on trail rides.

    He gets a LOT of exercise, but still, is rarely still. When the weather stops me from taking Echo on rides, I put him on our treadmill. He loves it. Jumps on, circles until it gets going, so there are ways to make it work.

    They are VERY smart, too smart. They will follow you around unlike most other dogs. It is the herding part of them. Some dogs will just lay and watch you move around the room, both my Aussies, need to actually follow me, even if I am just moving a few feet. They can be kinda intense, but they were designed to herd, so it does make sense for them to WATCH more than a normal dog. So, it would be your total shadow.

    I will always have an Aussie, but again, will always have a fenced yard and other dogs for them to play along side, so I will be able to direct their energy to good.

    JUST KNOW that an Aussie is high energy breed. Unless you are able to direct their energy to good, it is probably NOT the breed for you.

    Good luck!



  8. #28
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    Oct. 25, 2006
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    Central Illinois
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    aussies are very "split" right now- the more laid back ones come from the conformation lines, and they tend to be large. Traditional working aussies are smaller and have less coat than the conformation lines, and require much more exercise/work than conformation lines; minis were developed from the smaller working aussies. If you want an "aussie lite" don't look to the minis, in other words- just because they are smaller doesn't mean they require less exercise or work. In fact, a large conformation line aussie is more likely to be an "aussie lite" laid back type dog than is a mini.
    I'd also suggest going to the rescues and look for an adult aussie that suits your particular lifestyle.
    I second this. My mini/standard comes from Show lines. He has the nice fluffy coat. He had energy when he was young, but nothing super crazy.

    Echo comes from more working lines. His coat is thinner, more scuffy. It is great. When I give him a bath after a trail ride, he is dry in less than 30 mins. My other aussie would take a lot longer to dry.

    So, other than size, my aussies do look different which goes along w/their difference in energy too.



  9. #29
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    My aussie now would be fine in an apartment and always would have; she's a very quiet easy-going dog without a bit of work instinct to chase or herd a thing. Her mother was show/conformation/companionship lines...she's small, weighed about 35 lbs until she got older and pudgier at age 9.

    Her father was Hanging Tree lines. He chewed through a steel exterior door to get outside when he thought he was being left. He also chewed through sheetrock and insulation and was working on the exterior siding when we came home once b/c he got left behind when we went for hay (the trailer went-he always freaked if he didn't go with the trailer). He did have a job-we lived on a ranch and he was for working sheep and always had livestock, he was just extremely stubborn and driven and needed MORE. At age 6 he started chasing the horses hardcore, even when the we and the kids were RIDING the horses, and then he started chasing the cats with intent to kill-I found him another home.

    I see more laid back and apartment friendly aussies than not but you would have to be very very careful what you chose!



  10. #30
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    Jun. 23, 2003
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    South Carolina
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    I had a full size for awhile in an apartment... he was fine, but he was never the neurotic overly energized Aussie. Of course I also ended up with a corgi who is just as lazy and not neurotic lol. My friend is currently fostering a purebred mini who is a total couch potato! So they are out there.



  11. #31
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    Can you get a dog walker to walk your dog every day at lunchtime? Do you have time to spend with the dog before and after work every day? Some dogs do well in apartments, but most need a good support system to make sure they get enough exercise and attention.



  12. #32
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    Jun. 10, 2009
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    I have a mini Aussie (28lbs) who just turned a year and she's the most wonderful little dog. I got a mini because I'm in my last year of college and will probably be moving around a bit and many landlords have size restrictions. Outside- she is tearing over hill and dale, accompanying me on 5 mile trail rides and keeping up with a gallop. I trained her not to cross the street without permission so she happily goes on long walks off-leash, even if I ride my bike in the street she follows on the side walk. Inside-- she does literally almost nothing but sleep. I don't have to crate her when I leave the house, just provide toys and water. She thrives on learning and practicing tricks. She is spoiled with daily play dates and several visits to the dog park and barn per week.

    If you plan to actually get up and take the dog out for appropriate exercise and train it, I say go for it because Aussies are wonderful!

    Pictured with her best friend, a Jack Russel https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...12844146_n.jpg
    Mini on the left, full size on the right https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...77831560_n.jpg

    If you get a mini you definitely want to check the breeder (or particular dog if its a rescue) because there are minis and there are minis...I've seen some mini & toy Aussies that looked more pomeranian than anything else. Some avid full-size fans will assert that there's no such thing as a mini Aussie, and maybe it's not technically correct, but my mini behaves exactly like the fulls I've known and looks just like them.



  13. #33
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    Jan. 8, 2009
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    DC
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    Really just depends on how active you are. I had Aussies in my NYC apartment while working full time for years, and they moved down here w/ me to DC (where I admittedly have a yard). I was a jogger until I throttled my ankle a few years ago, and they did just fine. I would go for a run in the park most mornings and they seemed to keep eachother entertained during the day. I've had mostly working and performance bred dogs. Of the two conformation bred dogs I've had, one was stupid and mellow (by Aussie standards) and the other extremely smart by also very, very energetic.

    I also competed w/ and bred Aussies. Happy to talk about lines and what to look for in a responsible breeder.



  14. #34
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    If you're not willing to go take your dog running in the rain or cold or snow, AND get heavily involved in training for agility or obedience or other sports, you probably don't want to get an aussie regardless of where you live. They aren't a "low needs" dog, and like most herding dogs they aren't going to go off and entertain themselves in the backyard- they want YOU to come out and play and work with them.
    So you should ask yourself, instead of whether an aussie can be kept in an apartment, you should ask, am I sure I want an aussie? if you just want a pet that you can live with and then take to agility class once a week, well, no, you don't want an aussie. A wide assortment of other dogs would be far more suitable. People think that "doing agility" is a big time investment that will keep a dog busy and tired, but for most dogs it isn't- most people only practice once a week for an hour. That might be enough to satisfy a lower-energy dog like a lab or a greyhound, but not a herding dog. Herding dogs need work to do each and every day, plus of course lots of daily exercise.

    When you are selecting a breed, I think you should sit down and make up a "weekly schedule". Every hour of the day for a week, write down what you imagine your dog, in the real world, will be doing. For most people, this ends up with big "NOTHING" in most spaces in the schedule. Let's say you work full-time. So you imagine you'll get up, take the dog for a run before work, then work, then you'll walk and play with the dog for an hour when you get home. So a typical dedicated working-person will have at most 2 hours of "stuff" for the dog to do each and every day, plus perhaps one night of going to agility practice. The rest of the time the dog is expected to do nothing. Unfortunately, that kind of schedule isn't going to satisfy a high-energy high-drive working dog. If you're a normal working person, when you look at breeds, check the "exercise/energy" levels first- most breed raters split breeds into low/moderate/high exercise needs. If you're a normal person willing to put in 2 hours a day, you want a "moderate" exercise needs dog, not a "high" exercise needs dog. If you can't put in those 2 daily hours, you want a "low" exercise needs dog. Very few people can handle the needs of a "high" exercise needs dog, best to avoid them. You and your dog will be much happier. Most people will be far happier if they stick with "low" exercise needs dogs- even "moderate" exercise needs dogs are too much work for a typical working person.



  15. #35
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Here are some things to consider with regards to apartment living and any dog.

    1) It can be difficult to find apartments/rental homes that allow dogs. Even if your current one does, you may find yourself needing to move elsewhere. So I think you're wise on choosing a smaller dog.

    2) Barking is a real problem to consider when you're sharing walls with someone else.

    3) I cannot emphasize enough that exercise is a HUGE thing. Even if you're blessed with a couch potato, you have to go out on leash a couple of times per day, and with an older dog (geriatric older) possibly more no matter the weather.

    I have two big dogs. Had them when we had a house, a few acres, etc. We did not have any idea we'd ever be moving into town, into a rental, into a place with no yard.

    My 9 1/2 YO lab and 2 1/2 YO Standard Poodle aren't particularly high energy. But they do need walks. And not just out to potty and back in. Long walks. It is time consuming.

    When my lab was younger and I was in a condo, that meant that I had to get up early, walk. Hire a dog walker for mid afternoon, then walk again at night. A tired dog is a good dog. And boy, if I missed a walk, SOMETHING was going to be destroyed. He was 2 at that time.

    Anyway, if you work long-ish hours or have a long commute, I'd factor in getting a dog walker.

    Also consider that with a dog with that kind of coat, you need to stay on top of it and in a carpeted apt, it can be a PITA.

    I am totally a dog person, love dogs. Can't imagine NOT having one. Had to wait a long time to get one due to living arrangements. So I understand your excitement. But like Wendy said, really look hard at the time you've got available to exercise. With a breed like an Aussie, they need the mental and physical exercise to be happy. (well, any that I have met do)
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  16. #36
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    Dec. 3, 2002
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    peterborough,ontario,canada
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    just don't get a yippy dog in an apartment setting. Wanted to shoot the owners of one that lives next door the the people i over night nannied their baby.



  17. #37
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Sorry I did not read anything except the OP. I've 'owned' aussies for decades.

    Some would definitely go insane and also drive person insane if had to live in an apartment with limited exercise.Some would not.

    Be careful . I have one now that is the most high energy dog I've ever known. She is also very sweet and funny BUT has to run and play several hours every day or it's not a good thing..



  18. #38
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    Dec. 31, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiningwizard255 View Post
    If you are just looking for a great apartment dog, greyhounds are awesome. With the right one you could do agility. Nice dogs!!
    Ditto this!



  19. #39
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    May. 6, 2007
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    Napanee ON
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    I had a mini who did great in an apartment (she was 2 when I got her from teh Humane Society). However, I have 2 other Aussies that I recused because they came from apartment life and it was just not enough mentally for them.

    I can understand your wanting for an Aussi, I have 2 now and an Aussi Cattle dog but we live on a farm with a fenced yard. Our 3 year old is pretty quiet now. I would suggest a mature Aussi for your apartment, and you can ask the breeder/rescue to find you one who has a quieter personality. They do exist.



  20. #40
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    actually greyhounds make lousy apartment dogs- they are, however, ideally suited for the lazy kind of person who mistakenly thinks that sticking a dog out in a yard is "exercise". The kind of exercise that greyhounds prefer- taking a full-on sprint a couple of times a day- isn't possible for an apartment-dweller to provide; however, someone with a fenced yard can provide this kind of exercise without having to do anything. Greyhounds do far better with free- sprinting time than with regular walking.

    This entire thread just reveals how persistent the idea is that sticking a dog outside in a yard is what the dog wants and needs. Most dogs I know who are owned by apartment-dwellers actually get far more exercise than dogs owned by people with houses and yards. Why? because people who live in apartments actually actively exercise the dog- they take it for walks and runs, and play with it. Many people who have houses and yards just stick the dog outside and that's it. And dogs sitting in yards really tend not to do much. They certainly don't get much exercise- if you were to actively walk your dog, the way you're supposed to, you'd get the dog moving continuously for 45 to 60 minutes, at least twice a day. Most dogs stuck out in yards don't move around much at all- they certainly don't trot or run for 45 minutes straight, and if they did, you'd probably think the dog had gone crazy- he'd be running endless number of laps around a small yard.
    We actually put some joggers' GPS units on dogs stuck out in fairly large yards, and found these dogs very rarely even managed to move over a single mile on an average day- versus the average apartment dweller's dog, who was walked vigorously for many miles a day.
    It doesn't matter where you live- if you get an active dog like an aussie, even if you have a yard, or even if you don't have a yard, you have to actively exercise the dog for hours a day. House or apartment, doesn't matter.



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